Recent Articles | Android Central

Order Samsung Galaxy S8: AT&T | Verizon | T-Mobile | Sprint

Headlines

3 weeks ago

Apple Music for Android now looks way more like iOS

47

Who else just remembered that Apple Music for Android was a thing?

Apple Music for Android just received its first major update since its debut in the Play Store last summer. Version 2.0 brings with it on-screen lyrics and better navigation. The menu has also been reorganized into four major sections. Here's the full changelog for Apple Music:

  • An all-new design brings greater clarity and simplicity to Apple Music
  • Now Playing. Read lyrics for songs as you listen.
  • Library. Navigate your music easily and see the Downloaded Music you can play offline.
  • For You. Get recommendations for playlists, albums, and more—based on music you love.
  • Browse. Listen to new music first, plus playlists for any mood or activity.
  • Radio. Tune in to Beats 1 shows or listen to stations for any genre.

One major feature update to the Apple Music for Android app that wasn't mentioned in the change log was the adoption of a decidedly iOS-like aesthetic. There is virtually no Material Design display in the app, unless you count the three-pronged menu button to the left.

If you're intrigued, or you live a dual platform kind of life, you can download Apple Music in the Google Play Store. A subscription to the service costs $10 a month.

Are you a streaming music customer? Let us know in the comments!

The best streaming music services

Read more and comment

 
3 weeks ago

What is the Android Open Source project?

3

Google makes money from Android by giving it away to everyone else.

Android is a free open-source operating system. The AOSP (Android Open Source Project) is free to download, free to alter, free to build into a product that can power just about anything. But it's probably not something you've ever used when you picked up a phone or other gizmo that runs "Android".

Android is not a thing as much as something you use to make a thing.

At its heart, Android is nothing more than a platform that anyone can use to run applications plus the bits and pieces needed for it to talk to standard hardware. We tend to think of Android as an operating system for a phone or tablet (or even a watch or television), but it's just a part of the software needed to get any device to turn on and do things. That being said, it's one of the most important parts.

Having a huge library of code that anyone can use is great. Having all the things people build with it able to use the same applications is even better. It's better for us because we will have a huge list of applications that work out of the box when we buy an Android-powered device. It's better for the companies making the devices because we'll want to buy them and they don't have to put in the work to build their own application platform. It's also great for Google because it means more devices will be able to use the internet and its services.

That last part is why Google maintains the AOSP. Google has always held the belief that everyone should have access to the internet. While some of the reasons may be altruistic and good-natured, the main reason Google as a company has these goals is because the internet is how it makes money. All companies exist to make mone, but with the AOSP, Google has found a new way to make money from everyone while giving away one of its most expensive products: Android.

This is done through the AOSP. Google maintains the Android source code. That means exactly what you think it does: It keeps things clean and tidy and up-to-date, then makes it available for other people. It also has people working full time to make improvements and add new features to Android. All of this is made available for anyone to freely use under a liberal license that allows changes to be made to the code and not submitted back to the maintainers. Samsung is allowed to do whatever it wants with the AOSP. So are you, and so am I. If we do something different, we can keep those changes to ourselves to offer a (hopefully) better product than anyone else can.

But the phones and gadgets we buy aren't running the AOSP as an operating system. What we see is the end result of someone or some company using it to create software that is unique and their own. This can be done by changing the code or by adding more code or even adding applications that aren't open sourced like the AOSP is. Every company that sells Android-powered gadgets, including Google itself, is doing this. But even this fits into Google's methods to make money because there are some restrictions when a company wants to use Google's popular applications and services.

The process is a circle. Google gives Android away. A company uses it on its phone. As consumers, we want Android phones that can use Google Play and Gmail and Google Photos and all the other things that make Android great. The company making the phone can bundle those features in for free as long as it makes sure its product can use every other application found in the Google Play store. Phone manufacturers, like Samsung, save time and money by not building their own application platform and application storefront; we get a phone with access to all the apps we love plus a market with over a million others, and Google gets a lot of people using its services and being on the internet to see Google's ads.

By making Android a big piece of an operating system that anyone can use for free, Google's investment in it pays off.

This couldn't happen without Android being free to use, so the time and money Google invests in Android makes it a very lucrative part of its business. By providing Android as source code anyone can use instead of a standalone product like Windows, Google can reap the benefits while another company does the work of building and maintaining a living operating system. AOSP means everyone wins, and that's the way we like it.

Android Nougat

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
3 weeks ago

Grab the Certified Ethical Hacker Bootcamp for just $45!

Not all hacking is bad hacking. The word itself is associated with negativity usually, but it can be used for just as much good as it can bad. Have you ever thought how cool it would be to research vulnerabilities and try to discover them on your favorite websites while working for them? It would be pretty sweet, right? But, how do you even get started?

Become an ethical hacker for only $45! Learn More

Meet the Certified Ethical Hacker Bootcam, a perfect way to get going. The bootcamp offers access to more than 40 hours of content that you can access at any time of the day, along with nearly 150 lectures on different topics. From learning perimeter defenses to gaining practical experience with DDoS attacks and more, there is a wide variety of great information here that will help you advance your current career, or help you make a move to a new one.

The bootcamp includes:

  • Access 144 lectures & 45 hours of content 24/7
  • Study by taking 600+ exam questions
  • Gain practical experience w/ intrusion detection, policy creation, DDoS attacks, & more
  • Learn about perimeter defenses
  • Scan & attack your own networks
  • Understand Trojans, backdoors, viruses, worms, & more

This sure sounds like it would cost a lot, right? Well, normally this bootcamp is priced at over $5,000, but right now you can pay just a fraction of that. You won't set yourself into a financial debt to try and learn something new here.

Become an ethical hacker for only $45! Learn More

Priced at just $45 for a limited time you'll get everything mentioned above and even more. Don't miss out on this deal or you may regret it later.

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Twitter no longer counts names towards 140-character limit in replies

2

Twitter is making conversations better — and potentially more confusing.

We'll keep this brief: Twitter is a UX disaster. It's been that way for a long time, but the company, which is now public and not growing nearly fast enough to appease its shareholders, is aware of the problem.

To that end, it's done a number of things in the past year to improve the way conversations flow in the timeline. First it allowed users to retweet or quote tweet themselves (meh); it then stopped counting photos towards the 140-character limit (yay!). Now, the company no longer counts usernames towards that same limit — but only in replies.

When replying to a tweet, or to an existing thread, you now individually select the people included in the response as opposed to seeing those usernames piling up the tweet itself. That allows conversations to include considerably more people, but it also obfuscates the conversation itself, focusing on just the content. That's potentially a good or bad thing, depending on the way people prefer to use Twitter.

The company has been experimenting with this new format for months now, performing a number of A/B tests with users. Now that it's public and available to everyone on Android, iOS and the mobile web, it will be interesting to see the wider response.

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Best Chrome extensions for staying in touch

5
Best Chrome extensions for staying in touch

What are the best Chrome extensions for staying in touch?

**Updated March 30, 2017: We've updated our list with more great extensions for keeping in touch.

If you spend a lot of time on the internet and you love using Chrome, you probably know about extensions. With the amount of messaging and email utilities out there, some of the best can be lost in the pile. Maybe you want to schedule emails for future release, or maybe you want to quickly share articles or pictures with friends and followers. Maybe you need some help with your grammar while you write that email, or need some help translating sentences for friends you met while traveling. No matter your reason, here are the best Chrome extensions for staying in touch.

Facebook Messenger

Facebook Messenger

Anyone familiar with the mobile Facebook Messenger app will immediately realize the benefits of this extension. A small window showing your friends and recent chats pops open up at the side of your browser; share pictures, video, and text, and receive alerts when you receive messages.

See at Chrome Web Store


Point

Point

Sign into this extension with your Google account and begin sharing articles with friends. Share the article, highlight text while your friends are viewing, and chat in real time in a pop-out window. It's like you're sitting around a newspaper, holding a highlighter, talking about the subject. This app makes discussing news in the information age more effortless than ever before.

See at Chrome Web Store


Google Hangouts

Google Hangouts

What you have here is a built-in text, voice, and video chat extension for Chrome. Best part? It's all free. Chat with multiple people at once (great for meetings or family gatherings), send images and photos, and use over 850 emojis to express yourself. Hangouts even keeps a record of chats so you can go back and see who you should catch up with.

See at Chrome Web Store


Boomerang for Gmail

Boomerang

Boomerang allows you to take complete control over your Gmail inbox. Imagine: you're going to be offline for a couple of days but don't want your dear mother to worry about you. Schedule a reassuring message to send sometime during the period you're offline. This extension also lets you track messages and set reminders within Gmail, so you'll never forget to send an important email again.

See at Chrome Web Store


Grammarly

Grammarly

Although the internet does its best to destroy all languages, Grammarly is putting up a fight. Use their built-in text editor to ensure your writing is up to snuff before publishing or emailing, and receive real-time suggestions as you type around the internet. You can also copy and paste text from anywhere to verify grammar. The free version of Grammarly does a suitable job, but if you want to upgrade to Premium (deeper grammar check) it will cost you about $30 a month.

See at Chrome Web Store


Google Translate

Google Translate

Wish you could read web pages published in a foreign language? You can! With the web page open, just click the Translate button and choose to translate the entire page. If you'd like to translate a sentence or two, highlight the text and click the translate button. You can even hear how the words are pronounced in the specific language you're translating from. This is a great extension for anyone who loves to travel — keep up with friends you made in faraway lands.

See at Chrome Web Store


WhatsApp Messenger

WhatsApp

This WhatsApp extension pops out from Chrome in its own little window. It allows you to text friends also using WhatsApp as though you're using your phone — great for locations with internet but no cell service.

See at Chrome Web Store


Buffer

Buffer

Buffer lets you take content from the web and post it on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+. Just right click on an image or article and click on Buffer from the menu. You can also schedule posts and tweets for a later time, and you'll be able to track traffic around your content. This is a great extension for people who put out a lot of content on social media sites.

See at Chrome Web Store


Giphy for Gmail

Giphy for Gmail

Giphy lets you search GIFs by keyword to be inserted into your emails. Adding this extension to Chrome puts a small button in new Gmail messages; just click the button, search for a suitable GIF, and click it to insert. This is a fantastic way to spruce up your emails and is a big hit with everyone who uses it.

See at Chrome Web Store


Rapportive

Rapportive adds LinkedIn profiles directly to your Gmail. This extension will open up the LinkedIn profile of anyone who emails you. For those who gets dozens of emails every day, this can be particularly handy for keeping track of exactly who you are talking to. Having access to their whole LinkedIn profile while replying to emails also means that it's easier to set up meetings, and see pertinent information about where they work.

See at Chrome Web Store

<br clear="all>

Your choice?

What is your favorite Chrome extensions for keeping in touch? Let us know in the comments section below!

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

VorpX is amazing for playing non-VR games in VR

VorpX is amazing for playing non-VR games in VR

How do I use VorpX to play games in VR?

VorpX — it sounds like the name of an alien entity that wants to wrap itself around your head and not let go. Well, it's close. It works with the thing that wraps around your head, and you won't want to let it go.

The volume of questions surrounding VR and its link to the gaming community continues to expand at an incredible rate, and many questions involve VorpX. It's exciting, it's enabling, it's a work in progress. Intrigued? We're here to answer your questions about VorpX and its link to the emerging world of VR gaming.

Read more at VR Heads!

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to use the page zoom settings in Chrome

5

You can easily adjust the way your screen looks with Chrome.

Chrome makes surfing the web easier in a variety of different ways from awesome extensions that make your favorite apps accessible, to being able to quickly and easily adjust the settings.

If you've ever found yourself squinting while looking at the screen, or thought that the text was way too large, you probably want to adjust the zoom settings on your screen. It's ridiculously easy with Chrome, and we have the details for you here.

How to adjust zoom settings in Chrome

With Chrome, you have three basic options to adjust your zoom so that you have the view that you want. You can increase the resolution, decrease the resolution, or zoom and activate fullscreen in your Chrome window.

You'll also be able to what the current zoom percentage is.

First you want to click on the overflow icon: it looks like 3 vertical dots in the upper right hand corner of your screen. This will open up Chrome settings, including the Zoom settings. You can click on the + sign to increase the screen density, or the - sign to decrease the screen resolution. You'll also see what the current zoom percentage is on your screen. Adjusting the screen resolution this way will let you easily click to find the right size. On the right of the Zoom options, you'll also see an icon that allows you to fullscreen your Chrome window.

  1. Open Chrome.
  2. Click on the overflow icon in the upper right corner.
  3. Adjust your screen resolution size by clicking the zoom buttons.

Making sure that you can easily read everything on your screen when using Chrome doesn't have to be complicated. Google has made it easy for anyone to simply adjust the size things in their Chrome window with just a few clicks on your mouse or touchpad.

Do you end up resizing your screen often? Be sure to let us know about it in the comments below!

[custom:chrome]

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

The Android O Developer Preview is made for developers — it's right in the title

5

Not even Google thinks you should try the Android O developer preview if you're not a developer.

It's really cool that Google released a preview of Android O for everyone. Google has always made sure that developing for Android has almost no barriers and anyone can use the tools that they need to do it without paying any special developer fees or using specific equipment. If you're trying to attract as many great ideas as you can, this is a good way to do it.

There is a side effect, though. Seeing something called an Android O preview of any kind is both a temptation and invitation for people with no need to check out the new APIs and no plans to ever write an Android app to install it. People like you and me who just want to flash it to our phone because it's new. And sometimes that doesn't end well because the software Google is offering isn't ready for primetime.

What is a developer preview?

It's not Google's fault if we install a developer preview build of Android on our phone and things get all kinds of buggy. It says developer preview right on the download link and Google even tells you it's strictly something cobbled together so developers — people writing apps for Android or building things that run or work with Android — can see what's changing so they are ready.

Caution: Developer Preview 1 is for developers only and not intended for daily or consumer use. See the release notes before installing it on your device. Enrolling in updates by Android Beta is not supported in Developer Preview 1.

The emphasis is theirs, not ours, and this is simple language that tells us to back off and think before we do anything. Developer Preview 1 isn't even part of any beta software program just yet and nobody at Google will be surprised if everything here crashes and burns.

So why does Google release it to everyone?

This is the good part and the bad part.

Google says this is for developers, and Google wants all of us to be a developer. Or at least make being a developer accessible for all of us.

Google wants everyone to have access to all the developer tools and the Android O dev preview is yet another development tool.

Android development is a bit like the wild west. Anyone and everyone can do anything they like, and only a few places have specific rules that need to be followed in order to distribute your work. Every development tool from Google, including early access to future versions, is free and accessible for everyone. Google knows the next great idea may come from someone without the means to buy into a paid developer program and it wants that person to have the tools they need to build that great idea.

It's fair to gripe about a lot of things Google does when it comes to Android: it has a less than ideal license, all major development is done in private, and the platform distribution method not being the greatest are just a few. But there's one thing it does really well: You and I have the same access to developer tools as any Fortune 500 company does.

The Android O developer preview is just another one of those development tools.

Keep these things in mind

It's not Google's fault that we get enticed to give a first developer preview a try on our phones. It's our own fault, as nobody is saying we should even try it. But trying it isn't the worst thing we could do, especially if we think ahead.

If you're going to try it anyway, keep a few things in mind.

  • The Developer Preview 1 is not meant for you to install on a phone you'll use every day. Put it on a spare phone if you have one.
  • Every device you can try it on also has a custom recovery available. Take advantage of that and use it to back up your current system so you have an easy way to go back. If you like to try this sort of thing you should have an unlocked bootloader anyway.
  • If you don't know how to use a custom recovery to backup and restore the running system, are you sure you want to be fooling with a developer preview?
  • You don't have to install this one, and if you do there isn't much to see just yet. Future builds should be moved to the Android Beta program and will be more stable and easier to install.

Finally, it's OK not to care about it. Android O is something you probably won't see for at least a year unless you have a phone or tablet direct from Google. Some changes will look really great. Some will make your phone more secure. But none of them mean what you have now will work any differently than it did last week.

Besides, we can install it and talk about it for you. Let us deal with bad software!

Android O

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Facebook wants people to use its app for messaging again with new Stories feature

14

Facebook is adding Stories to its core app, and over 1.6 billion people will now get to know Snapchat, whether they realize it or not.

For years, Facebook has been about sharing with everyone — and doing a million other things, from selling products to joining groups to marking yourself as safe during emergencies. All of these things, together, have led to the service being the most-used Android app in the world, and overall the most popular digital platform on earth, with over 1.6 billion people hitting some form of Facebook's wide berth every day.

But since Facebook split Messenger from its core app, to participate in one-on-one communication you have to leave the app. Well, no more. Facebook has announced that it is adding Stories to its core app, taking a lot of Snapchat and a bit of Instagram and giving it a new front-and-center placement. Stories, which is rolling out worldwide to all Facebook mobile users on Android and iOS, is similar to what you see on Instagram (and Snapchat, of course) today. It is a feed of photos and videos that string together to form a 24-hour diary, replete with filters and other camera frills.

Facebook is acknowledging that filters, and the camera itself, is quickly replacing text as the important status update in peoples' days. The new camera interface will be available, as with Snapchat and Instagram, a swipe away on the left side of the app, and will offer live filters and effects (many of which will be sponsored) that can be added to photos and videos. They can either be added to one's story, which can optionally be shared to the main Facebook feed, or sent using Direct, to a single person or group of people. Either way, the content will expire within 24-hours.

Direct is an interesting addition, because it ostensibly makes the core Facebook app a competitor to its own Messenger, along with WhatsApp and Instagram, all of which incorporate their own versions of private messaging. It's unclear whether Facebook plans to consolidate these things down the line, or just slowly add asynchronous story sharing to all of its apps, but it will be interesting to see whether people actually want this to be in the core Facebook experience.

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Truecaller picks up huge update with Google Duo integration, payment support in India

10

Truecaller is doubling down in India.

Truecaller has announced that it is teaming up with Google to offer support for Google Duo from within its interface. The tie-in will boost the capabilities of Truecaller's dialer, which will now offer the ability to make video calls via Google's messaging client.

With Truecaller boasting over 150 million users just in India, the integration is a win-win for both companies. The integration will go live sometime on both Android and iOS in the coming months, and will be an opt-in feature.

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Ace the Project Management Professional (PMP) exam with this certification prep course, now just $49.99

Whether you are looking to start a new career or just advance the one you are in currently, you'll need some certifications under your belt to make you stand out above the others. Unfortunately, getting certifications can be a time consuming and expensive process. You need time to study, money to pay for the courses, and then you just have to hope that you can keep up with that and your regular job. Well, it doesn't have to be that way.

Master Project Management for less! Learn More

How does lifetime access to more than 76 courses that contain just shy of 40 hours of training sound? Well, with this awesome certification training package you can work towards becoming certified in one of the industry's most respected certification organizations. You'll be able to access the material 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, so you can do things on your schedule, and this will also help you meet that 35 contact-hour requirement for the exam and certification.

For just $50 you'll have access to:

  • Get lifetime access to 76+ courses & 35+ hours of training
  • Become certified by one of the industry's most respected & in-demand certification organizations
  • Take lessons from a company that's approved by Project Management Institute® to meet the strict educational criteria necessary to earn the PMP® & CAPM®certifications
  • Access the material 24/7 so you can learn when you have time
  • Meet the 35 contact-hour requirement for the PMP® exam & certification
  • Maintain your certification by meeting the required Professional Development Units

Normally, this certification training would set you back nearly $1,500, but if you act quick you can pay just a small fraction of that. What better way to work towards you new goal than on your own schedule, right?

Save big for a limited time! Learn More

Don't miss out on this huge 96% savings because this deal won't last forever. Make the purchase now, and thank yourself later.

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

How to set up Google Photos

22

Never lose a photo again, once you've set up Google Photos.

Having access to all of your photos at a swipe is kind of like living the dream, at least for many photographers it is. If you're snap-happy, then you owe it to yourself to make sure that you never lose another photo again with Google Photos. This service will back up, store, and organize your photos so that as soon as you capture that moment it's protected from accidental deletion when your phone runs out of storage space. Getting everything set up is a quick process, provided you already have a Google account, and in many cases comes preloaded on your phone.

Why use Google Photos?

While we may think of our phones as a repository for our entire lives, they have finite storage space. When you broach that limit, having your photos backed up means that you can delete them off of your phone without losing them entirely. Likewise, if your phone suffers a tragic fall, or swim in the pool, and doesn't survive, your photos will.

By saving and uploading your photos to a personal cloud, you can share them and access them from whatever device you like. For parents especially this service becomes invaluable in ensuring that you get to keep every memory in technicolor.

Step by step instructions for setting up Google Photos

  1. Open Google Photos.
  2. Sign in to your Google account.
  3. Choose desired quality setting.

  4. Wait for your Photos to sync, and get started!

Step by step instructions for choosing device folders

  1. Open Google Photos
  2. Tap the overflow icon that looks like 3 lines in the upper left corner of your screen
  3. Tap the gear icon to open Settings

  4. Tap the first option, Back up and sync
  5. Tap Back up device folders
  6. Tap the toggle to choose which folders are backed up to Google Photos

Step by step instructions for choosing image upgrade quality

When setting up your Google Photos account, you also have a choice in your image upload quality. There are two options open to you, high quality, or original quality. Choosing high quality will score you unlimited storage, with photos stored at 16MP and videos stored at 1080p. Choosing original quality will count against your Google account storage, but all photos and videos are stored at the quality you shot them — including RAW files. This especially handy if you're shooting in resolutions higher than 16MP, or in RAW.

It's also worth noting that Pixel users get free storage of all photos and videos in original quality, without it counting against your Google account storage.

Choose your image quality while setting up Google Photos

  1. Open Google Photos.
  2. Follow the directions to set up an account.
  3. When the Back up and sync page appears tap on change settings.
  4. Choose between original and high quality for your uploads.

Change your image quality in the settings

  1. Open Google Photos.
  2. Tap on the overflow icon that looks like 3 horizontal lines in the upper left corner.
  3. Tap on Settings

  4. Tap on Back up and sync.
  5. Tap on Upload size.
  6. Choose your image quality to upload.

Do you use Google Photos to save all of the shots on your camera roll? Is there a part of setting up Google Photos that we missed? Do you still have questions about getting Google Photos set up and ready to go? Be sure to drop us a comment below and let us know all about it!

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Best Chrome extensions you didn't know about but should be using

110
10 Chrome extensions you didn't know existed but should be using

What are the best Chrome extensions I should be using?

Update 24 March 2017: We've refreshed this list to ensure you're kept up to the latest when it comes to the best Chrome extensions you should be using.

The amount of time most people spend browsing the internet continues to rise each year, and Google's Chrome browser attempts to be the most comfortable and versatile browser out there. To aid in its quest, Google allows for developers to market small software extensions that modify and (in most cases) ameliorate your browsing experience. Here are 10 Chrome extensions you didn't know about but should be using.

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

1Password gives an early look at one of Android O's best features

17

Android O is bringing a new way for password managers and other apps to autofill information. Here's how it works.

Whenever Google introduces a new version of Android, there's always a silent disclaimer to go along with it: few of these features will be available until developers add them to their apps. Well, one developer hasn't wasted much time showing what its implementation of one major O feature will look like: AgileBits, Toronto-based creator of popular password manager, 1Password, has uploaded a proof-of-concept showing off the new Autofill API.

Video Playerhttps://blog.agilebits.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/autofill-demo.mp400:0500:0000:16Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.

From 1Password's blog:

As you can see in the video, after navigating to the login page in the Twitter app, the Autofill Framework notified 1Password that there were some fields that could be filled. 1Password then responded by letting the Autofill Framework know it recognized those fields as a login form, but that it needed to be unlocked first. I was then prompted to unlock 1Password if I wanted to continue.

After I unlocked 1Password with my fingerprint, my example Twitter credentials were displayed in a dropdown provided by the Autofill Framework and automatically filled when I tapped on them.

It really does seem that simple, and I'm grateful, because auto-filling is one of the best features in 1Password today, but it relies on an accessibility hack that most people won't be willing to go through. Once O is released (and widely-available, natch) such a feature will be a breeze to activate.

Everything you need to know about Android O

Android O

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

Read more and comment

 
1 month ago

Facebook is testing out animated GIFs for comments in its Android app

9

The social network finally gives in to what the people really want.

The GIF is alive and well, folks, and it appears Facebook has finally caught on to its ubiquity. The social network is officially exploring its relationship with these animated images. It will soon begin testing the ability to add GIFs to comments in your feed.

In an email to TechCrunch, a Facebook spokesperson confirmed the addition of animated GIFs:

Everyone loves a good GIF and we know that people want to be able to use them in comments. So we're about to start testing the ability to add GIFs to comments and we'll share more when we can, but for now we repeat that this is just a test.

Those of you with poor internet connections or slower computers, you don't have to worry too much. Facebook won't allow embedded GIFs in the main feel; they'll be ostensibly limited to use as reactions to main posts. The company wants to avoid the images become distractive, or disruptive to the main news feed.

But at the same time, the ability to comment on posts with an animated GIF should have been implemented a while ago. Most mainstream messaging apps and services already support animated GIFs, and I bet you can't go a few hours without someone dropping in an animated Imgur link. The GIF has no plans of leaving the internet anytime soon.

Read more and comment

 
Show More Headlines

Pages