Android Central

Conducting teardowns on new devices is nothing new, we usually have the guys over at iFixit to thank for keeping our circuitry viewing habits fulfilled. However, in a slight break from the norm, Sony's engineers themselves have taken apart their latest Android tablet, the Xperia Tablet S, and consequently put it back together again. 

On the one hand, it's a piece of shameless self promotion for Sony. But, on the other hand, there's something strangely compelling about viewing the components that make up some of our favorite gadgets and gizmos. Having gone hands on with the Xperia Tablet S in Berlin at IFA, the thinness of the device is noticeably impressive. Just as impressive is the technology that has been squeezed inside, such as a different battery to the previous Tablet S, that covers more surface area but is vastly thinner. 

There are a few comparisons drawn with the Tablet S, the predecessor to this device, and the differences are noticeable, especially given that the Tablet S was released only last year. The Tegra 3 powered Xperia Tablet S is a natural progression on the Tablet S, that maintains the same folded magazine style form factor of its predecessor. The design has been updated though and progressed with the use of metal on the exterior, and improved internals within. 

Given the splash proof nature of the Xperia Tablet S too, there seems to be a healthy amount of adhesive sealant. Getting in, the engineer said, took about 20 minutes. But, putting it all back together again one wonders whether some of that water resistance may have been lost. 

For the full run down, head on over to the source link below where you'll find a step-by-step run down of each and every component within the tablet. If you're in a little more of a hurry, check out the minute long version after the break. 

Source: Sony Blog

 
There are 2 comments

DrDoppio says:

Ha, "shameless self-promotion"? Sony has no reasons to be ashamed. Every company should learn from them and do a tear-down.

davidtb says:

Sorta makes you hope someone posts a slower version that's actually useful.