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Nest Thermostat

Nest Thermostats now available through Google Play

You can now buy a Nest Thermostat through Google Play. Price is the same as other retail outlets — $249 — and it'll ship in 1 to 2 business days, Google says. And for every thermostat sold today, Google will plant a tree. Because Earth Day. It's also available in the UK for £179. The Nest...
Nest thermostat

Nest launches in the UK today for £179

New connected thermostat for British homes now available online Soon after the Nest Learning Thermostat launched in the U.S., demand began to rise in the U.K. for the now Google-owned company to bring the rather expensive product across the Atlantic. And today Nest has officially launched in the...
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Google to acquire Nest for $3.2 billion

Nest will continue to operate with current leadership Google has announced that they will acquire Nest, makers of the popular smart thermostat and smoke alarm systems. In a post in the Investor Relations blog, Google CEO Larry Page says: Nest’s founders, Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers, have built...
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Two weeks with a Nest Thermostat

I replaced a perfectly good programmable thermostat with one ridiculously more expensive. But was it worth it? “It cost how much?” That’s not exactly an uncommon phrase in my house. Only this time, my wife wasn’t asking about some phone or tablet I brought home — and promptly placed next to...
Nest halts sales of Nest Protect smoke alarm over potential safety issue

Nest halts sales of Nest Protect smoke alarm over potential safety issue

Nest has put a halt to sales of their connected Nest Protect smoke detector over concerns that the alarm could be unintentionally deactivated. Protect smoke alarms have a "Protect Wave" feature which allows users to deactivate the alarm when it's activated under not dangerous conditions (say,...
Nest

Let Nest be Nest ... (And Motorola be Motorola, and Aviate be Aviate)

Companies get bought and sold all the time, with and without our approval (or lack of expertise). It's easy to be a skeptic. Skepticism is safe. It's a warm blanket of knowing that if shit indeed happens (and it will, from time to time), then you were right, it went bad, and you can tell...
Nest partners with Virgin Group for in-flight personal climate control

Nest partners with Virgin Group for in-flight personal climate control

Google Maps aren't the only ones playing a little early April Fool's Day shenanigans. Sir Richard Branson, Virgin founder and Tony Fadell, iPod designer and head honcho at Nest, have teamed up to deliver a not-so-believeable skit for Total Tempetature Control. Sadly, not every seat will really...
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Report suggests Nest team to become Google's core hardware unit

Tony Fadell and team to stay together and work on hardware projects at Mountain View Google and hardware seems to be a never ending news topic of late, and less than 24 hours from announcing the sale of Motorola to Lenovo talk turns back to Nest. Acquired earlier this month for $3.2 billion, the...
Nest

You can now have a Nest delivered same-day with Google Shopping Express (if you live in San Francisco)

If you live in the right area you can have your $249 thermostat delivered in a matter of hours. Just a handful of weeks after Google's acquisition of Nest was made official, Google Shopping Express will now deliver the home automation products right to your door the same day you order them. That...

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Nest Thermostat

You can now buy a Nest Thermostat through Google Play. Price is the same as other retail outlets — $249 — and it'll ship in 1 to 2 business days, Google says. And for every thermostat sold today, Google will plant a tree. Because Earth Day. It's also available in the UK for £179.

The Nest Thermostat is a "learning" device that connects to the Internet (and other Nest products). It's got a 1.75-inch display, controlled by a metal ring on the outside of the thermostat. Nest learns your temperature preferences, when you're home or away, and is aware of the outside weather, and adjusts itself accordingly. It's not a cheap device, for sure, but promises to pay for itself in savings.

Not available still is Nest Protect, which was pulled from market because of software issues with the combination smoke/carbon monoxide detector.

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Nest has put a halt to sales of their connected Nest Protect smoke detector over concerns that the alarm could be unintentionally deactivated. Protect smoke alarms have a "Protect Wave" feature which allows users to deactivate the alarm when it's activated under not dangerous conditions (say, smoke from cooking) by waving at the alarm. The Nest Wave feature has been found in Nest's own testing to be possible to be deactivated under "a unique combination of circumstances".

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Nest thermostat

New connected thermostat for British homes now available online

Soon after the Nest Learning Thermostat launched in the U.S., demand began to rise in the U.K. for the now Google-owned company to bring the rather expensive product across the Atlantic. And today Nest has officially launched in the UK and is ready for order, with prices starting at £179.

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Google Maps aren't the only ones playing a little early April Fool's Day shenanigans. Sir Richard Branson, Virgin founder and Tony Fadell, iPod designer and head honcho at Nest, have teamed up to deliver a not-so-believeable skit for Total Tempetature Control.

Sadly, not every seat will really have it's own thermostat, and we can't really select an exotic location and bask in the tropical glow.

Yet.

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Nest today updated its Android application to allow you to add up to 18 Nest Protects — those are the $129 combination smoke and CO detectors — to a single home.

Again, that's up to $2,300 worth of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in a single home. Just in case.

Also in the update: Bug fixes and enhancements.

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If you live in the right area you can have your $249 thermostat delivered in a matter of hours.

Just a handful of weeks after Google's acquisition of Nest was made official, Google Shopping Express will now deliver the home automation products right to your door the same day you order them. That is, if you live in San Francisco or San Jose. If you'll recall, Google Shopping Express is the search giant's local delivery service that lets you order a very specific set of items and have them delivered free of charge — at least for now — the same day if you live in a specific area.

Now the service is really useful for things like household goods and grocery items, but Google has also branched out to offer things like the Nexus 5 and now Nest products as well. You can pick up a Nest Thermostat for a cool $249 or a Nest Protect smoke alarm (or three, if you can afford it) for $129, and depending on when you order you'll have a nice person knocking on your door with a Shopping Express bag in no time at all.

Google Shopping Express is free at the moment, and you'll be agreeing to a six-month "free trial" in order to get the free shipping, but if you want to give it a try and live in the right place, this could be a fun way to do so if you've been eyeing a Nest. It sure as heck beats putting on pants and driving to the store.

Source: Google Shopping Express; (2)

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Matthew Panzarino, co-editor of TechCrunch joins Rene to talk about why mobile is going wearable, how contextual information and sensors are evolving, and how Apple, Google, Samsung, and everyone else will try and sell them to us.

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Regulatory filing shows deal closed on Feb. 7

Nest is now officially a Google property after the deal has been finalized. A regulatory filing submitted by Google shows that things were signed and sealed on Feb. 7. The $3.2 billion deal brings Tony Fadell and his team officially under the Google banner, where earlier reports put them at the center of Google's future hardware projects. 

It's been a busy year so far for Google what with bringing Nest on board and letting Motorola go to Lenovo. Now the paperwork is done though, we can only wonder what Google has in store. 

via re/code

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Tony Fadell and team to stay together and work on hardware projects at Mountain View

Google and hardware seems to be a never ending news topic of late, and less than 24 hours from announcing the sale of Motorola to Lenovo talk turns back to Nest. Acquired earlier this month for $3.2 billion, the questions immediately turn to; why? Well, according to a report from the folks at TechCrunch, Google has just acquired its brand new core hardware team. 

Google will keep the Nest group intact inside the company. The new division will still work on hardware devices, but not necessarily thermostats or smoke detectors. In fact, Google would like Fadell to work on gadgets that make more sense for the company.

Tony Fadell's background alone makes him a prime candidate to take charge of any hardware projects at Google. Having been on the original iPod and iPhone teams, he's certainly well equipped. What any of these future products may be will no doubt keep everyone guessing for a long time to come. For now, we can enjoy current Nest products, and know that the team that created them is in a place to do great things. 

More: Two weeks with a Nest Thermostat

Source: TechCrunch

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I replaced a perfectly good programmable thermostat with one ridiculously more expensive. But was it worth it?

“It cost how much?”

That’s not exactly an uncommon phrase in my house. Only this time, my wife wasn’t asking about some phone or tablet I brought home — and promptly placed next to all the other phones and tablets I’d previously brought home. This time it was a futuristic-looking thermostat.

On Jan. 13, Google announced that it bought Nest Labs for $3.2 billion. What’s good for Google is good for Android Central, I imagine. But not having quite that much cash on hand, we settled for buying one single, solitary Nest thermostat for the not-so-low price of $249.

Part of the selling point of Nest is that it learns your heating and cooling habits and adjusts itself accordingly to save you money. That’s a long-term play, and the idea is that Nest’s high price is recouped in a year or two.

So we can’t speak to any long-term savings just yet. But for those who are thinking about getting into the connected-home game with a Nest, we can offer up a couple weeks’ worth of experience and advice.

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Following the acquisition from Google last week, Nest has quickly become been the center of attention. Plenty of jokes have circulated about the whole deal, and many had some fears about privacy with the sale. Nest CEO Tony Fadell took some time during an interview at the DLD Conference in Munich, Germany, to discuss this, and assure everyone that at this time there are no changes.

“At this point, there are no changes. The data that we collect is all about our products and improving them. If there were ever any changes whatsoever, we would be sure to be transparent about it, number one, and number two for you to opt-in to it.”

During the interview Fadell also explained that the deal with Google was not something that happened overnight, and some of the communications have been going back and forth about it for years already. During the meetings both parties have learned a ton from each other, and Fadell said that they are basically completing each others sentences because they share a common vision. 

It is clear that privacy is something that the folks of the Nest team take very seriously, so you can rest assured that your temperature settings won't be sold to ad providers to put some extra change in their pocket. This is the start of something much larger, so let's sit back and relax, and see where Google and Nest take this.

Source: The Next Web

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One of the more polarizing stories of last week (though not necessarily for any sort of educated reason) was Google's $3.2 billion purchase of Nest Labs. That's not to say we shouldn't have a discussions about the implications of such an acquisition, but there certainly were the usual knee-jerk reactions. (Perhaps on more than one front, to be fair.) Whatever. A purchase of this size wasn't done in week. We're not going to have it all figured out in that same time span. 

But we do have to start somewhere. So we (well, me, actually) finally bought a Nest this week and started giving it the what-for. And we gave it a decent amount of time on the podcast this week. 

Have a listen to the excerpt below (after the break for you front-page browsers). One way or another, this is going to be an interesting, long-term topic. And have a listen to the full podcast here.

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This wasn't a $3.2 billion impulse purchase, by any means

Now that all the silly jokes about watching ads on your thermostat are over (they weren’t really funny to begin with), let’s have another conversation about Google’s acquisition of Nest Labs. (For another, see Phil's "Let Nest be Nest" piece from earlier this week.") 

As a quick reminder, for a cool $3.2 billion Google has bought a company that makes a smart thermostat and combo smoke and carbon monoxide detector. The CEO of Nest is non other than legendary Apple designer Tony Fadell.

I’ve been spending some time thinking about what it could mean to Google. It’s definitely intriguing, but it’s also not totally obvious to me whether this will become a brand new line of business disconnected from the Google advertising machine, or if there is some way to tie things together.

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Companies get bought and sold all the time, with and without our approval (or lack of expertise).

It's easy to be a skeptic. Skepticism is safe. It's a warm blanket of knowing that if shit indeed happens (and it will, from time to time), then you were right, it went bad, and you can tell everyone so. And if you're wrong and the world doesn't end, well, that's fine, too. Because who doesn't love a happy ending? Skepticism is a win-win for the skeptic, and a bore for the optimist.

And this quickly rang true Monday when Google announced it was buying Nest for $3.2 billion. Obvious jokes were obvious. Watch a 30-second ad before adjusting the temperature. Join Google+ to turn on your heat. Funny, but obvious. And not really helpful.

And it's almost like Google can't drop $3.2 billion without everyone becoming an expert on what it all means, hashed out in mere hours. Google bought Nest for the data. (Duh.) It bought Nest because Android@Home never got off the ground. (Again, duh.) Google bought Nest because it wants to know everything it possibly can about you. (No kidding?) And probably it bought Nest because there are ridiculously smart people working there.

So why is that a problem?

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OK Google, turn on my air conditioner

Nest co-founder Matt Rogers was on the stage at CNET's SmartHome Panel at CES last week, and he had a little bit to say about Google and how things may play out as things push to a connected home.

The timing is interesting, of course, as Google just acquired Nest and their smart controls, and we imagine they have plenty of other smart ideas lined up for Google to make happen.

Could this be the beginning of Google Now in your house? Maybe. Rogers seems to think it is, and we certainly can't argue with someone in his position. There will be privacy concerns, and there will be safety concerns, and there will be all sorts of other pitfalls. But when it all gets sorted — and it will — the connected home working with your Internet of things will probably be worth it. 

Source: CNET

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Nest will continue to operate with current leadership

Google has announced that they will acquire Nest, makers of the popular smart thermostat and smoke alarm systems. In a post in the Investor Relations blog, Google CEO Larry Page says:

Nest’s founders, Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers, have built a tremendous team that we are excited to welcome into the Google family. They’re already delivering amazing products you can buy right now--thermostats that save energy and smoke/CO alarms that can help keep your family safe. We are excited to bring great experiences to more homes in more countries and fulfill their dreams!

Nest devices are popular among tech adopters, and should be a nice addition to Google's plans to make your home (or office) smarter. 

The current leadership, under Tony Fadell, will remain and Nest will continue to be their own separate entity. Given the recognition that the brand already has, and its reputation for solid and reliable products, this is the right move in our opinion.

With this acquisition, we expect Nest's mobile applications to become more robust and integrated on both Android and iOS. We look forward to see how this all plays out.

Source: Google Investor Relations

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If you've bought yourself a fancy Nest thermostat, you'll want to go ahead and grab the latest software update for it that is currently rolling out. If you're an Android user though, Nest has gone a step further and addressed some of the concerns from owners looking to access their thermostat on the go. Previous versions of the mobile app were not compatible with tablets or even later versions of Android for that matter but a new version has been released and brings a whole slew of changes:

  • Now works with all Android devices (Android 2.2 "Froyo" or above), including tablets like Google Nexus 7 or Kindle Fire.
  • Improved speed and stability
  • Support for the 2nd gen. Nest Learning Thermostat
  • Support for System Match features (Early-On, Heat Pump Balance, True Radiant)
  • Ability to remotely lock your Nest
  • More info in Energy History
  • Nest Learning is now called Nest Sense
  • Now also available in French and Spanish
  • Overall bug fixes and improvement

If you're a Nest owner, go ahead and give it a go and let us know how it's working out for you. If you're looking to learn more about Nest and the recent updates, hit the source link below for further details.

Source: Nest

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