Apps of the Week

Games, tools and widgets -- we've got them all here

Welcome back to yet another edition of our Apps of the Week post, where we highlight apps from the Android Central writers. Now these aren't always the newest or most popular apps, but they're the ones that have worked well enough for us to stay installed for the last week -- and that's saying something.

From games and casual apps to tools and widgets, we cover all the bases. Stick around with us after the break and see how this week stacks up.

Simon Sage - You Don't Know Jack

You Don't Know Jack

I'm not much of a guy for Trivia Night, but You Don't Know Jack has been a favorite game of mine since back in the day when they did weekly webisodes. Their recent push into mobile has kept the irreverent, hilarious, and fast action of the original, though with a freemium twist. You can only play so many times a day, though you can spend your in-game winnings for extra rounds. Leaderboards are always at the forefront, since YDKJ has always promoted unhealthy and mean-spirited competition. In addition to straight-up multiple choice trivia questions, there are a few other match modes like the Jack Attack and Dis or Dat which keeps things interesting. Even if you're not a big trivia buff, play a few rounds of YDKJ - you won't be disappointed. 

Download: You Don't Know Jack (Free)

Jerry Hildenbrand - Dashlane Password Manager

Dashlane Password Manager

If you're like me, you have logins spread all over the Internet. There's no way you can keep up with them all if you use separate and secure passwords, and writing them all down on post-it notes isn't a very good solution. For folks like us, a password manager is a must. I've used several, including some popular ones as well as some not-so-popular ones, but I think I've stumbled across the one I'll be keeping -- Dashlane Password Manager.

With the same features as some of the more expensive options, like AES-256 encryption, secure password generation and smart autofill (a must while using on the small screen of a phone) the free version of Dashlane works really well. Even the free desktop version (Windows and Mac OS) has plenty of features and configurable plug-ins for Chrome, Firefox and Safari. The app and the desktop program do everything you'd want or need from a password utility, all for free.

There is a premium version of Dashlane, and for $20 a year you can have unlimited devices synchronized through the service (the free version limits you to one mobile device) if you're that person who has a bunch of devices laying around. Give Dashlane a try and I'll bet you find it suits your needs. 

Download: Dashlane Password Manager (Free)

Andrew Martonik - reClock

reClock Widget

I'm usually one to have the home screens on my phone laid out as efficiently as possible, limiting the amount of flair that looks nice but just gets in the way. But every once and a while I come across a widget that draws my attention enough to want to use precious screen real estate on it. That widget this time around is reClock, and as the name would suggest its a clock widget, but this one has an unconventional time display. Right off the bat it uses words rather than a traditional clock face, but reClock goes one further and doesn't display the time in a standard format -- it makes you think about it.

Rather than saying "Twelve Fourty Three PM" or something of the like, reClock will say "Eleven after Twelve Thirty Two" or "Four Till Twelve Fourty Seven", making a bit of a word puzzle that you have to think about in order to consider the time. It's a fun way to think about a clock that probably isn't for everyone, but those looking for a funky design and an original clock this may enjoy it. It's available for free with a whole bunch of font, color and display options with an in-app donation (of about $1.40) to unlock even more.

Download: reClock (Free, Donation)

Alex Dobie - Falcon Pro

Falcon

I'll admit it -- since the official Twitter client for Android got updated with a new Holo-centric design, swiping between tabs and no more ugly menu button, that's what I've been using for my mobile tweeting. But Falcon Pro has received a big update this week which has tempted me back from the official app. In version 2.0, Falcon now supports multiple accounts -- a long-requested feature for those of us managing an organization's accounts as well as our own. In addition, swiping between tabs is now possible on Android 3.0+ devices, and there's a sleek new "black" theme to complement the grey and white skins.

Falcon Pro is one of the best Android Twitter clients still standing, and it's well worth your two bucks. Grab it from the link below.

Download: Falcon Pro ($1.96)


Happen to miss previous editions of our weekly app picks? You can check them out right here. Our continuing weekly app coverage can also be seen right here as well.

 

Reader comments

Apps of the Week: You Don't Know Jack, Dashlane Password Manager, reClock and more!

24 Comments

Having used Ewallet and SplashID on other platforms, Safewallet and now Datavault on android, you will wonder how you lived without a password manager. I wonder if it is available for ios. I see it's for mac, so I would assume so.

I've been a Safewallet user since the pocket pc days. I love that it syncs seamlessly between my android phone, windows laptop, ipad, and the web. I'm never without a password.

Edit: I would no longer recommend Safewallet. Support for Android is effectively gone and syncing with other devices no longer works.

Well that *IS* a joke then.

Meanwhile, here is a review taken from Play:

"You have to sign in using Facebook. You only get one free game a day after that you have to use coins. Each game is like 5 questions. That's it."

F'ing Facebook again. Yeesh. Combine limited play and ingame purchase crud to ruin what could be a great game :(

Yep they ruined YDNJ, F$ck EFFBook, why they hell does everything require EFFbook. 5 questions is a full game? what a bad joke? Paid tokens to keep playing. Rated 1 star which i rarely ever do.

Not compatible with Note 10.1 either. So that's two of my devices that it doesn't work with. Oh well, Facebook login means I wouldn't use it anyway.

There's something disconcerting about using a password management app that has Internet access... It leaves me uneasy, but I see so many other folks using them and I wonder if I'm just too paranoid or others are too trusting, especially when there are so many password management apps in the Play Store with and without Internet access. Am I alone in this concern?

You are not alone. And I am extremely leery of a password management app that is not open source.

I think that concern is acceptable, but is like everything, if you don't like it don't use it.
I hate it when ideas get trashed just cause some don't like it.

Yeah, because, you know, your passwords don't really matter much. Just give them out to any app or person. Worrying about security is just so paranoid, so tinfoil hat. If you have nothing to hide, then no harm done. Stop being a terrorist and unpatriotic- freedom and privacy are highly overrated.

It may be a concern but just not a valid one if you expect it to sync with a desktop or other devices. The better question would be to ask would be whether or not the password database is encrypted locally or kept in a text file. Some PW managers keep the list as an un-encrypted text file. Also, another good question to ask would be how the sync occurs. Some managers use things like Dropbox which also adds a vulnerability. Is the sync on encrypted servers or better yet, point-to-point.

Jerry
Have you used Lastpass? Could you compare Dashlane to Lastpass for me? Is there a reason to use one over the other? I realize that this topic isn't Android specific, but I would be interested in reading your thoughts on it.