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2 weeks ago

Fess up: Who's buying an iPhone 7 today?

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iPhone launch day yay magical give us your money sheeple

Spend a night in the rain to buy a smaller version of the phone you actually wanted.

For Android people, today is Friday — a good day, to be sure. Elsewhere though, it's iPhone launch day, a magical, revolutionary time that (usually) comes just once a year. It's the time of year when people camp outside a glowing retail cuboid only to be told the phone they actually want is out of stock. That's right: today is the first day actual humans, as opposed to weirdo tech bloggers, can get their hands on the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.

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2 weeks ago

Best AT&T phones

What are the best phones you can buy at AT&T right now?

Whether you're a loyal AT&T subscriber, or you're looking to jump ship to its giant cellular network, take a peek at our list of the best smartphones the carrier has to offer.

We'll be updating this guide throughout the year to keep you informed of the latest devices worth wielding as your daily driver. Be sure to read through our reviews for the full rundown on each smartphone.

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2 weeks ago

Grab an unlocked HTC One A9 and 15000mAh power bank for just $360

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Newegg is currently offering the unlocked HTC One A9 in topaz gold for just $360, and to sweeten the deal you can also score a free 15000mAh power bank with your purchase. The HTC One A9 has 32GB of internal storage and 3GB of RAM under the 5-inch display. HTC has already stated the One A9 will be receiving an update to Android Nougat in the future, which makes this an even better deal.

If the $140 savings on the phone isn't enough, the free 15000mAh power bank sweetens it even further. This will help you keep it charged while on the go, ensuring you don't run out of power. This deal is only available for a limited time, so be sure to act quick if you are interested.

See at Newegg

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2 weeks ago

'Safe' Galaxy Note 7s may use a different battery icon

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Galaxy Note 7 power consumption

New Galaxy Note 7s will reportedly use a green battery icon, not white — but will it make any real difference?

As Samsung prepares to replace potentially explosive Galaxy Note 7 phones with new versions, it seems the company is considering new ways help Note owners know whether their device is safe or not. Now it appears a visual change to the phone's software may reassure Note 7 owners (and possibly airlines, aviation authorities and others) that their phones are safe.

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2 weeks ago

OnePlus 3 vs. Honor 8: When $399 is a bargain

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Which is better: the OnePlus 3, or the Honor 8?

I can't tell the last time we've been asked by so many people for one specific comparison. This is the hype machine at work, with two phones that aesthetically couldn't be more different artificially paired by the most important consideration of all, price.

The two phones I am talking about are, of course, the OnePlus 3 and the Honor 8, both priced at $399 and offering well-rounded spec sheets that jump off the page in one more than one area. But which one is better depends on what you value in a smartphone, and how amenable you are to a software that errs on the side of eccentric (in this case the Honor 8, but potentially soon the OnePlus 3, too).

(There's another phone that should be in this comparisons, the ZTE Axon 7, a pretty great $399 phone that does most everything well. Suffice it to say, we'll be including it in future roundups, but the high-profile nature of the OnePlus 3 and Honor 8 necessitate a head-to-head.)

Hardware

These two phones couldn't be more different unless one was made of, say, maple syrup. Fine, I won't go that far but for the same price you're getting a drastically different chassis and, for the most part, internal makeup.

Let's start with the more traditional of the two, the OnePlus 3. Eschewing the metal-and-sandpaper combination of its predecessor, the OnePlus 3 is a beautifully-crafted all-metal phone with soft angles, visible antenna lines, and a small camera bump. I would say it looks like an iPhone except that an iPhone looks like every other phone these days, so let's split the difference and say though in losing some of its distinctiveness the OnePlus 3 appears mature and confident its averageness.

The OnePlus 3 is a big phone, though: at 5.5-inches, with a hefty bottom bezel to house the front fingerprint sensor, it's not a one hand-friendly phone for many. And while its 1080p display has been criticized, I'm a fan: it's sharp and saturated, with lovely colors, ample (albeit less than remarkable) brightness and endless viewing angles. Below the phone lives a single speaker, a headphone port, and a USB-C port. What's remarkable about the OnePlus 3 is how unremarkable it is, and how much value you get for the price.

The Honor 8 approaches that value-conscious narrative from a very different place. All diminutive form factor and reflective glass, the phone is derived from the more-expensive, and arguably less interesting, Huawei P9. The 5.2-inch 1080p display may be slightly sharper than the OnePlus 3's, but they are comparable in most other respects; it is vivid and responsive, with excellent viewing angles and good-not-great maximum brightness.

I find it fascinating that both phones get to a similar place from such divergent designs.

In my hands, despite the slippery and fingerprint-soaking nature of its rear glass, the Honor 8 gets my pick, mainly for its size. The bottom ports are mirror images of the OnePlus 3's, with the same etched mono speaker grill, USB-C and headphone port. And while the larger phone boasts a mute toggle on its left side above the volume keys — another similarity to the iPhone — the Honor 8 looks like nothing I've ever used, especially from the back. With dual cameras (more on that later, obviously), and a rear fingerprint sensor that doubles as a button, this thing has gimmick written all over it.

And yet there is nothing gimmicky about either of those features (well, nothing much). Let's start with the rear fingerprint sensor: it's very fast, one of the fastest I've used, and combined with some of EMUI's gestures and button combinations, it's a joy to use. Seriously, it's an honor to use the Honor 8's fing... OK, I'll show myself out.

Above it, the dual 12MP rear camera sensors are intriguing to look at, but work very simply: one takes a photo in color, and the other in monochrome. Though it's possible to do all kinds of depth-related tricks in Huawei's convoluted camera app, left on Auto the two sensors combine to take just great daytime photos. But so does the OnePlus 3's 16MP shooter. Neither are wonderful at night, and don't compare well to the kings of low-light, the Galaxy S7 and Note 7, but that's to be expected from phones nearly half the cost.

It may be trite to say, but I find it fascinating that both phones get to a similar place from such divergent designs. The Honor 8 is slippery to a fault, but otherwise incredibly comfortable and perfect for one-handed use. The OnePlus 3 is a known quantity if you've used a big phone over the past couple of years. But I couldn't tell you which is the better phone just from holding and eyeing them; each will attract a particular type of user and you'll know who you are right away.

Internally, things are a bit different. The OnePlus 3, with its Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 chip, is more powerful than the Honor 8, which boasts a Kirin 950. All things being equal, the differences between the two chips, at least from a CPU perspective, are slight. Where the two really differ is in the speed of their graphics processors, with the Adreno 530 in the OnePlus 3 coming out way ahead. In real-world comparisons the differences are small, but you should know that going in to the purchase that the long-term prospects for the Snapdragon are slightly more auspicious than the Kirin 950, which isn't even the fastest variant in Hisilicon's current lineup.

Both phones, however, have ample amounts of RAM, the Honor 8 4GB and the OP3 6GB, and provide a fluid experience. Short of comparing benchmarking (which I did, and the OnePlus 3 came out ahead by a small margin in every instance) I found little between them, even though the OnePlus 3 has what appears to be a software layer with considerably less overhead than Huawei's divisive EMUI 4.1.

With dual cameras and a rear fingerprint sensor that doubles as a button, the Honor 8 has gimmick written all over it — but they're not gimmicks at all.

The OnePlus 3 does have double the storage — 64GB to 32GB in the Honor 8 — though it lacks a microSD slot for expandable storage. But in lieu of expandable storage, it has an extra slot for a second SIM card, which is increasingly useful to many travelers, both in the East and West. Honor offers a dual-SIM variant in Europe, but forgoes that option in the U.S., where such a configuration is uncommon.

Software

Here's where the two phones diverge: Honor's EMUI 4.1 layer, though based on Android 6.0, is not great. It's good in places, sure, but there are areas, like the notification shade and app drawer-lacking launcher, that feel, to a Canadian used to doing things a certain way, change for change's sake.

The OnePlus 3, on the other hand, looks remarkably like a Nexus device from a software perspective. But there are small hints, from the optional Shelf that stands in for Google Now in the launcher, to support for app-launching gestures, that remind you this is made by a company influenced as much by Xiaomi as by Google.

My biggest issue with the Honor 8's software is the unabashed disturbing of the sacred notification shade.

Let's be clear: there are some great ideas in the Honor 8's software. In particular, I like the way Huawei makes full use of the rear fingerprint sensor-button combo to do things like quickly launch apps, run shortcuts, or (my personal favorite) lower the notification shade. Every phone with a rear fingerprint sensor should do this (looking at you, LG). And I'm not outright dismissing the no-app-drawer launcher idea, either: to some extent the app drawer is an anachronism, a throwback to a much earlier time in the Android world. But this only works as long as you keep things organized.

My biggest issue with the Honor 8's software is the blatant — there's no right way to say this — fuckery of the notification area. Persistent notifications, such as a Google Maps direction banner, are egregiously squashed and basically unusable. Other apps push notifications as banners that overlay in ugly, disruptive ways over the active app. It's all just bad, and wrong.

The good news is that it seems like Huawei is slowly learning, since good guy Alex Dobie tells me things used to be a lot worse in the Huawei space. Being the first EMUI-based device I've ever used, I will take him at his word and be thankful I didn't have to suffer through that super awkward phase. Even better, EMUI 5.0, based on Nougat, is reportedly much better, and has reverted the notification shade to something more along the lines of what Google intended for Nougat. We shall see.

The flip side is that though OxygenOS 3 has grown into a pretty powerful, stock-plus-useful-features build of Android Marshmallow, there are bad tidings that suggest, due to internal unrest, the company's software is now being overseen by the team in charge of the much less Western market-friendly HydrogenOS. OnePlus assured me that things won't change for the worse, and any changes to OxygenOS going forward will be measured, but I'm not so sure.

Either way, I'd give the overall edge to OnePlus here, even if its gesture support isn't quite as good.

Camera

The funny thing about the cameras on both of these devices is that, like their designs, on paper they couldn't be more different, and yet their output is remarkably similar.

As I said earlier, the Honor 8 sports two 12-megapixel sensors, one color and one monochrome. You don't have to toggle anything to take advantage of the second sensor's optics, and it's certainly true that it confers an ample amount of additional detail to daylight photos. I was really impressed with the photos I took on the Honor 8, and that's not even getting into the myriad modes, options and toggles in Huawei's mostly good camera app. Yes, there's an excellent manual mode, too.

The OnePlus 3 takes great photos, too, in most situations. It has the advantage of boasting optical image stabilization, which the Honor 8 lacks, so low-light photos are slightly better (though still not great). In fact, I found that the OnePlus 3 takes better indoor photos as well, since its OIS is able to keep the sensor more stable at lower shutter speeds, preventing the blur that, in the same scene, crept into the Honor 8.

OnePlus 3 (left) / Honor 8 (right) — click image to view larger

In daylight, the Honor tends to shoot a little bit warmer and deals with areas of high contrast a little better, but there isn't a huge difference between them. And while the number of features in the Honor 8's camera eclipses that of the OnePlus 3, the latter's is much easier to master. At night, the OnePlus 3 uses its OIS to great effect, eking much sharper photos than the Honor 8. It also ramps up the ISO, which offers a vividness that, for some reason — even with two sensors — the Honor 8 isn't willing to do. The above nighttime shot sees the Honor 8 stick to ISO800 at 1/15; the OP3 ratchets up the sensitivity to ISO2000 at 1/17, and produces a much better photo as a result. Impressively, despite the increased light sensitivity, grain isn't an issue on the larger device.

In all, despite the extra sensor, I don't think the Honor 8 offers a superior photo-taking experience, from the software stack to the hardware itself. The OnePlus 3 consistently takes photos that, in my review, I preferred over its Huawei-built counterpart. That's not to say the differences are huge, but they're certainly noticeable.

Which should you buy? OnePlus 3

That's the big question, isn't it? Both the OnePlus 3 and the Honor 8 are surprisingly strong phones for $399, and each has its advantages over the other. While the Honor 8 is arguably more visually arresting, with its reflective glass backing that, especially in blue, draws the eye, the OnePlus 3 is more robust and is more likely to withstand a fall. It's also got a faster processor and slightly better camera, with software that doesn't feel as painted on as the Honor 8.

See at Hihonor

It remains to be seen whether the shakeup within the OnePlus software division negatively affects the quality of its releases in the long term. It's also going to be interesting to see whether Huawei can significantly improve the quality of its own EMUI and — even more important — push it out to the Honor 8 at a decent speed.

See at OnePlus

Until then, you can't go wrong with either phone, but you can go less wrong with the OnePlus 3.

OnePlus 3

OnePlus

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2 weeks ago

Huawei Mate 9 could pack dual 20MP cameras, Kirin 960 chip

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New big-screened Huawei phone looks to build on the P9's camera capabilities.

For the past couple of generations, Huawei's Mate series has been about packing the company's latest internals and camera tech into a big-screened handset — with suitably epic battery capacity to boot. And now we're getting our first look at how the next Mate might look. The shot below was posted on Chinese social network Weibo (via MyDrivers) and appears to reveal a few key data points about the unannounced phablet.

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2 weeks ago

These are the top Samsung phones you need to know

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These are the top Samsung phones you need to know

In the world of smartphones, it's impossible to ignore the influence of Samsung.

Since its explosion into Android with the launch of the Galaxy S2 globally, Samsung has firmly held on to the top spot in Android devices sold — and though the playing field has leveled off some in recent years the Korean manufacturer still has one of the most recognizable lines of phones out there today.

The "Galaxy" name gets spread around to its entire lineup of Android phones (and beyond), but when it really comes down to it there are just a handful of Samsung's high-end devices that you need to know about. Let us introduce you to the top phones from Samsung.

This article is updated periodically with the latest information. The latest update was made in September 2016.

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2 weeks ago

Best Android phone for kids

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The time has come. You've decided your kid needs a phone. These are their best options!

Russell has been covering Android since the G1, and has had his head in VR headsets since the first Oculus Rift dev kit. Managing editor at VRHeads, video and podcast host, you can follow him on Twitter @russellholly. For suggestions and updates, you can reach him at russell@androidcentral.com

*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Best overall

Nexus 5X

See at Amazon

Google's Nexus line offers the latest security updates on the least complicated version of the Android operating system, and the Nexus 5X is one of the best vehicles for this experience. Under that plastic casing you'll find an incredible camera, reasonable battery, and one of the fastest fingerprint sensors available today. It's a little overkill for "My First Smartphone," but given its common price point, and knowing it will last for quite awhile, you can buy it with confidence for your kid.

Bottom line: This is a great phone before you look at the price tag, which makes it that much easier to recommend.

One more thing: Nexus 5X comes in Carbon (Black), Quartz (White), and Ice (Mint Green) depending on where you shop.

Why Google's Nexus 5X is the best

For many people, buying a smartphone is all about getting the most important features at the most reasonable price. When purchasing a phone for their children, parents have a tendency to emphasize price over features. The Nexus 5X is a phone that genuinely lets you have both. While not quite as capable as the more expensive Nexus 6P, LG's partnership with Google has created an incredible phone by just about any standard. On top of guaranteed security updates, so you know your kid is using a phone that will keep their data safe, you're giving your child a great overall experience. This is hands-down the best phone for the money right now, and it's a phone that will work on any U.S. carrier should you decide to pack up and leave your current provider.

Best Value

Moto G4 Amazon Edition

See at Amazon

Maybe you're a parent who believes your children should save up their own money and buy their own phone. Or maybe you don't want that new phone to hit your wallet too hard. Either way, sometimes it really does come down to price. The Moto G4 has always been a decent phone for the price, but Amazon has taken that one step further by offering a special version with their lockscreen ads on board for $50 cheaper than the standard retail version. It means you get a phone for cheap that delivers a decent overall experience, and it works on all of the U.S. carriers.

Bottom line: This is a decent phone on its own, but if price is the biggest feature for you this is where you need to be.

Best on Verizon

Samsung Galaxy J3 V

See at Verizon Wireless

If you find yourself sitting in a Verizon Wireless waiting to add a phone to your account for a little one, there's a good chance you'll have iPhones and Droid Editions and several other phones recommended to you by the folks in the store. Before you put any money down, ask to see the Galaxy J3V by Samsung. It's a simple phone which claims 10 days of standby time and an extreme battery save mode that ensures your child should always be reachable. It's also only $7/month on Verizon's payment plan, so anyone can afford it.

Bottom line: If you need a Verizon phone and aren't looking to spend a lot, this is what you need.

Conclusion

Smartphones give you a little more information regarding where you kids are and what they're doing, but they also give your kid some freedom to have a little fun or get in some trouble. If you want the best for your kid, the Nexus 5X is where you need to be. If price is a real concern, Amazon's version of the Moto G is fantastic. Verizon Wireless subscribers who would rather buy in a store, be sure to ask about the Galaxy J3 V from Samsung.

Best overall

Nexus 5X

See at Amazon

Google's Nexus line offers the latest security updates on the least complicated version of the Android operating system, and the Nexus 5X is one of the best vehicles for this experience. Under that plastic casing you'll find an incredible camera, reasonable battery, and one of the fastest fingerprint sensors available today. It's a little overkill for "My First Smartphone," but given its common price point, and knowing it will last for quite awhile, you can buy it with confidence for your kid.

Bottom line: This is a great phone before you look at the price tag, which makes it that much easier to recommend.

One more thing: Nexus 5X comes in Carbon (Black), Quartz (White), and Ice (Mint Green) depending on where you shop.

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2 weeks ago

Honor 8 in blue facing UK stock shortage

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Other colors unaffected.

Fresh from the news that 1.5 million units have been sold worldwide, there's word that the Honor 8 will face stock shortages in the UK — at least in the popular blue color option.

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2 weeks ago

China recalls some Galaxy Note 7 handsets, bans use in-flight

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Galaxy Note 7s

No suggestion of a wider Chinese recall yet, as a different battery supplier is said to have been used in the country.

The Chinese authorities have recalled 1,858 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones partly sold "through an official Samsung website before the Sept. 1 launch, as part of a testing scheme," according to Reuters.

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2 weeks ago

Galaxy S8: Model numbers revealed as analysts predict early launch

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Samsung phones sign

Samsung reportedly skipping 'unlucky' model number for next flagship, which may launch earlier in 2017 due to the Note 7 recall.

We've already heard how the Galaxy S8 might come in two edge-screen models with 4K displays, and now further details on Samsung's internal designation for the new flagships have come to light. SamMobile, which has a pretty good track record for these things, says the big and small GS8s (Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus, perhaps?) are in development under the codename "Dream" and "Dream2."

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2 weeks ago

Best Verizon phones

Best Verizon Phones

Want a new Verizon phone? See the best the largest operator in the United States has to offer.

Whether you're an existing Verizon subscriber looking to upgrade, or you're thinking of switching over to Verizon and want to know what phones they offer; we're here to help.

We have put together our list of the best phones Verizon has to offer. We encourage you to read our reviews to learn more about each device we have featured, but if you are ready to pull the trigger, we have also included links to buy directly from Verizon.

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2 weeks ago

Google's fancy new Wallpaper app is the best thing about its leaked 'Pixel launcher'

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Pixel launcher

The launcher for Google's upcoming smartphones has leaked — but that's not even the most interesting part about it.

In the past day notorious HTC leaker @LlabTooFeR has leaked the latest version of Google's "Pixel launcher" — the home screen app that'll be preloaded on the two upcoming HTC-built Pixel phones (neé Nexus). Obviously it's important that this is branded as the Pixel launcher — removing any doubt that that's what this year's Google phones will be called. Also big: No more Google search bar, instead a Google "tab" icon you can drag out to get to Google Now. And the app drawer has changed significantly, almost moving back to the Android 2.x days where the drawer was a literal drawer that you'd pull up to see your apps.

All of that is important a neat, but what's way cooler is what Google's now doing with wallpapers.

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2 weeks ago

Samsung to limit recalled Note 7s to 60% battery in Korea as report blames 'production error'

51
Galax Note 7

OTA will mitigate the risk of explosions by limiting battery charge. Meanwhile a preliminary report to Korean regulators blames production error which "placed pressure on plates" in battery cells.

While Samsung won't be remotely disabling recalled Galaxy Note 7s anytime soon, it seems the company has a plan to mitigate the risk of further battery explosions — at least in its home market of Korea.

The Associated Press reports that Samsung will issue a software update to recalled Korean Note 7s still in use to stop them charging past 60% capacity. According to the report, Samsung took out a front-page ad in the Seoul Shinmun newspaper to inform customers.

We don't yet know if or when Note 7s outside of Korea will get the battery-limiting update.

The over-the-air update will begin at 2 a.m. KST on September 20 for any recalled Note 7 handsets still in the wild; there's no suggestion that the OTA will affect safe replacement units. We've reached out to Samsung for details on whether recalled Notes in other regions will get a similar OTA.

While limiting battery charge levels may reduce the likelihood of further fires or explosions in unsafe Note 7s, it's unclear what the side effects of actually applying the OTA will be. Android 6.0 phones like the Note 7 must recompile (or "optimize") installed apps after most software updates — a CPU-intensive process which produces a fair amount of heat. Introducing extra heat to a possibly defective battery could cause its own problems.

Meanwhile Bloomberg has news of a previously unpublished preliminary report to Korean regulators on the cause of the Note 7's battery issues. The report to the Korea Agency for Technology and Standards (KATS) body draws some early conclusions, but says more time is needed to pinpoint exactly what's going on.

Initial conclusions indicate an error in production that placed pressure on plates contained within battery cells. That in turn brought negative and positive poles into contact, triggering excessive heat. Samsung however stressed that it needed to carry out a more thorough analysis to determine "the exact cause" of battery damage.

Samsung has publicly stated that a "battery cell issue" was responsible for incidents of fires and explosions — of which 70 have now been reported in the U.S. alone — however this is the first we're hearing on the specific fault. Bloomberg echoes earlier reports that Samsung SDI, the group's energy and battery company, was responsible for making most of the affected cells.

Update: Reuters now reports that Chinese firm ATL will become the main battery supplier for the Note 7 from now on.

Samsung will soon launch an online tool to let Note 7 owners check if their handset is affected, based on their phone's unique IMEI number. The firm's advice remains that if your Note 7 is affected, you should switch it off and return it under the recall program.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Verizon AT&T T-Mobile Sprint

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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2 weeks ago

Honor 8: Challenges and opportunities ahead as sales pass 1.5 million

14
Honor 8

Honor's relationship with Huawei will soon bring huge software benefits — but it's unclear how a more fleshed-out Honor lineup might coexist with the parent brand.

At a recent event in China, Honor Vice President George Zhao announced that the Honor 8 had passed 1.5 million units sold in just two months. The phone went on sale first in China in July, before arriving in the West less than a month ago. Underscoring the rapid growth of Huawei's online-centric brand, Zhao also revealed that 100 million Honor phones had been sold in total throughout the brand's 999-day history.

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