Gingerbread - Android 2.3 - Featured Articles

Android Central

Motorola XPRT update brings Gingerbread and bugfixes

The Motorola XPRT, that BlackBerry-like keyboard phone on Sprint, has finally made its move to Android 2.3 Gingerbread. Along with bumping up to the next platform version, the update brings a decent grouping of bug fixes for the device: Email User Interface fixes. Contact User Interface...
Aston Martin Aspire

Aston Martin gets in on the luxury smartphone act, high on price, low on specs

Not content with producing some of the the worlds most beautiful cars, Aston Martin has decided to get in on the luxury smartphone space with this. Known as the Aspire, the device packs Android 2.3.5, an 800MHz processor, a paultry 256MB of RAM and a 3.2 inch HVGA display. Right. Choice of colors...
Android Central

Carphone Warehouse offers Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 and Galaxy Y phone for £15.50 p.m.

UK retailer the Carphone Warehouse is kicking off its latest “Smart Deal” by giving customers the chance to pick up an entry-level Android phone and an entry-level tablet for a mere £15.50 per month. The deal runs from today until next Thursday, Aug. 23, and if you take up the £15.50 per month...

Gingerbread - Android 2.3 - Top Articles

HTC Evo 4G

Apps crashed most on Gingerbread, but Android is consistently more stable than iOS according to report

Samsung Galaxy S4 was most stable device, while the iPad 2 was the least stable It's probably no surprise, but Android 2.3 Gingerbread was the least stable version of Android when it comes to causing app crashes. That's all improved since, however — according to a report from Crittercism, which...
BBM

BBM for Android now compatible with Gingerbread

Thank you so much blackberry team. I was waiting this app. Its really great user friendly and smooth. Via: CrackBerry
BBM Gingerbread

BlackBerry to bake version of BBM for Gingerbread phones

Update will bring support for older devices While the folks behind the BBM Twitter account may be making some questionable posts, the team behind the scenes has been hard at work adding support for Gingerbread users. Jeff Gadway of BlackBerry has posted that over the past few months the team has...

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It has been long rumored that Google will release a cloud-based music service that will integrate with Android, with Google having showed off a preview last year at its Google IO dev conference. 

And now a device that claims to run Gingerbread also appears to have a Google Music option in the Data & Synchronization menu. Whether this is a feature we will see with Gingerbread (Android 2.3) or one that we will have to wait for remains to be seen. It is exciting to see that the rumored "Google Music" may come to fruition sooner rather than later. Many of us have been searching for a viable cloud based service that syncs easily with our devices and Google Music could be that; then again, we don't know much about it yet, so stay tuned. [GizmoFusion via Engadget]

Update: Oh, yeah. Forgot. That's a feature that shows up when you install that leaked music app. So not really new, just forgotten.

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There's been much hubbub made this week over a study by Computer World that tracks which phones have been upgraded to Froyo, and how long it took them to receive the update.

Here's a little secret though: That's all it does.

Don't get us wrong, it's nicely done, with easy-to-read charts, and raw data that even this math flunky can understand. But it doesn't predict the future.

Squint at it all you want -- you cannot look at the raw data or bar graphs and predict if your phone is more likely to be upgraded, or which carrier is more likely to upgrade a phone in the future.

Crazy talk, we know. But we'll explain after the break.

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A recent FCC filing for what seems to be an updated model of Samsung's Nexus S has given some credibility to the possible existence of Android 2.4.

Engadget recently noticed the listing for the Samsung GT-i9023, the outline of which appears to perfectly match the current Nexus S. Coincidentally, the Nexus S also happens to have a very similar model number - GT-i9020. In addition, Engadget notes that the GT-i9023 also recently passed Bluetooth SIG and Wi-Fi Alliance certification, so this is definitely a real device.

What makes this story interesting, though, is that it gives weight to a video recently recorded by German tech site BestBoyZ which seems to show a Nexus S running Android 2.4. The baseband version displayed on that phone begins "i9023," which would seem to refer to the new Nexus S model. This is still well within the realms of speculation, but if the GT-i9023 is indeed refreshed Nexus S hardware, then it suddenly becomes pretty reasonable to think it might be running a refreshed version of Android too.

The Nexus S isn't the first device to be caught apparently running Android 2.4. At last week's CES, Sony Ericsson's upcoming Xperia Arc was snapped with "Android version: 2.4" on its "About" screen, though this was later dismissed as a "misconfiguration" by the manufacturer.

You can check out the video of what seems to be the new GT-i9023 model Nexus S running "Android 2.4" after the jump. [FCC via Engadget]

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Yeah, you'll need to take this one with a big grain of salt as some of these rumors have been floating around for a whole now but with that said and out of the way. New information is suggesting that come Mobile World Congress next month, Samsung will be all set to release the Samsung Galaxy S2 line of devices. If we follow the rumor mill, what we should be looking at come announcement is a dual core, 4.3-inch Super AMOLED display with built in NFC rocking Android 2.3. We'll hold out for more details before we set this one in stone personally. Oh ya, the image. We're pretty darn confident in saying the device will look nothing like what's shown above. I'll eat my Jerry's hat if I'm wrong. [ETNews via MobileCrunch]

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Are you a Samsung Nexus S owner who has been experiencing random reboots during calls? If so, you'll be pleased to know that Google has now been able to replicate the issue and is working with Samsung to address it. Although reported a while back, this bug has a history of being noted and then quickly being declined based on the fact Google never felt it was an issue with Gingerbread but rather a manufacturer related issue.

We're guessing the attention given to the SMS bug lately has caused Google to start looking at the communities bug tracking efforts just a little bit harder. At this time, no fix has been issued but hopefully we can expect one very soon now that the reboot issue has been acknowledged. Thanks Andrew! [Google via XDA]

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YouTube link for mobile viewing

Back in December when the Gingerbread SDK was released, some folks found an interesting file hidden deep within.  While we still don't claim to understand this level of artistic genius, at least we know why it was there.  Now if we only knew why it was there.  Check out the video and play along if you have the hardware. [XDA-Developers] Thanks James!

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Engadget scored a lengthy interview with Matias Duarte, Google's Director of User Experience and the man behind much of the UI direction of Android 2.3 Gingerbread and 3.0 Honeycomb.

In one his first interviews since joining Google, Duarte talks about his time at rival Palm, as well as key Gingerbread and Honeycomb design decisions made over the past seven months. Duarte also discusses the future of Android on phones and tablets. He stops short of confirming that Honeycomb itself will be heading to Android phones, but says that the design decisions seen in Honeycomb are "absolutely the future of Android." This in itself is great news, and something that should have everyone excited about Android in 2011.

If you're interested in the future direction of Android, and the thought that goes into designing the platform and its UI then this interview is definitely worth a look. Check it out for yourself after the jump. [Engadget]

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Google barely got done launching Android 2.3 Gingerbread and already 2.4 is being caught on camera. Dutch tech site Tweakers got to play with an Xperia Arc and were surprised to find 2.4 listed as the software version. After some poking around on the device, they concluded that the update was likely a small update for Gingerbread in the vein of Android 2.0 and 2.1, both of which were named Eclair. The biggest feature seems to be an uncompleted Google Talk app that would allow video calling -- a feature Google is including in the tablet-centric Honeycomb. It seems they got a hand on a very early version of the OS so we likely won't hear much about 2.4 for some time. [Tweakers via Engadget]

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Near Field Communication is a feature of Android OS that arrived with Gingerbread (2.3). The practicality of NFC in our day-to-day lives is still to be questioned, but it undoubtedly represents a unique piece of technology that has enormous potential.

As more carriers and credit card companies test out NFC for daily use, it will become clear exactly how effective the technology can be. Rumor has it that PayPal could be one of the first committed partners with Google and could even start NFC payments in the second half of 2011. Laura Chambers, who is Senior Director of PayPal Mobile, said that a commercial NFC service in late 2011 is feasible and that Google could represent a viable partner. 

Such a partnership would seem like a natural fit, given the amount of transactions PayPal handles on a daily basis. It would represent a big step forward for the NFC technology that has the potential to change the way we pay for goods and services.

What do you think about the potential of NFC? Would a PayPal partnership make you more likely to try it out? [Business Week]

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If you have held on strong to your HTC Droid Eris, and not lost hope even with the lack of official updates you will rejoice to know that custom ROM developer punk.kaos has brought a sweet taste of Gingerbread to your device. KaosGingerbread, a Android 2.3 AOSP based ROM has undergone quite a few different versions, and many improvements have been made along the way, each one just continuing to get better and better. While the ROM is still not perfect, anyone who has wanted a taste of Gingerbread on their device, this is a great option for you, and remember as always, flash at your own risk. For more information, and download links be sure to check out this thread on XDA. Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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Another updated feature that comes to us with Gingerbread is the download manager.  Just like a download manager on your computer, or the one built into your computer's web browser, it's designed to help you keep track of things you come across on the web that are worth downloading and saving.  For many of us, downloaded files -- whether they be installable apps, pictures (like our pal Lloyd), or other documents -- can build up, and having one centralized place to view them all, sorted by history or size, is quite the valuable tool.  You can see a short video after the break that shows the download manager in action.

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On any phone without a physical set of keys, the on-screen keyboard is one of the most important parts of the operating system.  Android has a leg-up over other platforms here, as third-party replacement keyboards (like the crowd favorite Swype) are easy to install, and many of them are excellent in their own right.

That doesn't mean the keyboard that comes with the operating system should be a slouch, though.  With Gingerbread (Android 2.3 for those keeping score at home), Google has really outdone itself.  The new multitouch keyboard is easy to use, offers most everything we've been asking for, and is a huge improvement over the previous versions.

You don't have to wait for your phone to get it's Gingerbread upgrade to try it out, either.  XDA member hotaru has worked a little magic and you can load up the Gingerbread keyboard on most any device running Android 2.1 or higher -- check that out right here, and check out the video of it in action after the break.

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Samsung's Nexus S is now available to purchase from the Carphone Warehouse. Customers considering the "Pure Google" experience can get one for £429 sans contract and free with a variety of contracts to choose from (lowest being £30/month).

The phone can now be bought through Best Buy or Carphone Warehouse if you're considering picking one up. [Carphone Warehouse]

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Another new feature to Gingerbread is Near Field Communications (NFC).  It's a fancy term for wireless communication between things that touch each other.  You've probably seen this with your current credit or bank card, and special terminals at places like gas stations or bank teller machines, and it can be pretty handy.  It's a smartphone technology that's still in its infancy, has little practical use currently, and needs specialized hardware -- currently only the Nexus S supports it.

We expect all that to change soon, and a new series of possibilities -- and security concerns -- will become the norm in the smartphone arena.  For now, unless you're in Portland and visit one of the businesses Google targeted in their Hotpot testing area, there isn't much you can do with it.  But for kicks, get out your bank card or passport and hit the break to see a demo.

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Gingerbread on the Droid Incredible? Don't sound so surprised. Now that the source code has been made publicly available, everyone and their mother (hi, Mom!) is compiling a beta build for their favorite device.

For the most part, though, remember that these builds aren't really ready to be your daily driver -- though they're definitely getting better day by day.

That brings us back to the DInc, and this ROM from r2DoesInc. You'll get the basic Gingerbread experience, with a few tweaks. The camera's working, though GPS and video recording aren't. Be sure to check out the full changelog and instructions at the source link for the full rundown. It's a hodgepodge, to be sure, but an impressive one.

Video's after the break as well. [XDA-Developers]

Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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OMG! The Nexus One will get its over-the-air Gingerbread update in a few weeks, according to the GoogleNexus Twitter account. In a few weeks?!?!? That means we should repeatedly hit the software update button starting now, right? RIGHT?!?!

We know, we know. Patience is not your strong suit. But an interesting thing happened as the Android 2.3 code was released last week: Google said the AOSP code can't just be compiled and slapped into a working build for the Nexus One and the Nexus S. Of course, that didn't stop anybody, and we've had builds running since last Friday night -- and some of them are getting pretty darn good. But let's give the boys and girls at Google a little time to get things right (and, perhaps, enjoy their holidays?) before pushing anymore code, m'kay? [Twitter]

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One of the big changes in Gingerbread is the inclusion of a full Internet calling stack in the Android operating system.  This means that you can make and receive voice calls over 3G (or 4G or any random number of G's) and, more important, WiFi.  It works a lot like Skype or Gtalk does on your computer, and we wouldn't be surprised if it gets built into the Android Gtalk client one day.

Until then, you need a third party VoIP (Voice over IP) account, and a little setup.  Even without a clear and concise set of instructions from Google, we figured it out using the free service from sipgate after a bit of trial and error and tried to make it easy for you.  Hit the forums for the How-To.  There's a video of the new feature in action, find it after the break.

Having fun finding new and improved goodies in Gingerbread on your Nexus S or a custom ROM on your favorite device?  Let us know any thing new, improved, or just plain cool that you find!

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Whenever a new version of Android is released, one thing you can always count on is the developer community hacking it onto as many devices as they can.  Using the kernel and system image from the Nexus S, developer supercurio of XDA Developers was able to get a (mildly) working build of Gingerbread up and running on his Samsung Galaxy S

Although it's a rather crippled build -- and it'll cost you GPS, Wi-Fi, voice, and camera functionality -- it's definitely a step in the right direction.  Every good custom ROM starts with a buggy, near useless build -- these things don't happen overnight.

Check out a video of the Galaxy S running Gingerbread after the break.

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Now that the Android 2.3 code has been made available as part of the Android Open Source Project, we knew it would just be a matter of time before we get it on devices other than the Nexus S. First up is the Nexus One, thanks to developer extraordinaire Chris Soyars. He's packaged it up flashable .zip file. But note that it's missing all of the Google apps, and this is not an official build from Google or anything. But you know us. We just had to flash it. We've got full instructions in the forums. Check it out! [Android 2.3 on the Nexus One]

Update: We hear a few people have gotten Google Apps to load up, but this is still far from ready for prime time. Video's after the break.

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For your folks who like to compile and run your own ROMs straight from the source (and who doesn't?), know that the Android 2.3 Gingerbread source code is being pushed to the Android Open Source Project right ... about ... now!

For 90 percent of us or so, this doesn't mean much. But for you developer types, it means you can download the base code straight from Google.

Interestingly enough, however, is a warning against using the AOSP code to roll a version for the Nexus S. Says Google's Jean-Baptiste Queru:

"Even though Nexus S is designed to be suitable for AOSP work, there
are some caveats. I very strongly recommend against trying to use
Nexus S for anything related to AOSP at the moment. Trying to unlock
or use your Nexus S for AOSP work could easily turn it into a Nexus B
(where B means "brick"); I have two of those, they're not very useful.
I'll send some guidelines about what is currently possible once I've
finished pushing the source code. "

Again, not something most of us have to worry about. But all this does mean your favorite ROM developer likely will be incorporating Gingerbread fairly soon. [Google via @romainguy]

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