Android Central.

Android Central @ CESLong-rumored and variously leaked, Polaroid's Android-powered iM1836 interchangeable-lens camera was on show public for the first time at CES 2013. Unfortunately, none of Polaroid's prototype iM1836 units were working, but we were able to get acquainted with the device's physical hardware, which coming form the beastly Galaxy Camera seems positively diminutive.

The iM1836 is constructed of glossy plastic, and the build quality isn't the best out there. But on the other hand, you're getting smartphone functionality on a camera at the $350 price point.

It's packing an 18.1 sensor, although because the demo units were nonfunctional, we were unable to test its photographic capabilities. Consulting the spec sheet, it appears the iM1836 will also include an HDMI type b port, "HD" video recording, panoramic pictures and ISO up to 3200 and a pop-up flash. Storage is provided through a microSD slot. The kit lens is a 10-30mm f/3.0-5.6 attachment, and Polaroid tells us an adapter will allow it to work with other micro four-thirds lenses.

On the Android side, Polaroid promises Android 4.1 Jelly Bean. Various capacitive buttons along the side of the 3.5-inch tilting screen take care of software controls. And unfortunately, that's all we can say about the software. The lack of working demo units means there isn't much we can say about this device until we get finalized units in our hands. Nevertheless, it's the first Android-powered camera with interchangeable lenses, and that's an important milestone if nothing else.

More photos after the break.

 

Reader comments

Eyes-on with the Polaroid iM1836 Android-powered camera

8 Comments

Lol in the 6th picture the screen seems to be seperated from the body. I know it's a dummy unit but damn.

That's a pretty slow lens f3.0-5.6 for a 10-30mm lens (assuming a crop sensor its got a 35mm focal length of about 20-60mm). with that slow of a lens you will find focus to be slow and flash will be required very often.

Agreed. If I wanted to take average photos, I'd just stick with my smartphone.
Show me at least a micro four third sized sensor and a f1.4 10-30mm and we're talking.