Link Bubble, a unique Android browser that was sold off by developer Chris Lacy late last year, is now open source after having received a number of updates in the past few months. Moreover, the folks that acquired the browser, Brave Software, have announced that the browser will be rebranded as just "Brave," and interested parties can now sign up to test the browser's initial beta release.

On its homepage, Brave Software says that open sourcing Link Bubble is part of its focus to "fix the web." A large part of this mission revolves around the way the browser treats ads, with the focus being on preserving the privacy of the user while making sure the main revenue stream of your favorite websites isn't disrupted. From Brave:

Everyone's talking about ad blocking. Blockers can make the user experience of the Web much better. But as Marco Arment noted, they don't feel good to many folks. They feel like free-riding, or even starting a war. You may never click on an ad, but even forming an impression from a viewable ad has some small value. With enough people blocking ads, the Web's main funding model is in jeopardy.

At Brave, we're building a solution designed to avert war and give users the fair deal they deserve for coming to the Web to browse and contribute. We are building a new browser and a connected private cloud service with anonymous ads. Today we're releasing the 0.7 developer version for early adopters and testers, along with open source and our roadmap.

If you're interested in checking out Brave in more detail, you can read more on how the browser will work, and even sign up to test the initial beta release from the source link below. And if you're interested in contributing to the Brave project now that Link Bubble is open source, you can view the app's code over on Github.

Source: Brave Software