Samsung's Gear 360 is a nifty accessory for shooting 360-degree videos and photos. In a recent blog post the South Korean vendor has detailed the hardware powering the camera.

Samsung Gear 360

The Gear 360 is encased in an IP53 dust and splash resistant spherical shell. The distinction is that while the Gear 360 can withstand the occasional splash of water, it won't fare so well should you decide to dunk it in a pool. The glass covering the sensor is the first tempered glass with a circular design. Then there's a front bracket, which while adding rigidity to the camera offers a 0.5-inch 72 x 32 PMOLED display on the side, giving you the ability to quickly choose image and video shooting modes. In addition to standard video modes, you get the ability to shoot time-lapse and looping videos.

At its core, the Gear 360 sports two f/2.0 15MP fisheye lenses, with each offering the ability to record images and videos in 195 degrees. The software stitches the view from both cameras to create stunning 360-degree content, with a resolution of 3,840 x 1,920 for videos and 7,776 x 3,888 for photos. Then there's an accelerometer and gyroscope, which adjust the camera motion to ensure you get a full 360-degree exposure.

The mainboard consists of a CPU and DRIMe5s image processor, and a microSD slot that can accommodate cards up to 200GB in size. Heat dissipation is taken care of by a copper plate and TIM (thermal interface materials). Just from an engineering point of view, it is very interseting to see how Samsung managed to cram all of the hardware into the Gear 360's miniscule form factor.

The Gear 360 offers Wi-Fi Direct, Bluetooth, NFC and a USB port for connectivity, and a 1350mAh battery that lets you record video for 140 minutes. The 360-degree camera is available in select countries, and will go up for sale in the U.S. sometime next month.