Android Market

As Eric Schmidt mentioned in his keynote address at Mobile World Congress, the Android Market now has over 150,000 applications.  The number of apps has tripled over the past nine months, and grown by a full third since last fall.  They're getting better as well -- I think we all have noticed applications of a much higher quality appearing, as well as cross platform apps and games from the bigger developers.

It's a testament to Android's extremely fast growth, and we don't expect it to slow any time soon.

 

Reader comments

150,000 apps in Android Market, tripled in 9 months

24 Comments

But I've got this GREAT calculator app that makes a farting noise every time you press a button, so let me see...point-9-0 * -- hahaha...the multiplication sign is hilarious....

Does this number take into account all the garbage themes, photo-packs (usually porn), helloworld apps, test-don't-buy-this, and duplicates stolen and re-sold?

Exactly, numbers mean nothing, it's all about quality.

I'd rather have fewer apps if they're good apps rather than a ton of crapps. However I also believe alot of the sudden growth in Android Apps are quality apps now that iOS only developers realize that Android is the new place for marketing their services.

Yeah, seems most of the apps are junk, obvious malware, or not worth the money people are charging. But I guess it's one of the best we got, so we make do with what we have.

90%, 1/3...?

Try 99% of the apps are worthless. If just 1% percent were worth something, that would be 1500 apps that I might consider. I am hard pressed to name 100 a++ apps.

Google should sell cheese. They'd make a killing with all the whine flowing here.

Anyway, I'm glad to see such a massive number because it means I'm likely to find the handfull of apps and need today and highly probable the apps I need tomorrow will exist by the time I need them.

I kind of hate how cross-platform developers treat the iPhone as first-class and Android as Second-class (not saying they are doing it on purpose but they can at least put some effort into getting their apps fixed!). For example, my friend has the nba league pass app on his iphone and is fast loading, smooth animations, and good quality for watching the game on his phone. while on my phone (Epic 4g), the animations were choppy, loading took forever, and the quality was horrible.

I kind of hate how cross-platform developers treat the iPhone as first-class and Android as Second-class (not saying they are doing it on purpose but they can at least put some effort into getting their apps fixed!). For example, my friend has the nba league pass app on his iphone and is fast loading, smooth animations, and good quality for watching the game on his phone. while on my phone (Epic 4g), the animations were choppy, loading took forever, and the quality was horrible.

I kind of hate how cross-platform developers treat the iPhone as first-class and Android as Second-class (not saying they are doing it on purpose but they can at least put some effort into getting their apps fixed!). For example, my friend has the nba league pass app on his iphone and is fast loading, smooth animations, and good quality for watching the game on his phone. while on my phone (Epic 4g), the animations were choppy, loading took forever, and the quality was horrible.

@ Officerpolabear

Its almost worth posting three times... since nobody but the companies making hardware seem to realize the revolution at hand in smartphones. I know its kind of a pain to filter through the apps to get to the ones that will make your phone more enjoyable but consider a few of the following:

1. 90% of apps are free so who cares if they suck?
2. Being an open source platform with little interference from wireless carriers Android beats Apple and their apps hands down.
3. Because of Android I can leave my netbook at home and not feel guilty. Or bring it along and have free broadband off of my phone.

This operating system and the associated apps store is still in its infancy. With the development and deployment of Android 3.0 for tablets and with new dual core processors, now more than ever there is the capability and monetary incentive by large software companies to capitalize on the needs of hundreds of thousands of Android users that are more than willing to pay for quality apps to get things done and have more rich mobile media experiences. I am going to continue to support Google and all the app developers pouring their time and money into this platform. And a note to all that complain about apps... if they suck or have a bug then send an email to the developers so they can fix the problem, otherwise without feedback the apps will continue to suck(of the free variety that is).