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2 years ago

Late-night poll: Do you use a security application?

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You might have noticed that we're going to talk a little extra about security and privacy this week here at Android Central. It's a discussion worth having. We've asked a few security and/or privacy related questions in polls past, things like lockscreen security (use it), app permissions, and Google's privacy policy, but we haven't hit this basic one just yet. Tonight, let's change that.

Do you use a security application?

One of any type -- a malware scanner, a remote lock and wipe tool, a "find my phone" tool, or even a net nanny app for the kids. If you use one, let us know!

 

Do you use a "security" app?

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2 years ago

HTC shows off the 'Micro Arc Oxidation' process used on the One S

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

HTC is mighty proud of the Micro Arc Oxidation process they use on the upcoming HTC One S. Based on what we've seen from hands-on time with the S, we think they have good reason. The process turns the aircraft-grade aluminum into something that looks and feels like ceramic, and gives the S a new sleek look that gets more than a few of us interested. They showed a bit of how it works during their Mobile World Congress presentation, and now they have given us a 98 second look at the process and some behind the scenes info. Have a look, the "awesome lightning striking the phone" is pretty cool to watch. We'll be able to see how nice the finish is ourselves soon enough, as the One S will be hitting the shelves in Europe and the U.S. this spring.

Source: Youtube

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2 years ago

PlayStation Store and games now available on Sony Xperia S

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For whatever reason, Sony wasn't able to finish up PlayStation support for the Xperia S before the phone hit store shelves in Europe. Today, though, that placeholder link in the Xperia S app drawer now loads a web page where the PlayStation Store and PS Pocket app can be downloaded. The same goes for the Xperia S's Japanese counterpart, the Acro HD, which launched in late February.

To get your fill of classic 32-bit titles, you'll first need to enable non-Market applications in Settings > Applications, then run "Let's start PS store" in the app tray. Next, download the two apps, which in turn will let you buy and play games. We're seeing around a dozen titles available on our review unit, though some of those are still only playable on the Xperia Play. And it should be noted that you'll need a PlayStation Network or Sony Entertainment Network account to access Sony's mobile gaming catalog.

The manufacturer plans to bring PS certification to all its 2012 phones, including the Xperia P, U, Ion and the recently-announced Xperia Sola.

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2 years ago

Radio transplant brings AT&T Galaxy Note to life on T-Mobile's '4G' HSPA+

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Since it emerged that the AT&T Galaxy Note's hardware supported T-Mobile's HSPA frequencies, there's been a cash bounty out for anyone able to bring Tmo 3G and '4G' connectivity to the device. Now it may be time for someone to collect that reward, as a method involving copying over parts of radio firmware from other devices has resulted in success.

The method, discovered by hacker 'Tomin.FHL,' requires users with rooted, SIM-unlocked AT&T Notes to download and flash specific parts of a radio file from another phone through ClockworkMod recovery. And that's pretty much it. Though obviously you'll well and truly void your warranty in the process, which means you'll be on your own if something goes wrong (like, say, bricking your phone because you flashed a hacked radio onto it).

Over on XDA​, various forum members have tried the hack with varying levels of success. The general consensus seems to be that it works, though you can expect slower HSPA data rates than you'd get on an officially-sanctioned Tmo device. If you're understand the risks, you'll find more info over at the source link.

Source: XDA; via: TechCrunch

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2 years ago

Why to use a secure lockscreen [security and privacy]

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We've talked before about how to set up your Android phone with a secure lockscreen, and today we're going to talk about why you should do it. We're all concerned about our privacy and security when it comes to our smartphones and connected devices, and the first step is to take whatever measures are available to us and put them to good use. It's not very wise to sit back and complain about the security issues if we're not willing to take any steps ourselves to keep things private. Ultimately, we as users are responsible for security and privacy on our phones. 

A rally against an application, or our carriers, for privacy concerns is all well and good. It's something we all need to concern ourselves with, and be armed with as much information as possible. But in the end, we have to make the final decisions about what we feel is secure and what isn't. A good start is to keep your private information safe in the event that you lose your phone or it gets stolen. It happens -- it's happened to me, it's likely happened to more than a few of you. You either leave your phone behind somewhere and it's gone when you go looking for it, or some unsavory type takes it upon himself to make your property disappear. A couple years back I was relieved of my laptop and briefcase containing two smartphones in a parking garage, and after the initial period of anger and shock I instantly worried about the fellow having access to my information -- not the equipment itself. Luckily, everything was password locked and I don't think any of my precious data made its way into someone else's hands. The laptop and phones were replaced, and all was well.

That scenario would have played out a good bit differently had the phones been left unprotected. Besides my personal information (which I certainly don't want anyone to have access to) I had business contacts, documents that were covered under an NDA, and other information that would have caused quite a stir if it had ended up in the wrong hands. Companies -- even and especially the one you work for -- take that sort of thing pretty damn seriously, and they should. That means you should. Whether it's some sort of trade secrets, sensitive financial data, or just information about your family, you don't want someone getting hold of it. Would you want someone horrible enough to steal your phone knowing which school your kids attend, or your Mom's address? What about your banking information, or your work email? Just because you have nothing to hide doesn't mean you shouldn't care. If you think cancelling and replacing credit cards and your drivers license is a pain when you lose your wallet, imagine what it's like trying to fix things when your Google account has been compromised. Or your PayPal account. Or even Facebook. 

Yes, it's inconvenient to have to type in a PIN or passcode every time you unlock your phone. It's also inconvenient to pay your car insurance every month. But when the time comes that you need either, you'll be glad you did.

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2 years ago

HTC One S rooted before release with Modaco Superboot

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Much like the HTC One X that saw root come by way of MoDaCo's Superboot previously, the HTC One S has also been given the same treatment. All the same rules apply here as they did for the One X, meaning you'll be needing a device with S-OFF in order to get this to work and since HTC doesn't ship devices with their bootloaders unlocked, we'll have to wait and see how quick they offer up usage of the bootloader unlock tool. Unless of course, someone takes it upon themselves to beat them to the punch. In either case, whenever S-OFF can be achieved on the retail units you'll only need to load up the MoDaCo Superboot and you'll have root.

Download: MoDaCo

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2 years ago

Tag Heuer launching eye-wateringly priced Android smartphone

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Are you in the market for a truly exclusive Android smartphone? Money not an issue? Well luxury Swiss watch maker Tag Heuer have just the device for you. Their latest creation is called the Racer, it does run Android, and will cost a staggering €2800 ($3670).

So what does all that money actually buy? No plastic for one. The Racer is constructed from carbon fiber and titanium, protected by a shockproof rubber chassis. With its exposed screws and "avant-garde communication" labeling, the Racer certainly looks expensive. 

Curiously -- and despite having the four buttons on the front -- we're promised the "latest Android software" on the Racer. For the price though you would have to say that a little Ice Cream Sandwich is the least you deserve. Specs are pretty sparse -- read non-existent -- at this stage, but we are promised a "new customizable 3D user interface to fit the individual needs of each owner." 

CrackBerry Kevin's beloved Porsche Design BlackBerry P'9981 has itself some company in the exclusive, ridiculously expensive, designer smartphone market. The Racer is due in July, and to get one you'll be visiting one of Tag Heuer's own boutiques, selected watch and jewelry retailers and luxury mobile boutiques. Definitely no Best Buy on this one. Check out a short promo video after the break. 

Source: Tag Heuer

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2 years ago

T-Mobile HSPA+ lights up in 8 new cities

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T-Mobile today announced that it's flipped the switch on its HSPA+ 4G network on eight new cities. They are:

  • Abilene, Texas
  • Amarillo, Texas
  • Odessa, Texas
  • Victoria, Texas
  • Bakersfield, Calif.
  • Eau Claire, Wis.
  • Joplin, Mo.
  • St. Joseph, Mo.

T-Mobile CTO Neville Ray in a blog post also says that the company's priority is now on prepping for an LTE rollout in 2013, and that it'll be "well positioned and ready to move to LTE Advanced" beyond that.

More: T-Mobile

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2 years ago

HTC Velocity 4G ICS update now rolling out in Australia

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Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich for the HTC Velocity 4G (that's the international version of AT&T's Vivid) has started to push out to handsets on the Telstra network in Australia, according to reports. Aussie blog Ausdroid.net reports that in addition to ICS, the update brings the LTE-connected phone up to HTC Sense 3.6. That's the same version of HTC's UX layer that arrived on European Sensations last week, including a few tweaks here and there, but not the complete overhaul offered by the upcoming Sense 4.0.

If you're a Velocity owner in Australia, you can get your hands on the latest version by heading to Settings > About phone > Software updates and tapping "check for updates."

Source: Ausdroid.net

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2 years ago

Xperia Sola gets an early hands-on, shows glove-friendly touchscreen

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The Sony Xperia Sola has been official for just a few hours, but already an early hands-on video has surfaced, showing the (dual-core) mid-range smartphone's unique profile and "floating touch" technology. As we said in our announcement post, this is an extension of touchscreen technology which allows the device to sense when your finger is hovering over the screen. Sony's been keen to show off how this can allow you to use your finger like a "cursor" in the web browser, but the hands-on video shows a different use -- allowing touch input through clothing (i.e. gloves), even using non-capacitive materials.

We've got no idea what kind of black magic Sony is channeling to make this work, but we'll admit to being impressed. And we're hopeful that many more uses of this tech will present themselves as the Xperia Sola approaches its Q2 release window.

We've got the video embedded after the break.

Source: AndroidNext.de

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