Headlines

3 years ago

HTC One V sighted in black and purple

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If you're considering HTC's new entry-level phone, the One V, but weren't blown away by the charcoal-colored version on show at MWC, maybe the black and purple flavors will be to your liking. Two new renders of the HTC One V have emerged on Japanese site Blog of Mobile, showing the ICS-powered 3.7-incher in the two new colors you see above.

Of all three new HTC devices, there's no question that we've seen the least of the One V. No-one's seen a working handset just yet, and the demo units we saw at MWC couldn't be powered on. However, we're big fans of the iconic design first introduced by the Legend back in 2010, and we're curious to see how this thing looks after it's been dunked in.... whatever you dunk a slab of aluminum in to make it look like that.

Source: Blog of Mobile; via: UnwiredView

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3 years ago

Samsung Galaxy Note in white on 1SaleADay for $579

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It's not very often that I'll use the word "deal" when something costs $579, but the Samsung Galaxy Note is an exception. If you've been looking for one, and prefer an unlocked world version over the AT&T version, now is you chance to save a bit of cash and pick it up in white. 

Source: 1SaleADay. Thanks, Robert!

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3 years ago

HTC EVO 3D hboot rollback method found, but not for the timid

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As many an EVO 3D user will tell you, the 1.5 hboot that came with the latest update has been a bit of a thorn in the side of Android hackers. That may soon be coming to an end, and users at XDA -Developers have found a method to roll back to an earlier version that is a bit more development friendly. But everything isn't rosy just yet.

The current method is pretty tricky on paper. You need to use Linux, and there's lots of critical timing and other things to go wrong. There's also a question about the data connection afterwards to keep you from diving in feet-first. Give the folks working on this one a bit more time and they'll likely have a handle on things -- that's what they do. We just wanted to share the news for those who've been waiting. Hit the source link for all the gory details.

Source: XDA-Developers. Thanks, Cody!

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3 years ago

Manage location data in the pictures you take [privacy and security]

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Here's a security and privacy tip that many of us forget about, yet is really easy to manage -- geo-location data in the pictures you take with your Android phone. Modern digital cameras that have a way to capture GPS data (that means your Android phone or tablet) can attach location data to pictures using the Exif (Exchangeable image file format) standard. The Exif standard attaches metadata tags to pictures, sounds, and video to keep track of things like song titles, video length, and camera model. It also has a slot for latitude and longitude coordinates from your GPS receiver. 

Attaching GPS metadata to the pictures you take can be handy, and there are reasons people would want to do it. Having the date, time and location embedded in a picture means never forgetting where and when you took it, and you can use services like Panoramio to place your pictures on a map overlay. Having a location fixed to an image has many legitimate, and fun, uses.

But many times we don't want someone else to know the precise GPS location of a picture we've taken. "Little Timmy's first day at summer camp" would make a great picture to share on Facebook or Google+, but do we want some stranger to know where little Timmy is sleeping this week? It's a scary world out there, full of people with bad intentions. Nobody will blame you if you err on the side of caution.

It matters, because it's not just apps that can access this data. Download a picture from your (or a friends) online albums somewhere. After you have it saved, right click it (Windows) and look at all the properties. If the picture is geo-tagged, you'll get GPS coordinates within a few feet of where the camera was when it was taken. There are even programs and websites that spit out the location data of images, and not everyone who uses these can be trusted. Thankfully, turning location tagging on and off is really easy.

You'll find a spot in the settings of your camera app (stock or a custom app from the Google Play store) that will say location or geo-tag. Poke around a bit, it's in different places depending on your phone's firmware or the app you're using, but it's there. When that setting is on, your GPS will turn on and the coordinates will be saved with the image data. When it's off, neither will happen.

Take control of these sorts of settings, and keep yourself safer on the Internet. 

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3 years ago

Latest 'Galaxy S III' render looks no more genuine than the last two

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Another week, another Galaxy S III rumor. This time it's a new purported render of the still unannounced device, which has been sent to PhoneArena​ by way of an anonymous tipster. We've seen a couple of purported images of the mythical phone over the past few months, and both have turned out to be mock-ups or fabrications. On account of a few major inconsistencies in this latest image, we're gonna call foul here, too. If you take a closer look at the image, you'll see awkwardly large fonts, icons from an older version of TouchWiz and copy-pasted Galaxy Nexus notification bar and software buttons. That's before you even get to the reference to an event in Paris which Samsung has already denied has anything to do with the Galaxy S III.

Hold tight, folks -- we'll have a new flagship phone from Samsung before too long, but for the moment we're almost certain this isn't it. The official line from Sammy remains that the successor to the Galaxy S II will be revealed at an event during the first half of the year.

Source: PhoneArena

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3 years ago

LG Optimus V getting a security update, will likely block rooting

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The LG Optimus V has an update waiting for it, you might have received a text message from Virgin about it. The update offers a security fix "that will protect your handset from security vulnerabilities that may occur either through a remote attacker’s access attempt or through a 3rd party application’s ability to access code that could be used to exploit data on the handset". They even provide a link to the National Vulnerability Database on their FAQ page, making it look very official and serious.

You'll have to download the update and install it manually via your computer (see the source links for details), and you won't have a new version of Android to play with when you're done, unfortunately. But security patches are the types of updates that are truly important, so it's good to see them.

In all likelihood, these exploits being patched will kill the current root methods. Rumor has it that this is the only reason for the update, but rumors are rumors. In any case, if you're riding the root train on your Optimus V (and with the dev team we have in the forums, who could blame you?) you should probably skip this one until those same developers say differently. For everyone else, see the links for more details.

Source: Virgin Mobile USA; via Android Central forums

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3 years ago

Motorola Droid Pro soak test to begin shortly?

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A reader let us in on a message from Moto Matt about an upcoming soak test for the Motorola Droid Pro. It's the standard Motorola Feedback Network invite to participate, in case you've not seen one it looks a little like this:

Hi,

Thanks for joining the Motorola Feedback Network. We are inviting owners of the Motorola Droid Pro on Verizon to participate in an early preview of a new software release, and provide feedback. If you are not currently using a

Droid Pro, please excuse and ignore this email.

Click this link to take a short enrollment survey if you wish to take part.

Note that you must be a member in good standing of the Motorola Owners'
Forums to be included. The registration window is can close without notice so please respond as quickly as possible.

This is a confidential test under the terms of the Motorola Feedback Network. Do not post any details or information about this on any public sites.

Thanks -- please understand that start times are always fluid. We ask for your patience if you register but don't hear from us right away.

Matt

Motorola Owners’ Forums
Motorola Feedback Network

Motorola like to carefully and slowly roll things out for testing, and if all goes well everyone should have access to an update shortly after. It's a smart method, and prevents problems with OTA's like we've seen in the past.

As for the update? The Droid Pro isn't on any short list to get Ice Cream Sandwich, so we imagine it will be a maintenance release with fixes for bugs, which can be just as important. We'll post further details as we uncover them, in the meantime hit the forums to discuss!

Thanks, anon!

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3 years ago

Google Offers expands to 4 new cities, with 11 new partners

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Google has expanded their Google Offers service with 4 new cities and 11 new partners, bringing the totals to 30 deal partners in 40 cities. Users in Austin, Houston, Philadelphia, and Miami will now be able to get more daily deals via the Android app or through their inbox, and the partner sites will get even more exposure now that they have aligned themselves with the big G.

The new deal partners look to expand things with deals for just about everyone.  8Moms, APDailyDeals, AT&T Interactive, Boston.com, DailyDeals.com, DoubleTakeDeals, Half Off Depot, Morgan’s Deals, Savored, Signpost and Urban Dealight are the latest additions, and should offer a varied mix to fit just about every taste.

I know many of us are deal-watchers. I spend more time and money than I should searching them out, and no day trip to downtown DC is complete without seeing what I can save while out and about. Now we all have even more partners to look forward to in our daily emails. And that dinner at The Cajun Experience looks artery-cloggingly delicious. 

Source: Google Commerce

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3 years ago

HTC reminds us what's getting Ice Cream Sandwich and when they might get it

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HTC on its blog has reiterated which current phones are slated for an update to Android 4.0. It's not a new list -- we've seen all of these phones announced previously (here, here, here and here) -- but it's good to see it all in one place. In alphabetical order, they are:

  • DROID Incredible 2 by HTC
  • HTC Amaze 4G
  • HTC Desire S
  • HTC Desire HD
  • HTC EVO 3D
  • HTC EVO Design 4G
  • HTC Incredible S
  • HTC Sensation
  • HTC Sensation XL
  • HTC Sensation 4G
  • HTC Sensation XE
  • HTC Raider
  • HTC Rezound
  • HTC Rhyme
  • HTC Thunderbolt
  • HTC Vivid

As we've already reported, the Sensation and Sensation XE are getting their updates now. The Sensation 4G (that's T-Mobile's version) and the Sensation XL are next, though no time frame was given.

So maybe the HTC One line (that's the HTC One X above) isn't in the cards for you. Maybe you have to hold out for Ice Cream Sandwich on your current device. We hear ya. We've got phones that are languishing with Gingerbread, too.

​Source: HTC blog

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3 years ago

Sony explains Xperia Sola's 'floating touch' technology

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When Sony unveiled the Xperia Sola yesterday, it was keen to tout its new "floating touch" technology as a major selling point. Unlike other touchscreen phones, the Sola can detect when a finger is hovering over the screen, not just when it's made contact. This, potentially, could present some interesting new ways of interacting with touchscreens -- for example, the Sola's browser will allow users to hover their finger over the screen like a cursor when selecting links.

Today, Sony has gone into more detail about exactly how this "magical" new technology works, debunking our theory of millions of tiny wizards living under the screen. On the company's mobile developer blog, engineer Erik Hellman explains exactly what's involved. Essentially, the Xperia Sola contains two types of capacitive sensor. There's a mutual-capacitive sensor, used for multi-touch, and a self-capacitive sensor, which generates a stronger signal, allowing it to detect conductive objects (like your greasy paws) from further away. Self-capacitive sensors aren't multi-touch capable, and mutual-capacitive sensors aren't strong enough to detect objects at a distance, but if you combine both in a single screen, you get the best of both worlds -- multi-touch when you're touching the screen, and floating touch when you're not.

We're definitely interested to see what third-party devs can do when they get hold of this tech. In the meantime, more technical details can be had over at the source link.

Source: Sony Developer Blog

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3 years ago

Late-night poll: Do you use a security application?

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You might have noticed that we're going to talk a little extra about security and privacy this week here at Android Central. It's a discussion worth having. We've asked a few security and/or privacy related questions in polls past, things like lockscreen security (use it), app permissions, and Google's privacy policy, but we haven't hit this basic one just yet. Tonight, let's change that.

Do you use a security application?

One of any type -- a malware scanner, a remote lock and wipe tool, a "find my phone" tool, or even a net nanny app for the kids. If you use one, let us know!

 

Do you use a "security" app?

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3 years ago

HTC shows off the 'Micro Arc Oxidation' process used on the One S

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

HTC is mighty proud of the Micro Arc Oxidation process they use on the upcoming HTC One S. Based on what we've seen from hands-on time with the S, we think they have good reason. The process turns the aircraft-grade aluminum into something that looks and feels like ceramic, and gives the S a new sleek look that gets more than a few of us interested. They showed a bit of how it works during their Mobile World Congress presentation, and now they have given us a 98 second look at the process and some behind the scenes info. Have a look, the "awesome lightning striking the phone" is pretty cool to watch. We'll be able to see how nice the finish is ourselves soon enough, as the One S will be hitting the shelves in Europe and the U.S. this spring.

Source: Youtube

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3 years ago

PlayStation Store and games now available on Sony Xperia S

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For whatever reason, Sony wasn't able to finish up PlayStation support for the Xperia S before the phone hit store shelves in Europe. Today, though, that placeholder link in the Xperia S app drawer now loads a web page where the PlayStation Store and PS Pocket app can be downloaded. The same goes for the Xperia S's Japanese counterpart, the Acro HD, which launched in late February.

To get your fill of classic 32-bit titles, you'll first need to enable non-Market applications in Settings > Applications, then run "Let's start PS store" in the app tray. Next, download the two apps, which in turn will let you buy and play games. We're seeing around a dozen titles available on our review unit, though some of those are still only playable on the Xperia Play. And it should be noted that you'll need a PlayStation Network or Sony Entertainment Network account to access Sony's mobile gaming catalog.

The manufacturer plans to bring PS certification to all its 2012 phones, including the Xperia P, U, Ion and the recently-announced Xperia Sola.

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3 years ago

Radio transplant brings AT&T Galaxy Note to life on T-Mobile's '4G' HSPA+

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Since it emerged that the AT&T Galaxy Note's hardware supported T-Mobile's HSPA frequencies, there's been a cash bounty out for anyone able to bring Tmo 3G and '4G' connectivity to the device. Now it may be time for someone to collect that reward, as a method involving copying over parts of radio firmware from other devices has resulted in success.

The method, discovered by hacker 'Tomin.FHL,' requires users with rooted, SIM-unlocked AT&T Notes to download and flash specific parts of a radio file from another phone through ClockworkMod recovery. And that's pretty much it. Though obviously you'll well and truly void your warranty in the process, which means you'll be on your own if something goes wrong (like, say, bricking your phone because you flashed a hacked radio onto it).

Over on XDA​, various forum members have tried the hack with varying levels of success. The general consensus seems to be that it works, though you can expect slower HSPA data rates than you'd get on an officially-sanctioned Tmo device. If you're understand the risks, you'll find more info over at the source link.

Source: XDA; via: TechCrunch

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3 years ago

Why to use a secure lockscreen [security and privacy]

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We've talked before about how to set up your Android phone with a secure lockscreen, and today we're going to talk about why you should do it. We're all concerned about our privacy and security when it comes to our smartphones and connected devices, and the first step is to take whatever measures are available to us and put them to good use. It's not very wise to sit back and complain about the security issues if we're not willing to take any steps ourselves to keep things private. Ultimately, we as users are responsible for security and privacy on our phones. 

A rally against an application, or our carriers, for privacy concerns is all well and good. It's something we all need to concern ourselves with, and be armed with as much information as possible. But in the end, we have to make the final decisions about what we feel is secure and what isn't. A good start is to keep your private information safe in the event that you lose your phone or it gets stolen. It happens -- it's happened to me, it's likely happened to more than a few of you. You either leave your phone behind somewhere and it's gone when you go looking for it, or some unsavory type takes it upon himself to make your property disappear. A couple years back I was relieved of my laptop and briefcase containing two smartphones in a parking garage, and after the initial period of anger and shock I instantly worried about the fellow having access to my information -- not the equipment itself. Luckily, everything was password locked and I don't think any of my precious data made its way into someone else's hands. The laptop and phones were replaced, and all was well.

That scenario would have played out a good bit differently had the phones been left unprotected. Besides my personal information (which I certainly don't want anyone to have access to) I had business contacts, documents that were covered under an NDA, and other information that would have caused quite a stir if it had ended up in the wrong hands. Companies -- even and especially the one you work for -- take that sort of thing pretty damn seriously, and they should. That means you should. Whether it's some sort of trade secrets, sensitive financial data, or just information about your family, you don't want someone getting hold of it. Would you want someone horrible enough to steal your phone knowing which school your kids attend, or your Mom's address? What about your banking information, or your work email? Just because you have nothing to hide doesn't mean you shouldn't care. If you think cancelling and replacing credit cards and your drivers license is a pain when you lose your wallet, imagine what it's like trying to fix things when your Google account has been compromised. Or your PayPal account. Or even Facebook. 

Yes, it's inconvenient to have to type in a PIN or passcode every time you unlock your phone. It's also inconvenient to pay your car insurance every month. But when the time comes that you need either, you'll be glad you did.

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