Gingerbread - Android 2.3 - Featured Articles

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Motorola XPRT update brings Gingerbread and bugfixes

The Motorola XPRT, that BlackBerry-like keyboard phone on Sprint, has finally made its move to Android 2.3 Gingerbread. Along with bumping up to the next platform version, the update brings a decent grouping of bug fixes for the device: Email User Interface fixes. Contact User Interface...
Aston Martin Aspire

Aston Martin gets in on the luxury smartphone act, high on price, low on specs

Not content with producing some of the the worlds most beautiful cars, Aston Martin has decided to get in on the luxury smartphone space with this. Known as the Aspire, the device packs Android 2.3.5, an 800MHz processor, a paultry 256MB of RAM and a 3.2 inch HVGA display. Right. Choice of colors...
Android Central

Carphone Warehouse offers Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 and Galaxy Y phone for £15.50 p.m.

UK retailer the Carphone Warehouse is kicking off its latest “Smart Deal” by giving customers the chance to pick up an entry-level Android phone and an entry-level tablet for a mere £15.50 per month. The deal runs from today until next Thursday, Aug. 23, and if you take up the £15.50 per month...

Gingerbread - Android 2.3 - Top Articles

HTC Evo 4G

Apps crashed most on Gingerbread, but Android is consistently more stable than iOS according to report

Samsung Galaxy S4 was most stable device, while the iPad 2 was the least stable It's probably no surprise, but Android 2.3 Gingerbread was the least stable version of Android when it comes to causing app crashes. That's all improved since, however — according to a report from Crittercism, which...
BBM

BBM for Android now compatible with Gingerbread

Thank you so much blackberry team. I was waiting this app. Its really great user friendly and smooth. Via: CrackBerry
BBM Gingerbread

BlackBerry to bake version of BBM for Gingerbread phones

Update will bring support for older devices While the folks behind the BBM Twitter account may be making some questionable posts, the team behind the scenes has been hard at work adding support for Gingerbread users. Jeff Gadway of BlackBerry has posted that over the past few months the team has...

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A post on Samsung Mobile Romania's Facebook page seems to suggest that Romanian Galaxy S phones (and presumably other European models) may see an official update to Android 2.3 Gingerbread by the end of March.

Translated into English and cleaned up a little, the post reads:

"The update to version 2.2.1 for Galaxy S will be available until 20 March, and Gingerbread (2.3) until the end of the month."

Our Romanian is a little rusty, but we think it's safe to assume the last part of that statement means either "it'll arrive by the end of the month", or "it won't arrive until the end of the month". Either way, it looks like the European Galaxy S could soon claim bragging rights as the first non-Nexus phone to get an official Gingerbread update. HTC has announced that Gingerbread will be coming to some of its older phones, but these updates aren't due until sometime in the second quarter.

Samsung Romania also adds that two of its budget phones, the i5500 Galaxy 5 and i5800 Galaxy 3, will be updated to Froyo by Mar. 20 and Mar. 31 respectively. [Samsung Romania Facebook via Crave]

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Our pals over at PreCentral have found themselves in possession of what apparently is a release schedule from "a major U.S. retailer," and it's got a number of Android tablets listed, including a few new ones. Let's break it down:

  • March 17: Motorola 10-inch tablet, $649, first 10-inch tablet with Android Honeycomb. Obviously, the Motorola Xoom.
  • End of March: Dell 7-inch, $449, March launch with Android 2.2 Froyo. OK, it's the Dell Streak 7.
  • End of March: Samsung 7-inch, $499, March launch with Android 2.2 Froyo. Sounds like the Galaxy Tab to us.
  • April: Acer 7-inch, $399, first 7-inch tablet with Android 2.3 Gingerbread. Acer 7-inch tablet. Check.
  • And a whole bunch of tablets in June, including a 10-inch device from HTC (that's new, price to be determined), that new 10-incher from Dell ($499), a 10-incher from Acer ($449, been announced already), and the 10-inch tablet from Toshiba that we saw at CES (priced here at $499).

The big question -- after we again say "A 10-inch tablet from HTC!" -- is which "major retailer" we're talking about. If this all pans out, CTIA could indeed be busy here in a couple weeks. [PreCentral]

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Well, that didn't take long. Just half a day or so since Adobe announced that Flash Player 10.2 would drop for Android on March 18, and the darn thing's already leaked out. This is the version that the Motorola Xoom has been waiting for, of course. So we fired it up on a Xoom, and -- behold, Flash! It's also running decently on our CyanogenMod 7 device (that's Gingerbread for you teetotallers), and our man Alex has it on his Froyo'd HTC Desire. That's not to say there's not some stuttering, still, but who's to say if this is a final build -- or if it's early and busted. If you're the adventurous type, give it a shot. [via My Droid WorldThanks, Sean!

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Adobe this morning released more details regarding the upcoming release of Flash Player 10.2. First and foremost, it'll be available in the Android Market on March 18. A number of smartphones running Android 2.2 (Froyo) and Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) meet the hardware requirements. (See Adobe's official list here.) Android tablets running Honeycomb will technically be running Flash Player 10.2 as a beta.

The big points you need to know:

  • Deeper integration with the Android browser rendering engine
  • Enhanced performance for the latest smartphones and tablets
  • Automatic soft keyboard support

If you've got a Motorola Xoom (currently the only Honeycomb tablet available), you'll need the update to Android 3.0.1 that's currently pushing out. Hit up the source links for complete info. [Adobe, Motorola]

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Development team VillainROM has released a new Gingerbread-based custom ROM for "HTC Vision" devices -- that's the T-Mobile G2 in the U.S. and the HTC Desire Z pretty much everywhere else. SenseGinger 1.0 is based on the recently-leaked Wildfire S ROM, meaning that in addition to Android 2.3.2 it also sports the new version 2.1 of HTC's Sense UI. As far as we can tell, this is the first custom ROM to appear based on the new Sense 2.1.

It's also a 1.0 release, and there's a list of known issues that you should be aware of before flashing, so if you're expecting a polished ROM with full functionality then this might not be for you. However, if you're a G2 owner with bad case of Sense (and Gingerbread) envy, or a Desire Z user who can't wait until summer for the official update, then you may want to take a closer look. [VillainROM]

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HTC's Desire S is still over a month away from release, but a leaked test ROM from the upcoming phone has already made its way online, courtesy of MoDaCo's Paul O'Brien. The ROM joins a growing list of leaked Gingerbread-based ROMs from HTC, including a test build from the Wildfire S and leaked Gingerbread update for the Desire HD.

ROM chefs over on XDA are already hard at work porting this leaked firmware over to the original Desire, just as they've previously done with Sense 2.0-powered ROMs from the Desire HD and Desire Z.

The Desire S will launch in Europe next month. Official Gingerbread updates for the Desire, Desire HD, Desire Z and Incredible S are expected shortly thereafter. [MoDaCo via XDA]

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Ever wonder how big the CyanogenMod world is? Let's break it down: CyanogenMod 7 RC2 (that's the second release candidate of the Gingerbread track of CM) went live last night. And in less than 24 hours, it's been downloaded more than 150,000 times. That's certainly nothing to sneeze at.

So if you're wondering what all the fuss is about, we suggest you dive into the Android Central Forums and ask your friends. Then root that black slab sitting in your pocket, CM it up and enjoy. [CyanogenMod]

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For all you crazy kids out there who like to do that rooting and ROMing thing, listen up -- CyanogenMod 7 RC2 has been released. If you're rocking a Sprint EVO, that means proper Wimax access. notification profiles (huzzah!), Android 2.3.3 and a host of other treats. Snag it in ROM Manager, or from CM's site. [CyanogenMod] Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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If you are still holding strong with your Motorola Droid, you will be pleased to know that our friend Peter Alfonso is as well, and he has not stopped on development. Recently Google pushed the Gingerbread 2.3.3 source to the AOSP, and while it took a little while, he jumped right into it, making an even better then last time port for the OG Droid users. Along with the ROM is a custom compiled 600MHz kernel which is said to eliminate the lag that was seen in the last ROM. If you have been waiting for an update, this is definitely one you will want to check out. For more information and links, be sure to head to Pete's site. [PeterAlfonso.com]

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The Samsung Captivate just got its official Android 2.2 Froyo update. So it's only fitting that the CyanogenMod community project just released an initial CM7 Gingebread build. That's right, Android 2.3.3 for the Samsung Captivate. It's being billed as a usable test release, but undoubtedly bugs will crop up. Give it a whirl if you want -- you'll be glad you did. [via XDA]

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LG has announced that the Optimus 2X -- the world's first (but no longer only) dual-core Android smartphone -- will be hitting Europe in March. Neither carriers nor countries were announced, and no exact date was given. The phone launched in Korea in late January and will be known as the Optimus Speed in Germany. No U.S. availability has been announced.

The Optimus 2X currently runs Android 2.2 Froyo but is upgradeable to Android 2.3 Gingerbread, LG says. You can check out our hands-on with the LG Optimus 2X here. Full presser is after the break.

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Changes in the Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread source will allow applications to take screenshots without rooting your phone.  We've always been able to take screenshots using the SDK and the ddms utility (which you can see above), and some third-party manufacturer skins have enabled it -- both accidentally and on purpose. But with Android 2.3.3 it appears that applications will be able to do it without rooting on stock Android.  This is because of some changes in the way the SurfaceFlinger service handles what it captures from the framebuffer.  For more info, have a look here.  It's something that many users have been requesting, and security issues aside, something long available on most other smartphone platforms. (Wave to your screenshot-less Windows Phone friends, everybody!)

Of course we have to wait for 2.3.3 to filter down to everyone before we see apps take advantage of this for most phones.  But if you've rooted and are already rocking Gingerbread, it shouldn't be long before your favorite developer integrates this and any other small tweaks that come with the latest version.  Then again, you can use any of the methods on the Market to capture your screen if you're already rooted.  So goes Android's circle of life, I guess.  Hopefully, manufacturers get 2.3.3 pushed out soon and we all can enjoy. 

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Gingerbread (the Android 2.3.2 version) has been leaked for the Samsung Galaxy S i9000.  Users at XDA Developers are saying that it includes Touchwiz 4, and download mode is still available.  It also looks like Samsung is now using the ext4 file system, which should bring performance boosts much like the ones on the Nexus S.

Remember, this is a beta build -- at best.  I wouldn't recommend anyone run and flash it, but in the hands of developers it's like 24 karat gold -- possibly leading to things like CyanogenMod 7 for Samsung Galaxy S phones.  What this means for US customers who are tied to a carrier for upgrades is unknown, but at least Samsung has Gingerbread in the works.  Check the source link for download locations.  [XDA-Developers] Thanks everyone who sent this in!

Update: Supercurio, of Voodoo fame, has had a look and verifies that this does not enable the ext4 file system.  His word is good as gold when it comes to the Galaxy S -- blame excited users and bloggers for the mix-up.

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HTC has confirmed that Gingerbread will be making its way to the Desire, Desire HD and Desire Z during the second quarter of the year, according to reports from SlashGear, which sources an HTC spokesperson. HTC also re-confirmed the Incredible S Gingerbread update, though this has been known since the phone was announced.

This is the first confirmation of a Gingerbread update for the Desire HD and Desire Z -- good news for owners of those phones, which are still under six months old.  Reports started to surface last week suggesting a Gingerbread update for the original Desire, which is now approaching its first birthday.

The Q2 2011 release window for these Gingerbread updates will coincide with the launch of HTC's new Desire S and Wildfire S, both of which run Gingerbread out of the box. [SlashGear]

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Every now and then updates come with interesting little surprises. Sometimes good, sometimes not. And in the case of the Android 2.3.3 update to the Nexus S, it appears to be the latter.

Users in the Android Central Forums and Google Mobile Forum are noticing that their Nexus S screens appearing to be discolored. Colors seemed to be washed out or even yellowed at some screens. Even after playing with some brightness settings, Nexus S owners are still experiencing the same visual issues. And we've seen it on our own Nexi, too. Have you guys been noticing the same color issues? If so, let us know in the comments or forums. [Android Central Forums and Google Mobile Forum]

Update: Kinda blurry video of said yellow tint is after the break.

Update 2: Ry Guy's answered on the Google forums, and the change indeed was intentional. Here 'tis:

With your new OTA complete, you may notice a slight difference in the way colors are displayed on your Nexus S. For Nexus S, we have adjusted the color temperature settings to more accurately reflect darker colors at all brightness levels. The Gingerbread UI being darker, we found that the colors were not as accurate when the device was being used at lower brightness levels. For example, some users reported that the initial color temperature was too high leading to some darker greys having a reddish tone; with the new color temperature this is no longer the case.

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Yes, you read that right -- The Samsung Vibrant now has its very own CyanogenMod 7 (official) test release.  It's clearly labeled as a TEST RELEASE, so don't expect miracles just yet, but finding and fighting bugs is half the fun of fooling with custom ROMs for many of us anyway.  You can find all the details and download information at the source link.

Let's be serious here for a minute.  You're probably never going to see an official Gingerbread build for the Vibrant from Samsung.  Yes, I think I was wrong.  That hardly ever happens.  CyanogenMod 7 looks to be the best, and logical choice for the Vibrant at this time, and it's something to at least keep an eye on.  If you do decide to take the plunge, you'll find help and support in the Vibrant forums here at Android Central.  [CyanogenMod forum] Thanks everyone who sent this in!

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Whenever we talk updating our phones, we inevitably talk about "manual updates." And that leads to the inevitable questions, "Is it safe?" and "How do I do it?"

Manual updates are just like over-the-air (OTA) updates. Only difference is that instead of letting your phone download the update from a server somewhere, you download it yourself, move save it to you phone's SD card and then manually start the update process. In an OTA update, the phone does all this for you. But the big difference is that there's no waiting with manual updates.

In the video above -- edited for time purposes -- we walk you through manually updating the Nexus One to Android 2.3.3 Gingerbead. And note that this is for a stock phone -- unrooted, stock recovery, the whole nine yards.

The general process is similar for most phones, though you'll want to follow the instructions for your specific device. And as always, if you have more questions, hit us up in the Android Central Forums.

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The Android 2.3.3 (GRI40 for those keeping score at home) OTA update for the Samsung Nexus S has started to roll out, but there's no need to wait -- it's a breeze to manually install.  Think of it as the OTA update, with less of the A.  What you need to do:

  • Grab the OTA package here [ link via XDA]
  • Rename it to update.zip.  This isn't needed for the Nexus S bootloader, but it makes things easy.
  • Copy it over to the internal storage on your Nexus S.
  • Power off, then hold volume up and power to reboot to the bootloader.
  • Using the volume key to navigate, select recovery, then use the power button to confirm
  • When you see the warning triangle and arrow, hold the power button and tap volume up.  You'll see a menu.
  • From the menu, select "apply update from /sdcard", and choose update.zip from the list.
  • Let it do its thing and update your system, radio, and other partitions.  When finished, choose "reboot system now"
  • Enjoy!

Sound off in the comments how things are going for you.

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The Nexus One's over-the-air update to Android 2.3.3 Gingerbread (erm, not Android 2.4) is starting to push out. But if you can't wait (that'd be us), you can manually install the update. It's the same thing as the OTA update, just, not OTA. Here's how to install:

  1. Download the update from here. [link via XDA]
  2. Rename the file to update.zip. Note that if you're using Windows, just rename it to "update" (no quotes, of course) because it's already a zipped file.
  3. Copy the update.zip file onto your microSD card.
  4. With your Nexus One off, hold down the trackball and press the power button.
  5. You'll be booted into a white screen with three Android robots on skateboards. Select "Bootloader."
  6. On the next screen, select "Recovery."
  7. Your phone will reboot, giving you a picture of the Android robot and an exclamation point inside a triangle.
  8. Now press the power button and volume up button at the same time. It could take a couple of tries.
  9. Now (using the trackball this time) choose "Apply sdcard:update.zip" and let things run their course.

Easy peasy! Enjoy!

Update:  Seeing getprop/status 7 errors?  You'll need to update your version of Hboot.  If you're not familiar with fastboot and flashing, have a look here for the long (but easy) way.

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A minor update to Android's Gmail app has hit the Market that fixes custom labels and improves copy/paste in Gingerbread. If you have custom labels in Gmail with custom colors, they wouldn't properly sync. With this update, that should be fixed. Also updated is the ability to long-press to copy text with Android 2.3 (Gingerbread). 

Here is the full update log:

  • Enable long press to copy text on Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) devices
  • Sync custom label colors
  • Bug fixes

The Market link for the Gmail app is available after the break. 

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