Samsung

It's not all that often we hear of Samsung acquiring other companies that's exactly what they've done with cloud content service provider mSpot. As noted in the press release, Samsung will be making use of mSpot's cloud services to bring such content as music, video and radio services to Samsung devices:

“mSpot shares our vision to bring a best-in class cloud and streaming entertainment experience to consumers, and they’ve backed it up with great technical solutions from a great engineering team,” said TJ Kang, Senior Vice President of Samsung Electronics’ Media Solution Center.

For now it seems as though Samsung bought into the company as a whole meaning, they now own the technology, assets and human resources that mSpot holds. Financial details of the matter have not as of yet been disclosed. You can read the full press release from Samsung Electronics below.
 

Samsung Electronics Acquires mSpot
 
Palo Alto, Calif. – May 9, 2012 – Samsung Electronics, Co., Ltd., a global leader in digital media and digital convergence technologies, announced today it is acquiring mSpot, Inc., a leading mobile cloud contents service provider based in Palo Alto, California.
 
The acquisition will provide a cloud entertainment experience of music, video and radio services for users of Samsung devices, while extending mSpot’s cloud and streaming solutions to a broader base of global entertainment fans. The combination will extend mSpot’s top class cloud and streaming services, while further enhancing Samsung’s mobile and tablet device entertainment offerings. The mSpot entertainment services will be a key pre-installed offering on newly announced Samsung mobile devices.
 
“mSpot shares our vision to bring a best-in class cloud and streaming entertainment experience to consumers, and they’ve backed it up with great technical solutions from a great engineering team,” said TJ Kang, Senior Vice President of Samsung Electronics’ Media Solution Center.
 
“Samsung is unparalleled in terms of global reach and cutting edge devices; with our combined resources, we are looking forward to redefining media consumption across the mobile universe with cloud services,” said mSpot Chief Executive Officer Daren Tsui.
 
The acquisition will include the full scope of technology, assets and human resources under mSpot.  Further details of the transaction were not disclosed.
 
About Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
 
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. is a global leader in semiconductor, telecommunication, digital media and digital convergence technologies with 2011 consolidated sales of US$142.2 billion. Employing approximately 190,500 people in 206 offices across 68 countries, the company consists of nine independently operated business units: Visual Display, Mobile Communications, Telecommunication Systems, Digital Appliances, IT Solutions, Digital Imaging, Memory, System LSI and LED. Recognized as one of the fastest growing global brands, Samsung Electronics is a leading producer of digital TVs, mobile phones and semiconductor chips. For more information, please visit www.samsung.com.
About mSpot

mSpot was formed in 2004 and is a provider of innovative music and video delivery service for mobile devices. The company has been providing white-labeled cloud entertainment services for major US mobile carriers. It also has its own brand services available in the Android Marketplace or App Store. For more information, go to www.mspotcorporate.com

 

Reader comments

Samsung Electronics acquires cloud content service provider mSpot

4 Comments

Samsung has all this stuff. Assorted programs and services.
Now put a couple of people in a Samsung office with a whiteboard and pens and coffee and little triangle sandwiches, and sort out a coherent message of what things are and how they all link together.

If you are going to copy Apple, steal the good practices of their operation and make it all make sense.

Part of the reason I'm not a fan of Apple products is they lock you down to their stuff. While their stuff is often nice, it's not often the solution I'm looking for, and the chance of getting Apple to do something different is slim to none. One of the draws (again, to me) of Google was the approach to make a solution, but not tie it to a product.

Why is that phone OEM's feel the need to offer services? I don't want to use a service tied to an OEM, because I might not want to use that OEM's equipment in the future. Knowing the paths, it's often difficult to get your data back and shared elsewhere if you change brands.

What is it in consumer trends that leads OEM's to believe this is the right solution? Do they see brand loyalty tied to the services, and not to the hardware / interface? I use my phone... that means build quality, useability, comfort, etc. are important to me and leads me to look at the same brand in the future. I'm going to be more loyal to the OS I'm using than I am to a feature set of a particular phone.

I'm guessing others are brand loyal to software/features like this, or the OEM wouldn't do it... personally I think it's the wrong approach. OEM's are picking up independent companies like this before they get a chance to be cross platform, and it's preventing growth in features and hampering customer experiences / solutions.