Sprint

In an official press release about the new "Gold Standard" CDMA push-to-talk service coming this year, Sprint let everyone know that one of the new featured PTT phones will be an Android model.  The details are slim, only stating that it will be "an Android Smartphone with a touch screen and a QWERTY keyboard."  Further details say that the featured phones will be from Motorola and Kyocera.

While many of us have no need, PTT is still a very popular service that many people need in their jobs.  We're all glad to see Nextel and the iDEN network die a painless death, and Android seems ready to help get the CDMA version of it ready.  The full press release is after the break. [Sprint]

Sprint Unveils New Gold Standard in Push-to-Talk
Planned 4Q launch of Sprint Direct Connect will offer increased push-to-talk coverage, more broadband data capabilities, new features – and more enhancements to come as Sprint Network Vision deploys
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (BUSINESS WIRE), March 16, 2011 - Sprint (NYSE: S) today announced plans to expand its gold-standard push-to-talk leadership, unveiling fourth-quarter launch plans for next-generation push-to-talk capabilities powered by Sprint’s broadband CDMA network. As part of the launch, Sprint will offer an initial set of handsets packed with features designed for workgroups that rely on push-to-talk and establish a new push-to-talk brand – Sprint® Direct Connect®.
Sprint Direct Connect service is being built to deliver higher bandwidth capacity to keep up with customers’ demand for data. Sprint also is working to deliver enhanced applications on Sprint Direct Connect, best-ever in-building coverage and is planning to provide triple the square-mile reach of Sprint’s current push-to-talk service.
Sprint Direct Connect will launch with an initial portfolio of rugged devices from Motorola Mobility and Kyocera. The devices will feature most of the capabilities available on current Sprint push-to-talk phones, plus next-generation push-to-talk applications and functionality including high-speed data access, high-resolution cameras and Bluetooth®. The planned portfolio will include an ultra-rugged camera flip phone and an Android™ Smartphone with a touch screen and a QWERTY keyboard. In 2012, Sprint expects to deepen its push-to-talk portfolio, adding more devices with new form factors and features.
The devices are expected to enable group push-to-talk for up to 200 participants, Land Mobile Radio (LMR) interoperability, and availability notification. In early 2012, Sprint Direct Connect is expected to add more capabilities, including international push-to-talk.
Network Vision
Sprint Direct Connect service is a tangible benefit of Network Vision, Sprint’s blueprint to deploy a cost-effective and innovative network. Announced in December, Network Vision is expected to consolidate multiple network technologies into one seamless network resulting in enhanced coverage, quality and speed; better network flexibility; reduced operating costs; and improved environmental sustainability. The plan includes a complete upgrade of Sprint’s current wireless networks accompanied by changes in device chipsets and network infrastructure.
The benefits of Network Vision to Sprint’s PTT customers will be wide-ranging:
Better coverage and capacity
  • Push-to-talk coverage footprint is planned to increase to nearly 2.7 million square miles and is expected to cover a population of 309 million (with the addition of 1xrtt and roaming coverage) – an increase from the iDEN network’s 908,370 square miles covering a population 278 million.
  • In-building coverage is expected to improve significantly through investment in the most advanced CDMA technology and radio equipment.
  • Voice and data capacity is expected to increase significantly as Sprint will be able to fully leverage its industry leading spectrum holdings in 800 MHz, 1.9 GHz, and – through its partnership with Clearwire – 2.5 GHz.
With Sprint Direct Connect, Sprint expects:
  • More push-to-talk enabled devices including handsets, rugged devices, and PDAs that combine industry leading push-to-talk and mobile broadband data services over a larger coverage area.
  • Enhanced features for push-to-talk users on the new CDMA platform.
  • Interoperability with all existing Sprint push-to-talk devices.
During the nationwide implementation of Network Vision, Sprint expects to continue operating the iDEN network at current best-ever performance levels. As the customer base shifts to more broadband-centric push-to-talk applications on the CDMA network and Sprint launches Sprint Direct Connect, iDEN cell sites are expected to be phased out in 2013.
“Our customers are asking for broadband push-to-talk now,” said Paget Alves, president-Sprint Business. “We’ve seen steadily increasing demand for faster data speeds, better and broader coverage, and more applications on push-to-talk devices. Sprint Direct Connect is designed to solve for all three, and is expected to come with sub-second push-to-talk call set-up time initially in Sprint CDMA RevA coverage areas. Sub-second call set up is expected to expand across the U.S. with the implementation of Network Vision.”
Alves added, “We believe the new push-to-talk service powered by a broadband network and featuring competitively priced rugged handsets and smart phones will represent an unmatched offering in the market.”
Sprint plans to identify customers who require custom push-to-talk solutions and assist with their migration to the CDMA network. The company also plans to engage partners in developing a robust portfolio of push-to-talk accessories and involve developers in the creation of new applications through its Sprint Gets Rugged application developers program. The program will provide information, support and tools needed to port developers’ applications to Sprint Direct Connect devices. More information on the Sprint Gets Rugged application developers program can be found at http://developer.sprint.com/SprintGetsRugged. Sprint will hold a conference on March 22 at the International CTIA WIRELESS® meeting in Orlando for developers who are interested.
About Sprint Nextel
Sprint Nextel offers a comprehensive range of wireless and wireline communications services bringing the freedom of mobility to consumers, businesses and government users. Sprint Nextel served more than 49.9 million customers at the end of 2010 and is widely recognized for developing, engineering and deploying innovative technologies, including the first wireless 4G service from a national carrier in the United States; offering industry-leading mobile data services, leading prepaid brands including Virgin Mobile USA, Boost Mobile, and Assurance Wireless; instant national and international push-to-talk capabilities; and a global Tier 1 Internet backbone. Newsweek ranked Sprint No. 6 in its 2010 Green Rankings, listing it as one of the nation’s greenest companies, the highest of any telecommunications company. You can learn more and visit Sprint at www.sprint.com or www.facebook.com/sprint and www.twitter.com/sprint

 

Reader comments

Sprint's new 'Gold Standard' in push-to-talk will feature an Android QWERTY phone

12 Comments

Is there anything more annoying that listening to someone have a push to talk conversation in a public place?

Beep beep....o I don't think s...beep beep. Beep beep...Damnit, I started talking to soon and let go to...beep beep.

The push to talk is very useful at my work and we all use it all the time. I am happy they still will support it. Though I do understand what you are saying. If a person has the speaker on loud and using it to do long chats in the middle of calm public place then it can get annoying. That’s when the respect thing comes in that many don’t know about.

I didn't know anyone used push to talk anymore. I GUESS Sprint knows what they are doing, but these are the guys that choose the WiMax technology.

Just use TIKL found in the market and you can PTT any android phone, sprint your always 2 steps behind just like Palm.

I will truly miss you NEXTEL; how did the best phone company get destroyed by the worst phone company I can never understand.

It's funny when you read old articles from 2004, how Nextel was already doing 3G trials before anyone was even thinking 3G. And they where researchin a new OFDM based technology to transition their network too. (I believe OFDM is what wimax and lte are based of now.) truly ahead of their time. They where thinking 4G before other companies even began 3g.

I read that Nextel never really had a 3G-upgrade path, which is why they basically shopped themselves around for a merge partner (ie a buyer).

I use PTT for work, and have an HTC Evo for personal/business use. so i carry two devices at all times. i have excellent service using sprint's wimax (Chicago). and am have used iDen for some time. i called sprint months ago and asked if there was a PTT device coming out with wimax, the lady said she didn't know (go figure a cust. support agent didn't know anything). I am glad i will only have to carry one device in my pocket, and still be able to run a successful business, and cut my costs in half.

There are a bunch of companies that still use direct connect. Also quite a few law enforcement uses it for 1 on 1 communications with other officers to not tie up radio operations in case of emergencies. Plus construction, delivery, and transportation companies. The list goes on.