2 weeks ago

OxygenOS 2.1.2 with camera improvements and more now rolling out for the OnePlus 2


If you are sporting a OnePlus 2, you'll want to be on the lookout for an OxygenOS update to hit your phone with improvements for the camera and more. The update, which is rolling out in increments, bumps the software version to OxygenOS 2.1.2, and brings a number of changes to the phone.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Sprint now pushing Android 5.1 update to Moto X 2013


Sprint is now pushing the Android 5.1 update out for the Moto X 2013. The update, which carries the software version LPA23.12-39.10, began pushing a few days ago, with more users now seeing the notification for it.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

These are the top Huawei phones you need to know


The smartphone space is an increasingly populated – read, crowded – place to be. And it's getting more so as manufacturers such as Huawei start to pump out more, and better, phones, and push to expand its availability into more western markets. The past year was a pretty good one for Huawei with some excellent devices launched, and more sure to be on the way.

As new phones come and go, though, it's tough to keep up with things. So we're breaking it down into a continuously updated list to highlight the best devices that Huawei has to offer. These are the one's we'll be writing about and they'll also be the ones you'll likely want to consider.

Article updated November 2015.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Sony Xperia Z5 Premium is now available in the UK


The Xperia Z5 Premium is now available for purchase in the UK. Retailers including Clove, Carphone Warehouse and Unlocked-Mobiles have commenced sales of the 4K display-toting handset.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Xiaomi Redmi Note 2 Pro spotted at TENAA with metal body, fingerprint scanner


After launching the Redmi Note 2 earlier this year, it looks like Xiaomi is set to unveil a "Pro" variant of the handset with an all-metal chassis and a fingerprint scanner at the back.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Now that you have new phone choices, is Project Fi worth considering?

Project Fi

The reasons to not try Project Fi are diminished or gone completely, but there are still a few big restrictions.

When Project Fi first launched, invites were hard to come by and it was restricted to just the original Nexus 6 — both things that made it tough to consider for many people. Now that Google is rolling out invites at a faster clip (even recently opening the service to everyone for one day), and you have the choice of a new Nexus 6P and Nexus 5X, it may be worth reevaluating if its a good choice for you.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

BlackBerry Priv pre-order shipments experiencing delays due to high demand


Customers who pre-ordered the BlackBerry Priv may need to wait a bit longer before they receive their orders. BlackBerry is informing customers that due to high demand for the Priv, there have been shipping delays for some pre-orders. However, the company hopes to have all remaining pre-orders shipped by November 24.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Motorola begins Marshmallow rollout for Moto X Style and 2014 Moto X in select markets


Motorola's David Schuster took to Google+ today to announce that the company is set to start the initial deployment for Android 6.0 Marshmallow to the Moto X Style in Brazil and India and the Moto X (2014) in Brazil, while the updated is expected to start rolling out for the 2015 Moto X Pure Edition in the "next few weeks."

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Nexus 6P versus the Nexus 6


Nexus vs Nexus battle royale.

The new Nexus 6P is one of the best Android phones you can buy today. Premium to the nth degree, and hundreds of dollars less than comparable phones you'll find on the shelves or online stores. It's the first Nexus phone that comes without a bunch of compromises. I love mine.

But there's another high-end Nexus phone that's been around for a while, and people who have one still love it. That would be the original Nexus 6 from 2014. Bigger, better built, and running the same exact software as well (or better in some cases) as the latest from Google.

One of the most popular questions I get from people who know I'm a fan of the Nexus program is about which big Nexus is better — the Nexus 6 or the Nexus 6P. That's not an easy one to answer, so we had to take a good long look at both to help everyone decide.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

These are the top Sony Xperia phones you need to know


Whatever other difficulties the Japanese electronics giant has faced in recent years, you can't fault the overall quality of Sony's high-end Xperia smartphones. The schedule at which it refreshes its phones hasn't altered much in the same time frame and as we approach the end of 2015 we've recently had some new additions which continue what we love most about Sony.

But, Sony's still a bit of an outlier in the U.S. smartphone market, but high-end Xperias have enjoyed greater success in Europe, where they're widely available across many carriers. So without further ado, let's take a look at the ones you should be paying attention to.

Article updated November 2015.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Telefonica teams up with BQ to bring the Cyanogen OS-powered Aquaris X5 to Europe


Telefonica has teamed up with BQ to be the first mobile operator in Europe to launch a Cyanogen OS-powered smartphone. The first smartphone from the duo is the Aquarius X5, which features a 5-inch display with Cyanogen OS 12.1 pre-loaded on it.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

BlackBerry Vienna — the second Android BB — is a candybar with more physical buttons?


You didn't think BlackBerry wasn't working on something old-school, did you? The Priv is all the rage among those who live and die smartphones for a living (though whether anyone's actually buying it remains to be seen, especially since BlackBerry is taking its sweet time shipping it) — and so it makes perfect sense that we'd start seeing an old-school candybar-style phone making the rounds at some point.

Enter the BlackBerry Vienna. That's likely a code name, and what you see here might well not be finished product. (We're hearing that a more squarish display might be in the cards, and we can't caution BlackBerry enough against physical buttons.) But these renders — which take us all the way back to the days of the Motorola Charm (yikes) — do show one interesting feature: Several textures.

Plus, ya know, that keyboard.

So it's early days yet. Maybe this'll be a thing, and maybe it won't. But for sure it'll get those excited to see BlackBerry back in the game talking again. The question may be whether a return to the form factor that pretty much everyone left behind years ago can make a resurgence.

Source: Crackberry

For more, hit up our BlackBerry Vienna forum!

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Quick comparison: BlackBerry Priv versus Galaxy Note 5


There are several fantastic Android phones available this year, and choosing between them is all about your personal needs.

While there's a large group of Android users in full support of price being the biggest factor in what phone you get, there are some high-end phones absolutely worth considering. Samsung's phones this year are unparalleled in display quality and offer a quality experience with features no one else is offering right now, and the popularity of the new Note 5 reflects a desire to enjoy that experience. BlackBerry is another manufacturer to offer a quality high-end experience with unique features, not the least of which is a physical keyboard on a vertical slider with their new Priv.

If you sit these two experiences side-by-side, you'll see there's no shortage of differences between Samsung and BlackBerry's approach to building a high-end phone. We know, because we did, and now you can see just how different they are.

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Nexus 5X versus the original Nexus 5


With two years separating these LG-built Nexuses, does the new one match the legendary original?

At the time of its launch back at the end of 2013, the first Nexus 5 was a bit of a revelation. Following up on the inexpensive wonderment of the Nexus 4, LG cranked out another budget-friendly phone in partnership with Google that ended up being quite a hit with both average consumers and hardcore Android enthusiasts alike.

Two years later, we have the Nexus 5X, once again coming from a partnership of LG and Google, with naming and design clearly harkening back to the somewhat-inexplicable nostalgia toward the original Nexus 5. Understated design, simple materials and a "value greater than the sum of its parts" mindset have all carried over to this phone from its predecessor.

Have these two companies paired up to make a worthy successor to arguably the best-received Nexus of all time? We're going to explore just that.

Nostalgic hardware

"LG's second Ne​xus is the best phone you can buy for $350," said our review of the Nexus 5 back in 2013, and those are some big shoes to fill. Of course anyone who owned or used a Nexus 5 will know that that value didn't come from its outstanding hardware chops — far from it, as the Nexus 5 was squarely in the "passable" arena of external build quality. And really, it's the same story all over again on the Nexus 5X.

The hardware can be described as nostalgic ... or just dated.

The phones are nearly identical in materials and build, with soft touch coatings layered on completely plastic exteriors, dotted with buttons and ports where necessary. The only real identifiable differences are the symmetrical speaker grilles on the front, and change in camera design on the back, of the Nexus 5X. To be fair to the newer model the Nexus 5X does seem to exhibit a bit better fit-and-finish, though the improvement isn't dramatic — it's still just serviceable hardware, and it's expected to simply fade away and let you experience the software.

Perhaps one of the reasons we were all so willing to put up with the less-than-stellar build on the Nexus 5 was its size — even in 2013 and '14 a 5-inch display felt compact compared to the growing average screen size, and the Nexus 5 was very small even for its screen size. The Nexus 5X is compact for its day as well at 5.2-inches, though symmetrical bezels on the top and bottom have boosted its overall footprint a bit. It's still super easy to slip into a pants pocket or grasp in one hand, and that's important to a lot of people still.

Simply adding a little bit of physical size to the screen isn't the only thing that's changed here, though. Display technology has advanced notably in the past two years, and the LCD panel in place on the Nexus 5X is considerably nicer than the Nexus 5. Though both phones are the same 1920x1080 resolution the Nexus 5X is brighter and has more accurate colors, and doesn't exhibit the light bleeding from the edges of the screen often found on the Nexus 5.

Additions like the fingerprint sensor, USB-C and an improved display shouldn't be overlooked.

Internally, things have made a pretty predictable progression. The Nexus 5X has a Snapdragon 808 hexa-core processor, a step above the Snapdragon 800 quad-core in the 5, along with the expected bumps in things like radios and sensors. The questionable choices? RAM and base storage, which stick at 2GB and 16GB, respectively, two years later. We've also lost Qi wireless charging, which is a hard-to-explain loss. (If we had to guess, we'd blame thinness.)

The Nexus 5X has also taken a few more steps forward in the hardware department, namely with its absolutely wonderful fingerprint sensor, an improved speaker and jump to a USB-C port. Each add something extra to the hardware experience, and remind you that this is a modern phone when you set it alongside the Nexus 5.

Software and performance

When you set the two phones next to each other, both running Marshmallow of course, you actually can't immediately find a speed increase on the Nexus 5X over the Nexus 5 when just launching and thumbing through various apps. That's really a credit to the Nexus 5, which runs Android 6.0 at quite an amazing pace. Sure apps launch just a hair faster on the 5X, but it isn't something that'd be noticeable if you weren't running a side-by-side comparison.

Performance has only slightly improved, but battery life took a solid jump.

The Nexus 5X starts to pull away when it comes to multi-core performance, such as gaming or scrolling and interacting with heavy web pages and apps with lots of content. That's really what the newer generation of processor is going to give you by default, and in typical Nexus fashion we'd expect the Nexus 5X to only get faster in subsequent updates.

Where the differences really come out is in battery life. The Nexus 5X's 2700 mAh battery is over 15 percent larger than the Nexus 5's, but you're getting far more than that amount of longevity. Even a brand new Nexus 5 (i.e. one not run into the ground over two years) doesn't stand up to the full-day battery life available on the Nexus 5X, and if you've ever owned a Nexus 5 you know this is one of that phone's critical issues.

Now one of the main reasons why you may have had a Nexus 5 in the first place is software updates. Google (generally) does a pretty great job keeping its Nexus phones up to date for years after their release, but that well has to run dry at some point. We venture to guess the Nexus 5 is in for one more major release of Android — that'd be the N release, presumably — before being cut off, as we've just seen with the Nexus 4 only making it to Lollipop. Of course the Nexus 5X is two years further down the road and slated for multiple big Android releases in the future.

Camera prowess

For all of the similarities you can draw between the Nexus 5X and 5, the camera has taken a large jump in quality. Despite losing OIS (Optical Image Stabilization) on the Nexus 5X, we've gained resolution — 12.3MP up from 8MP — along with larger individual pixels and improved image processing. The end result is and important jump in camera quality, with the Nexus 5X being able to take better photos in a variety of situations.

You can't deny the solid improvement in camera quality, even though it's still a tad slow.

While the Nexus 5 pretty much required the use of HDR+ processing to get a good shot — and in the end could definitely take some great ones — that's no longer the case on the 5X, and your average non-HDR+ snapshot is pretty solid as well.

Much like the rest of the software experience the Nexus 5X hasn't dramatically improved the speed at which it captures photos, with HDR+ images still taking a while to process and general camera performance being simply good and not exceptional. But the bump in image quality can't be understated here, and while we wish OIS was still incorporated like on the Nexus 5 there can't be many complaints here — it's clear that Google has finally taken cameras seriously with the Nexus 5X (and Nexus 6P).

A steady (albeit unspectacular) progression

With two years separating the release of these phones, it's somewhat tough to evaluate how well they stack up against one another. The Nexus 5 was a standout offering for the end of 2013 (and through 2014 as well), and anyone who owned one is likely to agree. The Nexus 5X has improved solidly over its predecessor with a better screen, longer battery life, new hardware features and a markedly better camera, though we wouldn't blame you for expecting a larger progression in terms of build quality and overall performance.

And in the end, it's worth noting that the Nexus 5X retails for only $379 unlocked, just $30 more than the Nexus 5 debuted at when it was released. Keeping that it mind the rate of improvement seems understandable, though the Nexus 5X is at a bit of a disadvantage here as it has stiff competition of great inexpensive unlocked phones that the Nexus 5 never had to face. The 5X is also being pitted against another Nexus, the 6P, launched at the exact same time starting at just $120 more, which also raises our expectations for what it should be.

It's true, the Nexus 5X may not be the low-cost wonder that's a dead easy buying decision like the Nexus 5 was. But in attempting to fill the undeniably-large shoes of its predecessor, the 5X has done a pretty good job overall. This is a solid second take on a great original device, even if it falls short of being spectacular in itself.

Nexus 5X

Google B&H Photo Amazon

img { width: 100%; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } /* PORTRAIT */ div *:not(:last-of-type):not(div) + .devicebox, div .netshelter-ad + .devicebox:not(:nth-last-of-type(3)) { float: right; margin: 0 0 20px 20px; max-width: 350px; width: 50%; } div *:not(:last-of-type):not(div) + .devicebox h3, div .netshelter-ad + .devicebox:not(:nth-last-of-type(3)) h3 { text-align: center; } div *:not(:last-of-type):not(div) + .devicebox a.buy-link, div .netshelter-ad + .devicebox:not(:nth-last-of-type(3)) a.buy-link { margin: 0 5px 8px 0; width: calc(50% - 5px); } div *:not(:last-of-type):not(div) + .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-child(even), div .netshelter-ad + .devicebox:not(:nth-last-of-type(3)) .devicebox a.buy-link:last-child, div *:not(:last-of-type):not(div) + .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-child(even), div .netshelter-ad + .devicebox:not(:nth-last-of-type(3)) .devicebox a.buy-link:last-child { margin-right: 0; } div *:not(:last-of-type):not(div) + .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-child(odd):last-child, div .netshelter-ad + .devicebox:not(:nth-last-of-type(3)) a.buy-link:nth-child(odd):last-child { display: block; margin-right: 0; width: auto; } /* LANDSCAPE */ @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox .video, div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox h3 + p { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } div :last-of-type ~ .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 20px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 59px; } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox p img, div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox p, div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px), all and (max-width: 500px) { div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link { margin: 0 5px 8px 0; width: calc(50% - 5px); } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-child(even), div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:last-child { margin-right: 0; } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-child(odd):last-child { display: block; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) and (min-width: 501px) { div *:not(:last-of-type):not(div) + .devicebox a.buy-link:before, div .netshelter-ad + .devicebox:not(:nth-last-of-type(3)) a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } @media all and (max-width: 660px), all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px) { div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } div :last-of-type ~ .devicebox ul, div :last-of-type ~ .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 660px) and (min-width: 501px), all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px) { div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link { margin: 0 5px 8px 0; width: calc((100% / 3) - 7px); } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):nth-last-child(odd), div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):nth-last-child(n+3) { margin-right: 0; } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n+1):nth-last-of-type(2), div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n+1):nth-last-of-type(2) ~ a, div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n+1):nth-last-of-type(4), div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n+1):nth-last-of-type(4) ~ a { width: calc(50% - 5px); } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n+1):nth-last-of-type(2) ~ a:nth-last-of-type(odd), div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n+1):nth-last-of-type(4) ~ a:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin-right: 0; } div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-child(odd):last-child { display: inline-block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { div *:last-of-type ~ .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox, div *:not(:last-of-type):not(div) + .devicebox, div .netshelter-ad + .devicebox:not(:nth-last-of-type(3)) { float: none; margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

2 weeks ago

Gold Platinum Galaxy Note 5 now available from T-Mobile


T-Mobile is now offering those interested in the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 another color option for the smartphone. In addition to the black sapphire and white pearl, T-Mobile will be offering a gold platinum version.

Read more and comment

Show More Headlines