Best Wear OS watch 2024

If you're an Android user on the hunt for a new wearable, you can't do much better than get the best Wear OS watch out of the many great options detailed below. This category has expanded well beyond the realm of popular names like Google and Samsung, with countless brands now incorporating the software into their watches. 

Wear OS continues to make big strides in terms of features and functionality as well. So, even if you don't know where to start, we've tested some of the best Wear OS watches out there to help you make the right choice. Whether you want the latest and greatest or don't mind saving some cash by going for a slightly older model, there are quite a few Wear OS smartwatches available out there.

Photo of Michael Hicks, Senior Editor of Android Central
Michael Hicks

Michael Hicks is Android Central's resident smartwatch geek, having reviewed or tested dozens of wearables from Samsung, Google, Apple, Garmin, Fitbit, Coros, Polar, Withings, Amazfit, and others. He spends his free time running or hiking while wearing several watches at once, testing which is most accurate.

At a glance

Best overall

Samsung Galaxy Watch 6

(Image credit: Nicholas Sutrich / Android Central)
Best overall

Specifications

Display: 1.3-inch (40mm), 1.5-inch (44mm) AMOLED
Size: 40mm, 44mm
Processor: Exynos W930
RAM: 2GB
Storage: 16GB
Battery: 300mAh (40mm), 425mAh (44mm)
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, LTE (optional)
Water-resistance: IP68 + 5ATM
Colors: Graphite, Gold (40mm), Silver (44mm)

Reasons to buy

+
GPS, HRM, NFC, SpO2, BIA, temperature
+
Better display
+
Improved performance
+
Charges quickly
+
Two size options
+
Sapphire glass display

Reasons to avoid

-
Mostly an incremental update over the last model
-
Battery life isn't exactly the best

Launched recently, the Samsung Galaxy Watch 6 doesn't offer a lot of improvements over its predecessor. In fact, our Galaxy Watch 6 reviewer noted that it's largely an iterative update over the Galaxy Watch 5. However, there's still a lot to like about Samsung's newest smartwatch and for many prospective buyers, that'll be reason enough to make the upgrade.

So, what are these new additions? Comparing Galaxy Watch 6 vs. Galaxy Watch 5, the newest-generation model comes with a marginally better SoC and extra RAM, which give it a slight performance boost over the last-generation smartwatch. You also get bigger displays, even though the case is now a bit thinner. Then there's all the usual good stuff like a truckload of sensors, 10W charging, two size options, and a bunch of different band styles and colors to pick from. All these goodies make the Galaxy Watch 6 the best Android smartwatch you can get in the market today.

However, the Galaxy Watch 6 does have a few shortcomings as well. First off, it still comes with the same set of sensors as the previous model did. The internal storage is also the same, and the GPS accuracy could use some improvements. But what's the worst is the battery life estimates, which fall short of expectations. For example, GPS-tracked activities can drain almost 25 percent of the smartwatch's battery, while sleep-tracking takes up 20 to 30 percent of the battery. This means you'll probably need to juice up this thing multiple times a day in case you're a heavy user.

Best design

Google Pixel Watch 2 review

Best design

Specifications

Display: 1.2-inch AMOLED
Size: 41mm
Processor: Snapdragon W5, Cortex M33
RAM: 2GB
Storage: 32GB
Battery: 306mAh
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, LTE (optional)
Water-resistance: IP68 + 5ATM
Colors: Polished Silver, Matte Black, Champagne Gold

Reasons to buy

+
Sleek edge-to-edge display
+
Better performance over previous model
+
Pixel phone not required
+
Fitbit Premium integration
+
Speedy Wear OS updates
+
Recharge using Fitbit Sense 2/Versa 4 chargers

Reasons to avoid

-
Not compatible with first Pixel Watch charger
-
Only one size available

Google following up its first smartwatch with a sequel in the Pixel Watch 2 that looks like a clone. Choosing not to tinker much with the overall design, the focus instead lay with the functionality. One of the biggest off the bat is that you no longer have to reset the watch when switching or transferring to a new phone. Now, once you make the switch, pair the watch with the new device and you pick up where you left off. 

Our Pixel Watch 2 review outlines all the ways that it improved over its predecessor, keeping the parts that worked and adding or improving on those that didn't. It's very comfortable to wear, and its rounded display gives it a sleek look we appreciate. Plus, the haptics for notifications remain sublime. Third-party apps look great, Fitbit integration is excellent, and performance stays smooth throughout. Using the new Snapdragon W5 chipset is a big reason why, ensuring a stability that wasn't always there in the original Pixel Watch. 

The beauty of all this is that you don't need a Pixel phone to benefit from all the features, meaning Google doesn't keep any locked or tucked away. Changing the charger, however, maybe not so much. The Pixel Watch 2 uses a proprietary wireless charging base, though you can use the ones made for the Fitbit Sense 2 or Versa 4 as alternatives if you have them handy. 

Best ultra premium

Samsung Galaxy Watch 5 Pro sitting on tree leaves, showing app tiles.

(Image credit: Michael Hicks / Android Central)
Best premium Wear OS watch

Specifications

Display: 1.4-inch Super AMOLED
Size: 45mm
Processor: Exynos W920
RAM: 2GB
Storage: 16GB
Battery: 590mAh
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, LTE (optional)
Water-resistance: IP68 + 5ATM
Colors: Black Titanium, Gray Titanium

Reasons to buy

+
GPS, HRM, NFC, SpO2, BIA, temperature
+
Titanium case & sapphire glass
+
3-day battery life
+
10W charging speed
+
New .GPX hiking maps

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive and heavy
-
Very thick design that's not suited for sleep tracking

Most Wear OS watches will last a day at most with features like continuous heart rate active. But the massive Galaxy Watch 5 Pro genuinely lasts three days with all health sensors and sleep tracking active, and it has the same speedy charging as the standard Galaxy Watch 5. The only issue with it, as our Galaxy Watch 5 Pro review explains, is that the extra battery capacity corresponds with a very thick and heavy design that not everyone will enjoy. Interestingly, a comparison between the Galaxy Watch 5 Pro vs. Galaxy Watch 6 Classic shows that the recently launched model is even thicker and heavier, probably due to its stainless-steel case and rotating bezel.

With the same size display as the Galaxy Watch 5 44mm, the Pro model is a lot more expensive and doesn't have too many upgrades over the base model, aside from the battery. Its Titanium case should handle whatever damage you encounter, and the Pro design also has an elevated case that protects the display from scratches.

Along with the TicWatch Pro 3 Ultra (another pick on this list), the Pro is a watch that you'll buy specifically because of how long it lasts per charge. It doesn't have the rotating bezel that has made its return with the Galaxy Watch 6 Classic. Instead, it relies on the digital touch bezel of other Galaxy Watches. If you'd prefer that, you may want to downgrade/upgrade based on your budget. 

Best value

TicWatch E3 watch face

(Image credit: Chris Wedel / Android Central)
Best value

Specifications

Display: 1.3-inch AMOLED
Size: 44mm
Processor: Snapdragon Wear 4100
RAM: 1GB
Storage: 8GB
Battery: 380mAh
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
Water-resistance: IP68 + 5ATM
Colors: Panther Black

Reasons to buy

+
GPS, HRM, NFC
+
Activity/health tracking
+
Built-in mic/speaker
+
Google Assistant
+
Ultra-smooth performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Bulky bezel
-
Mediocre battery life
-
Still waiting for Wear OS 3

Our TicWatch E3 review lays out all the simple perks of this model. For starters, it has a large and bright 1.3-inch HD display, encompassed by a rather large and bulky bezel that you'll either love or hate, depending on your preferences. Fortunately, the watch is compatible with 20mm interchangeable bands, so swapping it out for a new one is never going to be an issue. It offers IP68 water resistance and is suitable for pool swimming. Thanks to the Wear 4100 chip and 1GB of RAM, we found "little to no delay in opening apps or loading up the Play Store on the watch," while the battery life lasts 1.5 days even with 24-hour HRM and SpO2 tracking, AOD, and sleep tracking. Or you can use Essential mode, which uses tilt-to-wake and still tracks heart rate and sleep and extend your battery life to a full 20 days per charge (in our tests).

You get more than your share of features on the health and fitness side of things. The Mobvoi TicWatch E3 offers onboard GPS, activity tracking, heart-rate monitoring, sleep tracking, and more. There are a few extra perks, such as Google Assistant and Google Pay. These are all fantastic additions, but the short battery life is a drawback. This is not unheard of for Wear OS watches, though. If you can live with that and the chunky bezel, this is an incredible value that's hard to beat. 

Best battery life

OnePlus Watch 2 custom watch face

(Image credit: Apoorva Bhardwaj / Android Central)
Best battery life

Specifications

Display: 1.43-inch AMOLED
Size: 47mm
Processor: Snapdragon W5 Gen 1
RAM: 2GB
Storage: 32GB
Battery: 500mAh
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
Water-resistance: IP68 + 5ATM
Colors: Black Steel, Radiant Steel

Reasons to buy

+
Very nice stainless steel design
+
Fantastic battery life
+
Runs both Wear OS and lightweight RTOS
+
Large AMOLED display
+
Pretty rugged body
+
32GB internal storage

Reasons to avoid

-
No LTE variant
-
Crown should do more
-
Notifications need consistency

The OnePlus Watch 2 isn't without its challenges, as we noted in our review, but the upside is considerable for this good-looking Wear OS watch. Its dual-chip design is unique in that it delivers the power and versatility of Wear OS with the efficiency that comes with RTOS, an older interface that focuses on background tasks. There's only one size and no LTE variant, but there's also no doubt the Watch 2 will look good on any wrist.

While the entire software layout feels generally intuitive — especially given how nicely Wear OS and RTOS integrate — it's odd OnePlus would choose not to integrate the digital crown more into navigating things onscreen. It may have a large AMOLED display, but the crown is conveniently positioned to scroll up and down as well. Notifications come through smoothly except for the times they don't seem to make it to the watch. These are fixable points via software update, so hopefully OnePlus works out the kinks and improves what is an already solid smartwatch. Battery life is outstanding for Wear OS, lasting at least a full day longer than competitors before you need to recharge. All that despite the various activity tracking features available, and the third-party app access afforded by the Play Store. With 32GB of internal storage, there's plenty of room to install apps and save music playlists directly to the Watch 2.

Best last-gen

Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 Classic taking a BIA sensor reading

(Image credit: Daniel Bader / Android Central)
Former best, now discounted

Specifications

Display: 1.2-inch, 1.4-inch AMOLED
Size: 40mm/44mm (Watch 4), 42mm/46mm (Classic)
Processor: Exynos W920
RAM: 1.5GB
Storage: 16GB
Battery: 247mAh (40mm), 361mAh (44mm)
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, LTE (optional)
Water-resistance: IP68 + 5ATM
Colors: Black, Silver, Pink Gold, Green (Watch 4), Black, Silver (Classic)

Reasons to buy

+
GPS, HRM, NFC, SpO2, BIA
+
Thinner, more comfortable than GW5
+
Classic design has rotating bezel
+
Huge array of health sensors
+
Several size & bezel options
+
Cheaper, same chipset as GW5

Reasons to avoid

-
No temperature sensor
-
Poorer materials than GW5

The Galaxy Watch 5 is still a great Wear OS watch, but it doesn't come with that many upgrades over the Galaxy Watch 4, which also runs Wear OS 3 and has the same Exynos W920 SoC, along with 1.5GB of RAM and 16GB of storage as its successor. Now that it's frequently on sale for much less than its launch price, even more so after the recent launch of the Galaxy Watch 6 series, the Galaxy Watch 4 continues to be worth buying if you're looking to save money without compromising on quality.

In our Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 review, we praised the performance, design, health features, and battery life, but had a complicated view of its Wear OS integration that stuck pretty close to the Tizen template. But Samsung has made plenty of upgrades since then, and it now runs the same One UI 4.5 Watch OS as the Galaxy Watch 5, complete with Google Assistant support. It may not have a temperature sensor like the Galaxy Watch 5, but that's still inactive on the newer model, and it otherwise has the same tools: A 3-in-1 BioActive sensor measures optical heart rate, electrical heart (ECG), blood pressure, and Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) for a holistic look at your health, including body water and fat percentage, skeletal muscle mass, basal metabolic rate, and more. Plus, the Galaxy Watch 4 Classic kept the rotating bezel that Samsung popularized with the older models — something totally abandoned by the Galaxy Watch 5 Pro design — only to be brought back with 2023's Galaxy Watch 6 Classic. 

Best style

Skagen Falster Gen 6 health data

(Image credit: Derrek Lee / Android Central)
Best style

Specifications

Display: 1.28-inch AMOLED
Size: 42mm
Processor: Snapdragon Wear 4100+
RAM: 1GB
Storage: 8GB
Battery: 300mAh
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
Water-resistance: No IP rating, 3ATM
Colors: Black, Silver, Charcoal

Reasons to buy

+
GPS, HRM, NFC
+
SpO2 tracking
+
Sleek, attractive design
+
Built-in mic/speaker
+
Google Assistant

Reasons to avoid

-
Short battery life
-
No Wear OS 3 yet

Skagen has a knack for delivering stylish wearables, and the Scandanavian-inspired Falster Gen 6 design is no exception. It comes in a sleek 41mm stainless steel case and works with all 20mm bands. The 1.28-inch AMOLED display is accompanied by two push buttons on the side and a rotating home button. Thankfully, the updated Snapdragon Wear 4100+ processor doesn't just offer smooth performance; it also ensures the Skagen Falster Gen 6 will eventually get upgraded to Wear OS 3, if not newer version(s). 

Our Skagen Falster Gen 6 review broke down the many perks that come with this Fossil spin-off. We like the Fossil Wellness app that showcases data from automatic sleep tracking and the new SpO2 sensor, with the results broken down into daily, weekly, and monthly stats. Thanks to the processor, we found that it has "smooth navigation and relatively quick app startups," even with the older Wear OS 2.3. And the watch can go from zero to 80 percent charged in just about 30 minutes, which somewhat compensates for the strict one-day battery life.

Best lifestyle watch

Fossil Gen 6 Wellness Edition on a tree branch

(Image credit: Derrek Lee / Android Central)
Best lifestyle watch

Specifications

Display: 1.1-inch E Ink with backlight
Size: 44mm
Processor: Snapdragon Wear 4100+
RAM: 1GB
Storage: 8GB
Battery: 300mAh
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
Water-resistance: No IP rating, 3ATM
Colors: Black, Navy, Blush

Reasons to buy

+
GPS, HRM, NFC
+
Multiple design options
+
Improved health tracking
+
Wear OS 3 now available
+
Fast charging speeds

Reasons to avoid

-
Wear OS 3 removed Google Assistant (for now)
-
Short battery life

Are you interested in finding a wearable that blends stunning design elements with a solid set of smartwatch perks? If so, the Fossil Gen 6 Wellness Edition may be what you're searching for. This release from Fossil offers improved performance, as well as fast charging speeds, accurate health tracking, and more. It's very similar to the original Fossil Gen 6, but with a new 44mm case and stainless-steel finish that's very attractive. 

One of the most notable improvements to the Fossil Gen 6 is that it's equipped with the Qualcomm Snapdragon 4100+ chipset, so performance is smooth and seamless. Additionally, the 1.7GHz co-processor allows the smartwatch to use always-on health metrics without negatively affecting performance or draining the battery life. You'll get more detailed heart rate readings, more precise sleep tracking, and better health statistics all around. 

While the Fossil Gen 6 is an excellent lifestyle smartwatch, there's one thorn in this wearable's side that has yet to go away: battery life. Our reviewer said he had to charge his watch once or twice a day, which is only bearable because its charging speed is extremely fast, hitting 80 percent in 30 minutes. Also, Google is working on making Google Assistant available on Wear OS 3 watches with Qualcomm chips, so you're stuck with Alexa for the time being. 

Choosing the best Wear OS watch for you

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As you can see, Wear OS covers quite a bit of ground in the wearable market. While it might be slightly different from the Wear OS experience you're used to, the latest and greatest Samsung Galaxy Watch 6 is the best option simply because it offers just about everything from an assortment of health sensors to Google Assistant support, all in a nice design. And since it's backed by Google, that'll be helpful for Samsung to get new software updates just as quickly as Google's own smartwatch.

Speaking of which, you can pick the Pixel Watch 2 instead, which is what we'd suggest if you want something a bit more stylish or care about Fitbit integration. But that'll cost you a bit more and lacks a larger display option than 1.2 inches. You might come across a discount, but if not, Samsung is the way to go.

Michael L Hicks
Senior Editor, VR/AR and fitness

Michael is Android Central's resident expert on fitness tech and wearables, with an enthusiast's love of VR tech on the side. After years freelancing for Techradar, Wareable, Windows Central, Digital Trends, and other sites on a variety of tech topics, AC has given him the chance to really dive into the topics he's passionate about. He's also a semi-reformed Apple-to-Android user who loves D&D, Star Wars, and Lord of the Rings.

For wearables, Michael has tested dozens of smartwatches from Garmin, Fitbit, Samsung, Apple, COROS, Polar, Amazfit, and other brands, and will always focus on recommending the best product over the best brand. He's also completed marathons like NYC, SF, Marine Corps, Big Sur, and California International — though he's still trying to break that 4-hour barrier.

With contributions from