Opera Mobile for Android

Opera CEO Jon Von Tetzchner in the fall said Opera Mobile one day would be released for Android, and that day has come.

Sort of.

Opera this morning announced its new cross-UI framework, which in layman's terms means the browser should look, feel and act the same whether on Windows Mobile Symbian, Android, etc.

And so, Opera Mobile is ready for Android. But you can't have it, unless you're an OEM or network operator. Why, you ask? Says Opera, "Currently, these platforms present limitations that hinder mass consumer distribution."

OK, then. We'll wait. But check after a jump for a video of Opera Mobile on Android, and what they mean by cross-UI. [via Opera]

 
There are 8 comments

CJ says:

Doesn't look all that compelling to me.

hmmmmm says:

What doesn't? This is aimed at operators and OEMs.

MicroNix says:

Opera, the buggy, perpetual beta browser has to be the *worst* on
the market. I've never seen anything worse. It will never be installed on my Droid!!

um says:

Say what?

Geez, talk about negativity.

Perpetual beta? That's Google, not Opera. Opera Mini 5 has only been out in beta for a while.

Anonymous says:

Ok I think you dont really know what you're talking about:
on android market there is opera MINI 4, it's crappy and not very usefull!

there is opera MINI 5 out there now, which is better but not available for android

here in this news, the atuhor is talkink about opera MOBILE!! which is kind of full opera browser for mobile devices, not like lightweight opera mini for not-so-powerfull mobile phones with java EE!!!

RickB says:

OK, I think that between the video, and the accompanying explanation for lack of availability, are two of the stupidest things I've ever heard and read (or, read and heard).

First of all, how the hell do they state "these platforms present limitations that hinder mass consumer distribution." and expect that to be accepted as valid on Android? The statement makes no sense at all in general, and specifically with regard to Android, it's patently false. The entire mobile industry is moving - and rapidly - toward mass consumer distribution of applications (that is, if it isn't there already).

Second stupid explanation: "Due to the framework being cross platform, you can enjoy the same browsing experience across all platforms." Nifty. How many different platforms (i.e., phones) do typical people carry in their pocket? And really, is it that difficult for a Droid user to pick up an iPhone and browse? When you use a Symbian device, do you really find yourself withering at the challenge of a misunderstood browser? I mean, it's the frikking WEB for gosh sakes, the experience is about the content, not browser cross-platform similarity.

Jeez, I used to like Opera, but they seem to be lost in the wilderness.

wut says:

First of all, how the hell do they state "these platforms present limitations that hinder mass consumer distribution." and expect that to be accepted as valid on Android? The statement makes no sense at all in general, and specifically with regard to Android, it's patently false.

Nonsense. It's exactly true. Opera Mobile is a native C++ application. There is no distribution mechanism for that at the moment.

Second stupid explanation: "Due to the framework being cross platform, you can enjoy the same browsing experience across all platforms." Nifty. How many different platforms (i.e., phones) do typical people carry in their pocket?

Duh. This is an announcement for OEMs and carriers. They usually have several different platforms, and Opera's unified UI lets them add the same experience across all platforms.

Jeez, I used to like Opera, but they seem to be lost in the wilderness.

Actually, they are not. You are, judging by your ignorant comments.

Get a clue, please.

Anonymous says:

The hype is there but I wonder of the product will live up too it....