Gingerbread Android 2.3

We've been talking about the next version of Android -- (still) unofficially dubbed Gingerbread -- as far back as a year ago -- months before Froyo was ever announced. But what we haven't really known was what version number it will be. Android 3.0 has been thrown around, as has Android 2.5.

Another version that's been mentioned -- and now has a little more weight to it -- is Android 2.3. The snippet above is from Google's "issues" repository -- basically a place for anyone to report a bug or request a feature. Issue 8804 refers to problems connecting to corporate Wifi after the Froyo update (specifically, "wpa_supplicant 0.6.10 (froyo) unable to auth in a wpa2/enterpise wifi"). A googler on Sept. 30 responded that a patch will be available in the next "major release" -- Android 2.3.

So there you go. Definitive proof? Not yet. But definitely a pretty strong sign. [Google] Thanks, Jesta!

 

Reader comments

Will Gingerbread be Android 2.3?

27 Comments
I have nothing to do with Google, so this is all just a guess -- Usually a big jump in versioning (i.e. 1.5 to 2.0) means a large number of changes or complete re-write to the core. In this case, that means the framework. A jump from 2.2 to 2.3 would usually signal small changes to things. Small is relative though. Google could completely change the UI to look like Blur, and as long as they don't overhaul the framework, that would be a "small" change. My gut tells me that 2.3 will be a huge list of bugfixes, work to enhance the functionality of existing parts of the OS, and visual changes to the OS that the new team has ready for release. A version that brings things like resolution changes for tablets, or new goodies in the OS, would be a big jump to 3.x

- Google could completely change the UI to look like Blur -

Allegedly they will be changing it to look/behave more like HTC Sense.

All the info out there confirms your thinking, that there will be a lot of visual updates to unify everything a little tighter, such as more uniform icons. It will also support larger screens, supposedly includes speed improvements across the board, and breaks out most/all of the "bundled" apps as separate app store items and similar changes designed to make carrier updates easier. It allegedly includes a native video chat application to replace Qik (that ties in to Google Voice), and could also include the new Google Music service. I wouldn't be surprised if there was something to tie GoogleTV into the mix a little better as well.

But of course nothing is ever a done deal until it's released, right?

Well makes kinda sense especially since all the updates have been going little by little from original to 1.5 I think then 2.0 after 2.1 and then recently froyo 2.2 it'd b weird to all of a sudden go 3.0

2.3 is the verizon ssyem NOT the android version! I have a droid x, it says versizon system 2.3.2 (or something like that) and android 2.2 - all in the details my friend! :)

VZW has started naming their own versions of software starting with the droidx and also on the d2. I don't believe this has anything to do with the android version. I have 2.4.5 on my d2 right now. Is this Honeycomb? jk

Someone should make a fake that says android version 99.9 just to shut people up and call it android "yogurt", only problem is people would be asking whats next! ;)

From the leaked screen shots that I have been seeing, that should be 2.3. There was nothing I saw that made me think that they should have called it 3.0. When 3.0 arrives, I'm looking for something drastically different, and those leaked screen shots weren't!

Not sure what they're referring to, but typically a "major release" changes the first number in the version, and "minor release" changes the second number. So, a "major release" would be going to 3.0, and a "minor release" would be going to 2.5. But this is all if the terminology being used is consistent with typical development and software releases.

What I would like Google to do is take the "upgrading" out of the hands of the carriers and assume full responsibility for sending Gingerbread to as many handsets that can support it. The only thing the carriers need to test is the CDMA/GSM radio to make sure that the telephony & data services work properly.

Carriers can submit their custom apps to the Android Market just like every other app vendor.

However, it would be great if Google upgraded all of stuck at whatever version of Android we have, and upgrade every handset up to to Android 2.3. I know it won't happen, but Google could really irk many customers if they allow carriers to continue to fragment the phones.

The problem is that there is a certain level of customization per phone that is necessary, especially in the drivers area. With, say, Windows, you have a big DVD with lots of the most common drivers, and a full set of vanilla basic drivers that provide basic enough functionality. These work until you're on the internet (or Windows Update) at which point you can update. With Android, you need apply at least a partial ROM to update, and a lot of decisions need to be made at build time of the ROM.

Right now Android runs on a lot of phones and carriers. They have one official phone, the Nexus One, that works much like the iPhone, much like what you would probably want. It would be a lot of work for Google to support every Android device out there individually.

Great... yet another update with bug fixes that Samsung will take forever to release.

Why cannot updates like this be distributed OTA without the carriers beining involved. If it is a complete version change (like 2.x to 3.x) then fine. However a dot release should just be a patch that does not need to have carrier sanctioning.

What I want to know is will any of todays high end phones, EVO, Droid, Incredible, Galaxy, etc.. be receiving the official update. Or will we have to upgrade our phones yet again to enjoy the new version?

For real all of this is easy to change. My phone say android version 3.1 and build grg10d. It was a joke with the build prop by the rom developer.

This has to be the most depressing news story I have ever read. I used to quite enjoy being a geek. Now I realise I'm supposed to care about the name and version number of operating systems, as if it in some way has some effect on something.

Beyond that I'm supposed to swallow stuff like this as a news story? Really? Did it take you all day this one? Did you go to journalism school for this? Really?

You've actually managed to push me to the point where I sigh and say "It's only a bloody phone".

Hi, tipster here. I'm surprised at all the negative comments for news like this. Was this post so large and inviting that you missed all the other "more interesting" news? Some of us are excited about the version number. I, for one, am.