Android 3.x - Honeycomb - Featured Articles

ZTE Optik

ZTE Optik review (Sprint)

The ZTE Optik is a nice little surprise from Sprint. It's an unassuming but well-built and well-running 7-inch Honeycomb tablet that runs on Sprint's 3G network, and it is probably one of the better devices nobody has heard much about. With no gimmicks like a digital stylus or a foldable keyboard...
Team Viewer for Meetings

TeamViewer for Meetings updated with VoIP support

The folks at Teamviewer have pushed out quite the update for their TeamViewer for Meetings app, bringing some minor bug fixes, full hardware acceleration for Honeycomb and Ice Cream Sandwich tablets, and VoIP support. VoIP support on top of the already excellent Teleconferencing application really...
ZTE optik

ZTE Optik getting a minor update, brings some fixes and enhancements

Sprint is pushing out a small update for the 7-inch ZTE Optik today, bringing a few welcome bug fixes to the tablet and some decent software enhancements. According to the official changelog, we should be seeing the following: Google DRM solution Google Music Google+ Persistent...

Android 3.x - Honeycomb - Photos

Android 3.x - Honeycomb RSS Feed

One of the cool new ways we can interact with applications in Honeycomb is with "fragments."  Have a look at the Honeycomb event video, then check them out in real world use in CNN's new Android app and the upcoming Sports Illustrated app.  From the videos, it looks like the perfect way to handle a lot of content in an organized and easy to navigate way. 

But that's all geared towards honeycomb's new tablet interface.  What about smartphones?  Googler and Android software engineer Dianne Hackborn let us in on how fragments are going to work on your phone in a new post on the Android Developers blog.  There's a lot of technical information there, and if you're even the least bit inclined you should make sure to read it all, but the nutshell version is that fragments are coming to smartphones.  Google has spent time to make them easy to program, even giving an excellent tutorial developers can use with the Android 3.0 preview to get started.  And the best news?  The plan is to make the new APIs backwards compatible to Android 1.6, so most phones (sorry Moto Cliq users), even older models, will reap the benefit.

The last big question is, "when is all this coming?" -- Dianne has answered us in advance:

We don’t have a firm date for when this library will be available, but it should be relatively soon. In the meantime, you can start developing with fragments on Android 3.0 to see how they work, and most of that effort should be transferable.

[Android Developers blog]

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

We've had a few people ask us recently if it's possible to have one on-screen keyboard appear for a certain app, and another keyboard appear for a different app, automatically. As it stands now, you have long-press and go through a couple menus to switch keyboards, and that makes it a bit of a pain.

But in Android 3.0 Honeycomb, the process has been significantly improved.

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Did you miss our live coverage or just want to see all of Google's Honeycomb demos shown in video format? Well, Google has your back and has posted a video of their entire Honeycomb event on to YouTube. The video will run just over 50 minutes but is well worth the time as Google employees and guests show off apps, widgets, multitasking, notifications, and more. (And see if you can spot Phil!) [YouTube]

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We had a look at Fuze Meeting for Android when it kicked things up a notch and released a tablet-specific application, and now they have gone a step further.  Fuze Meeting will be the first collaboration application for Honeycomb, delivering HD mobile video, full hosting abilities and pinch-to-zoom and iPoint laser technology for the Motorola Xoom.

Fuze Box says that hosts and attendees will be able to view up to 10 high resolution videos in a single instance of the app, which should give the new rendering engine in Honeycomb a run for it's money.  If they can pull it off well, this will make the Motorola Xoom a serious business tool, and a true competitor to the iPad.  Hit the break for the full press release.

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We've live from Google HQ in Mountain View, Calif., for the Android 3.0 Honeycomb event. We're expecting another look at the Tablet OS, and, who knows, maybe a few surprises. Join us after the break for live coverage of the event!

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As we get set for the Honeycomb event today we figured we'd share this awesome new live wallpaper with you all since, this event is the reason it was created. Honeycomb wall is a new live wallpaper that is now available for download in the Android Market which adds an embedded calendar and clock to your home screen as well as plenty of honeycomb bees that fly around. If you opt for the donation version you'll get some added features:

  • Buzzing, touchable bees
  • Battery level indicator
  • Set own image background
  • On device editor to change bees location, size, etc

All in all it's pretty awesome to say the least. The donation version does cost $.99 cents in the Android Market but that's a rather small price to be paying for something this cool. Video and download can be found after the break. [Android Central forums]

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If you were holding off on the Honeycomb port for Nook Color because some pretty major features like sound and SD card storage weren't working, then it might be time to start downloading.  The SD card image (from developer deeper-blue) has been updated after only a day to take care of both of those issues.

At this point, the most glaring omission is root access, but considering we've gone from Google releasing their Honeycomb SDK preview to having a ROM that's pretty much ready for daily use in less than a week is quite a testament to this mysterious developer from Chicago.

Head on over to our How-To thread in the forums for the download and all the details--then follow along at home on our live blog of Google's "introduction" to Honeycomb today.  [xda-developers]

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At long last, after the tease at CES, T-Mobile has finally given details on its Android tablet -- the LG G-Slate. And we're simultaneously scratching our heads and dying to get our hands on this thing. Let's dive into the bullet points.

  • 8.9-inch "3D-capable multitouch display" -- with the aid of 3D glasses
  • Android 3.0 Honeycomb
  • Nvidia Tegra 2 dual-core processor
  • Rear-facing stereoscopic video recorder, records at 1080p
  • 5MP camera with LED flash
  • 720p playback on the tablet, 1080p via HDMI output
  • 32GB of internal memory
  • Internal gyroscope, accelerometer
  • T-Mobile HSPA+ data, plus Wifi

That definitely sounds like quite the beast. We're going to withhold judgment on the whole 3D screen and video recording thing (and we might well get a look at both during Google's Honeycomb event). We just have to hope that it's better than what we saw from the Sharp Galapogos at CES -- and even then we might still need some convincing.

No word yet on official pricing and availability, though March 23 has been rumored. Check out the full presser after the break. [T-Mobile G-Slate product page]

Discuss everything G-Slate in the T-Mobile G-Slate forums

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The Nook Color port of the Honeycomb SDK preview has been released to the public, and is now available for installation.

Currently set up to run off of an SD card, the ROM (from developer deeper-blue) has the following working already:

  • Graphics acceleration
  • Accelerometer
  • Wireless
  • Touchscreen
  • Buttons
  • Sleep/Wake

You can download the SD image here, and then check out our How-To Install Honeycomb on the Nook Color thread so you can follow along at home when Google previews it tomorrow.  [xda-developers]

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While nobody is quite sure why (none of us, anyway), the Honeycomb SDK preview seems to have gone AWOL for most everyone looking for it.  We started to get tips and questions Saturday evening, then some chatter showed up about it in the Android-Developers Google group, and our friends over at Android Community noticed the same thing.  At first, you could uninstall the whole SDK and reinstall it all at once as a work-around, but now even that doesn't seem to be working.  Guess about what's happening all seem to center around Google's event on Feb 2, which should answer a lot of our questions about Honeycomb.  Phil will be there, and all of us will be watching and we'll keep you updated as it happens. [Android-Developers; Android Community]

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This one just keeps getting better and better.  First, photos were posted of Android 3.0 Honeycomb booting on the Nook Color, then the developer posted a video of Honeycomb booting, and now a new video has surfaced that shows Honeycomb in much more action on his, erm, "e-reader."

Since the first video, dev deeper-blue now has graphics acceleration "more or less working."  While still an early build with laggy touchscreen response, he obviously has gotten a lot working in the mere four days since the SDK preview was released! [xda-developers

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Not content with merely releasing the Android 3.0 SDK, Google's invited a smattering of press to its Mountain View campus on Feb. 2 for a closer look at Honeycomb. Didn't get your invite? That's OK, because the entire shindig's going to be streamed at YouTube.com/android.

The event starts at 1 p.m. EST, 10 a.m. PST, and is expected to last about an hour and a half.

It should be interesting to see just how much more Google shows us of Honeycomb; they've slowly been lifting the veil since CES earlier this month. Will we see more for tablets? Honeycomb for phones? We'll find out Wednesday. [via Engadget]

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The turn-around time between source releases and dev community releases seems to be shrinking more and more these days.  Just two days after Google released the Honeycomb SDK Preview, dev deeper-blue now has a (very early) port of it running on his Nook Color.

Originally describing it as a "zombie" without any touchscreen or hardware acceleration, he later reported that he has the touchscreen working and hopes to work on acceleration over the weekend.

While this won't be able to escalate into full-blown Honeycomb on the Nook until after Google releases the full source (presumably sometime after the release of the Motorola Xoom), this could be quite a treat for those itching for the buzz of Android 3.0.   [xda-developers]

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Only three days left to enter to win a Motorola Xoom!

The Motorola Xoom is looking to be the Android tablet to beat so far -- check out of first look at CES. And if the rumors are correct, it could well be launched in the next few weeks on Verizon.

And that means it's time to give one away. We're teaming up with Wyse Technology, developer of the Pocket Cloud app, to deliver one unactivated -- and free -- Motorola Xoom tablet, running the Honeycomb version of Android. Hit the break for the full details and instructions on how to enter.

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We've walked you through Android 3.0 Honeycomb. We've given you Honeycomb wallpapers. And now it's time for Honeycomb screen shots. Below are a culmination of wandering through the Android 3.0 SDK preview. Things may well change by the final release, but this should give you a very basic look at what's to come.

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Click me for the real thing!

Sure, that Honeycomb Easter egg is pretty awesome. But it's even more awesome as a wallpaper. So we've got it, Lloyd, and all the default wallpapers from the Android 3.0 SDK preview packaged all nice and neat into a single downloadable file, ready for you to put on your Android smartphone, tablet, or, hell, on your computer. Only one place to get 'em -- in the Android Central Forums. Thanks, Matt!

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Remember the Easter egg in Gingerbread? There's also one lurking in Honeycomb. Not quite as scary as its Gingerbread counterpart, but no less cool. Thanks, Matt!

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We got our first real taste of Android 3.0 -- "Honeycomb" -- on the Motorola Xoom tablet during CES in early January. It's a pretty big leap from the Android we know and love today, to be sure. But most of what we saw were demonstrations, video of what Honeycomb can and will do.

But today Google released a preview of the Android 3.0 software development kit -- the tools developers need to make applications. Along with the updated SDK, Google's compiled an excellent highlights package. Join us after the break where we'll walk you through the some of the major changes, and what we can expect in the coming year.

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It pays to listen to Motorola Mobility's quarterly earnings calls, because new CEO Sanjay Jha (OK, old CEO, but new CEO of the newly separate MM ... you know what we mean) dropped a little news on a couple of devices you might care about.

The Motorola Atrix 4G is due on AT&T by the end of February, he said. The Xoom could be late February or March (Verizon's said Q1 from the outset, so Jha's hedge is safe either way). The LTE-capable Droid Bionic's slated for the end of the second quarter, as is the hardware upgrade (whatever that ends up being) for the Xoom to get LTE data. Good news, indeed.

Oh, and highlights of the earnings report:

  • Revenue accrual of $3.4 billion, which is 21% higher than Q4 2009
  • Mobile devices comprised of $2.4 billion of that revenue, which is up 33% from 2009
  • 4.9 million smartphones were shipped
  • Operating cash revenue sits at $225 million

Full announcement's after the break. [Motorola]

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Google just announced Android 3.0 Honeycomb and has released a preview of the SDK to go along with it. Here are the big points:

  • A new "holographic" user interface and interaction model -- what we've seen on the Motorola Xoom.
  • UI framework for creating great apps for larger screen devices.
  • High-performance 2D and 3D graphics.
  • Support for multicore processor architectures.
  • Rich multimedia: New multimedia features such as HTTP Live streaming support, a pluggable DRM framework, and easy media file transfer through MTP/PTP, give developers new ways to bring rich content to users.
  • New types of connectivity: New APIs for Bluetooth A2DP and HSP let applications offer audio streaming and headset control. Support for Bluetooth insecure socket connection lets applications connect to simple devices that may not have a user interface.
  • Enhancements for enterprise: New administrative policies, such as for encrypted storage and password expiration, help enterprise administrators manage devices more effectively.

That's quite the laundry list, indeed! We're going to dive into this. [Android Developers Blog]

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