T-Mobile will donate $10,000 for every home run during the MLB postseason, as well as $1 for tweets using #HR4HR.

Mother Nature can be truly terrifying at times, and this point has been reinforced beyond belief with the recent hurricanes of Harvey, Irma, and Maria. The devastation caused by these natural disasters will have an impact on our world for years to come, but in an effort to speed up the recovery process, T-Mobile has announced its #HR4HR relief fund.

T-Mobile's #HR4HR stands for Home Runs for Hurricane Recovery, and T-Mobile is using its sponsorship with the MLB to pledge $10,000 donations for every postseason home run that's hit throughout the year. T-Mobile has already raked in $140,000 worth of donations thanks to 14 home runs that were hit during the Wild Card games for the MLB's American League Division Series, and the carrier says that it plans on donating a minimum of $1 million (hopefully more) once all is said and done.

$1 will be donated for every tweet using #HR4HR.

In addition to the $10,000 pledge for each home run that's hit, T-Mobile also says that it'll donate $1 for every Tweet that's sent out using the hashtag #HR4HR. Donations sent in with these tweets will go up to $500,000, and that's on top of any money donated through baseball players' home runs. And, along with its own efforts, T-Mobile also wants to remind people that you can still text MARIA, HARVEY, or IRMA to 90999 to make a $10 donation to the American Red Cross.

Per T-Mobile's CEO and President, John Legere:

Puerto Rico, Texas, and Florida are home to some of the biggest baseball fans in the world, and they need our help. So we're stepping up. Plus, throughout the MLB Postseason, we're turning the biggest moments of the game into moments that really matter with every home run worth $10,000 – and every fan's tweet with #HR4HR adding to the relief effort.

In addition to the money it'll be giving through #HR4HR, T-Mobile also hopes that it'll be able to create awareness for hurricane relief outside of its own program as well.

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