We've heard the cries. "Why isn't Google fighting back on the patent front?!?!" Trust us, there are people in suits working on this every day. And today David Drummond, senior vice president and Google's chief legal officer, penned a blog post explaining what's going on, saying:

Android’s success has yielded something else: a hostile, organized campaign against Android by Microsoft, Oracle, Apple and other companies, waged through bogus patents.

Drummond recaps what you've likely already read -- that Microsoft, Apple and others worked together (or ganged up, depending on who you ask) to outbid Google for suites of patents from Nortel and Novell, plus the spate of lawsuits demanding licensing fees for every handset -- or demanding that they not be allowed into the United States at all.

So what's Google doing about it? Drummond's post doesn't really say anything we didn't expect, calling the bidding process an "anti-competitive strategy" that caused the winning price of the patents -- $4.5 billion -- to go way over what they're actually worth, and that "the law frowns on the accumulation of dubious patents for anti-competitive means." He continues that Google's lobbying the Justice Department to investigate the patent auction for anti-competitive practices, which it's rumored to be doing, and that Google's going to beef up its own patent portfolio, which it's also said to have been working on.

While you should read the entire post (link's below), we find zero surprises in any of that. Question remains: How will it play out?

Source: Google Blog