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6 days ago

Android Central 317: All Day I Dream About Daydream

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Audio-only stream below

Strap on a headset and dive in to this week's podcast!

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6 days ago

These are the best PlayStation VR games!

Your PlayStation VR collection should include these titles!

Sony and their partners did a great job making sure there are plenty of great games for you to play in PlayStation VR on launch day. It doesn't matter if you're into shooting, flying, music, adventure, or silly games that involve putting bacon in a blender, there really is something for everyone to enjoy.

That also means it's not entirely clear which games you should go for first, but we've been playing through all of them and have some suggestions for you! If you're starting a PlayStation VR collection, make sure these games are on your list!

Read more at VR Heads!

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6 days ago

From the Editor's Desk: Smartwatches, the zombie product category

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From the Editor's Desk

Taking a quick break from vacation to get back up to speed with the mobile world.

I've used my fair share of smartwatches over the past few years, starting with Pebbles, then picking up with Android Wear and watching Samsung figure out its wearable strategy with the each iteration of the Gear line. In that time I've also spent plenty of time with fitness bands on my wrist, which in the past year have turned into mini smartwatches in their own right. Smartwatches have evolved quite a bit, but one thing has remained the same: sales are low, and no company seems to be able to consistently ship them in considerable numbers.

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1 week ago

Android and Chill: I almost miss everything being broken

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Android is a lot better than it used to be, but those early days were really fun.

I waited in line to buy the G1 at an Alexandria, Virginia T-Mobile store. Yes, there was a line — in San Francisco and New York there were even people camping out. The phone I was buying wasn't going to replace whatever beat-to-hell BlackBerry I was using back then, I didn't even have T-Mobile service where I lived (though paying for it anyway proved to be worth it and I'll never give up this ancient plan) and the G1 wouldn't even be able to be activated in the DC area for three weeks because it wasn't a 3G market on launch day. I wanted the Google phone because I like to mess with stuff.

Fast forward eight years and all the assorted electronic crap I've gone through since and the G1 was still one of the best things I ever bought. All because of how fun it was to try and fix the broken mess that was Android back then.

Everything is better now. That means we don't have to try and fix it.

The Nexus 5X is the modern version of the G1 because it's cheap, easy to do "stuff" with, and other fun people have one. But it's not the same because Android isn't the same. Now that everything works — from the build tools to the compiler chain to the finished software — I don't spend the time I used to spend building and fiddling with it. Don't get me wrong, this is good. I've since ditched other platforms and want/need phone software that works and the last couple of Android versions have been just that, minus a few cases for a handful of people that we would see with any software. I know my phone will work when I get a call or a message or just want to challenge some crazy word that was played in Scrabble. But I find myself missing the days when it was all brokenAF and the feeling that came with hours of fooling with it and making it work. Even the latest Android beta for 7.1.1 mostly just works without building or flashing anything.

Part of the reason is how my job has changed. Six years ago Dieter Bohn and Phil Nickinson had the insight to know what was going to happen to Android and found me to come work here. Having a dude who could put Android on a toaster or make a broken build for an ADP (Android Developer Phone, the precursor to the Nexus and Pixel) work again was a smart move. My writing skills were borderline because the only things I ever wrote and got paid for writing were technical manuals for automation equipment and reading one of those is as bad as you think it would be. I think that got better (I hope it did) but my job was to pick something that was broken, figure out how to fix it or find someone who already fixed it and write about it. It was a fun and easy way to make a living.

There are plenty of other fun things to do, but I still miss fixing broken things once in a while.

What I do now has drifted away from phone stuff a little, and while it's still fun (and as easy as I can make it be) it's different. It's better most of the time because I get to look at some cool shit that I didn't get to look at before. Right now, I'm modding Skyrim because I'm writing something about the Havok engine. Next week I'm going to try Daydream View while under the influence of different substances. I have no complaints and know that this is the best job on the planet. But I still miss being a code-monkey just a little.

Android has come a long way. I see plenty of faces in the comments and in the forums that have been here long enough to know what I'm talking about and were along for the ride helping fix things and break new stuff. I think all of us know that things are much better the way they are now, but we also miss having to prod and coax things into submission every now and then. At least a little bit.

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1 week ago

Why Android malware scares are almost never as bad as they seem

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Security

Headlines shout about hundreds of millions being vulnerable. But they ignore a vital part of Android's security which stops app-based malware dead in its tracks.

Whether it's QuadRooter earlier in 2016, or Gooligan more recently, the news is full of reports of terrifying Android security vulnerabilities. Often they're brought to light by security companies with a product to sell, and blown out of all proportion by the mainstream press.

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1 week ago

Twist crams most of the world into a single charging adapter

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An all-in-one travel charger for your mobile tech.

Travelling to another country and realizing that single travel charger you brought isn't nearly enough for your phone and watch and tablet may be the ultimate First World Problem to some, but the truth is travelling with multiple international chargers quickly fills your travel bag. UK chargers are much larger than US chargers, for example, and the adapters don't help a ton.

Twist is an interesting new solution that is especially useful for anyone who travels between multiple power systems, but it's also not bad if all you want is a good 4-port USB charger.

The concept is fairly simple. You have a big white barrel capable of outputting 20W/4A across 4 USB ports, with a twisting mechanism in the center that allows you to switch between US, Europe, and UK charging pins. You can also tweak the US charging pins so they match the Australian format.

The only thing stopping me from using this every day is how big it is compared to a traditional US charging adapter, but it's absolutely earned a spot in my travel bag due to how light and simple it is.

For $40 on Amazon, you're getting what you pay for. This is a little more expensive than some of the manual 2-port adapters, which is to be expected. It's unlikely to be something you use every day, but as someone who travels with a lot of USB tech this is a welcomed way to save space in my bag.

See on Amazon

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1 week ago

Why the $49 Amazon Fire tablet is a great buy this holiday

In the past we've steered people clear of really cheap Android tablets at holiday time. Not this year.

The Amazon Fire Tablet is both really cheap and Android, though perhaps not the Android you're used to. There's no Google to be found, which means no Play Store or Google Apps of any kind.

But if you go for the 7-inch Fire you're only going to be asked to part with $49 of your hard-earned cash. Or as is often the way, even less than that, thanks to frequent sales like Black Friday just gone. I've been using one for some time and people keep asking me if it's worth buying?

The answer is yes.

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1 week ago

Google On app gets revamped ahead of Google Wifi release

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New UI update, name change coincides with release of Google Wifi.

Google is preparing for the imminent release of its new router — Google Wifi — by updating the Google On app that was released alongside the OnHub routers manufactured in partnerships with T-Link and ASUS. Say goodbye to Google On, and hello to its shiny new successor, Google Wifi, as obtained by Android Police.

Photo credit: Android Police

One of the biggest changes to the app UI is the inclusion of three tabs at the top, which should make things smoother for navigating around to access the app's different functions. Whether you want to review which devices are connected to your network, prioritize a specific device for faster speeds when streaming high-quality video, or set up a guest Wi-Fi network, it's all the easier within the new app.

The Google Wifi app also adds support for the new Family Wi-Fi Pause feature, which allows you to temporarily disable internet access on certain devices to make time for genuine family time without the distractions of screens. It's a great feature for parents struggling to limit their kids tech time around the dinner time or at bedtime.

The update is still rolling out through the Google Play Store, but if you're eager to see the changes for yourself you can download the APK from APK Mirror and go from there.

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1 week ago

These are the best free apps for PlayStation VR

There aren't many out there, but the free apps on Playstation VR are nothing to scoff at.

Sony launched PlayStation VR with a bang, including a ton of amazing games from nearly every genre. If you haven't spent any time lurking through the PlayStation store since setting up your PlayStation VR, then you might not realize that there are a handful of free apps available for download right now. At the moment, the pickings are a bit slim, but that's to be expected since we're only a few short days past launch day. Well, don't worry about searching through the PlayStation store because we've got the details on the best free apps on PlayStation VR.

Read more at VR Heads

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1 week ago

Telltale announces Guardians of the Galaxy series for 2017

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Guardians of the Galaxy the latest franchise to get the Telltale treatment.

2017 is shaping up to be a banner year for fans of Star-Lord, Rocket and the rest of the Guardians of the Galaxy. Telltale has announced Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series, a five-part episodic series of games to be released on Android, as well as PC, console, and iOS in early 2017. Check out the preview trailer:

As with previous Telltale series, episodes will be released periodically and bought individually or all together with a season pass. Previous franchises that Telltale has tackled include Batman, Minecraft, The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones. This is their first attempt at developing a game for a Marvel property.

Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy was a surprise late-summer hit in 2015, with a sequel due to hit screens next spring. While nothing is currently know about the story or the release schedule for the Telltale episodes, logically it would make sense to expect the first episode to launch in early 2017, to build hype leading up to the film's release in early May.

Android Gaming

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1 week ago

For less than $100, you can start taking 360-degree photos with LG 360 CAM

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If you're interested in giving 360-degree photography a go, this deal on the LG 360 CAM will let you get started for just under $100.

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1 week ago

First look: Android 7.0 Nougat on OnePlus 3 + 3T

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OnePlus 3 Nougat

Android 7.0 + OxygenOS 4.0 update adds software tweaks from the OnePlus 3T, along with small visual refresh and new Nougat features.

OnePlus recently released its first Android 7.0 beta build for the OnePlus 3, bringing the phone up to the latest (stable) version of the Android, while also including features from OxygenOS 3.5 on the OnePlus 3T. Because the OnePlus 3 and 3T are set to remain on the same software track going forwards, the experience on the OnePlus 3T should be the same when the update arrives for both phones later this month.

So what's new? If you've already been using OxygenOS 3.5 — either in community build form on the 3, or as a stable build on the 3T, many features will already be familiar. (For example, the redesigned home screen launcher and updated widget shelf.)

But there are also plenty of other changes, both big and small.

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1 week ago

USB-C is changing the world for the better, but it's still not safe enough

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There's still a lot to do in order to ensure USB-C is safe for everyone.

For the most part, techy folks seem to have figured out USB-C. They mostly know you can't just order the cheapest thing on sale at Amazon, are reasonably aware of the dangers associated with using bad cables, and there are consumer advocates out there pushing every day for better cables and more awareness. The beginnings of a safe ecosystem of cables is something that could potentially happen with this level of awareness, and that's great. It sucks that we have collectively suffered through over a year of accidentally damaged hardware through potentially life-threatening cables — even one made by Apple — to get there, but forward momentum is always a good thing.

So what happens next? With Lenovo's Moto Z, Google's Pixel, and Apple's MacBooks being scooped up all around the world right now there are orders of magnitude more people using USB-C cables every week. That means people who aren't the knowledgeable techy few are browsing Amazon for spare or replacement cables, which requires some real solutions very soon.

The road so far

Most people don't fully understand why USB-C is so dangerous compared to the previous iterations of phone and tablet charging cables, and it's not hard to guess why. Micro-USB cables can be purchased in bulk for basically nothing, and users are conditioned to "just throw it out and grab a new one" when a cable doesn't behave. Take a look at any technical support guide for connecting something to your PC via USB and close to the top of every troubleshooting list is something about trying another cable. We've been conditioned to accept that sometimes bad cables happen in a batch, so you just grab another one.

It's not just bad cables, some of the companies making our phones aren't playing by the rules either.

USB-C is capable of transmitting significantly more data and several times more power than your average Micro-USB or Lightning cable, and that's where we run into problems. A shoddy USB-C cable can destroy equipment in an instant, because they're designed to be a lot more complicated. These are supposed to be cables with tiny computers inside to help regulate things like power and data transfer, but in the early days several manufacturers were caught taking their regular Micro-USB cable design and just swapping the tip out for that new oval port design. With nothing to tell the brick plugged in to your wall how much power to send, everything can go wrong.

It's not just bad cables; some of the companies making our phones aren't playing by the rules, either. USB-C has its own form of rapid charging capabilities, which makes it possible to boost laptops and phones quickly. Proprietary charging methods, like Qualcomm's Quick Charge system, aren't compatible with the USB-C spec that exists right now. That hasn't stopped Qualcomm or their phone making partners from doing their own thing in order to make USB-C and Quick Charge both happen on the same phone, which has the potential to cause very serious problems for users buying those bargain cables online. Instead of following the guidelines for USB-C, these third parties would rather boast a feature that isn't actually better than what you already get with USB-C rapid charging. This should change with the next version of the spec, but many people will be left in the lurch.

We have several manufacturers now who have either developed a reputation for quality cables or corrected their cables after being called out for not meeting spec, and that's great. Unfortunately, virtually none of these companies are testing every cable they manufacture, so the potential for a flawed product to reach a user is higher than it should be. In most of these cases, the worst that could happen is that the phone doesn't charge or send data as quickly as it could. In more extreme cases, phones and laptops could be in very real danger of permanent damage.

What should happen next?

There are several ways USB-C could move forward to become something safe for everyone to use, but it's going to require some changes on behalf of cable manufacturers and users alike. Since asking users to consult their closest electrical engineer to ensure a cable they found in the clearance bin at Wal-Mart isn't a viable option, most of what happens first is going to be on the cable manufacturers or the people that allow them to sell. It's not safe for manufacturers to deliver USB-C cables the same way Micro-USB cables have been sold over the last 10 years. It's important, too, for consumers to know that each cable is as capable as the last, that it can power your laptop and quickly move 4K video from your phone. These cables are doing more than any single cable like it has done before, and with that extra work comes the need for extra care in their manufacturing.

A lot of this comes down to testing at the factory level, and until recently there wasn't a great way to do that at scale. Recently, I spoke with Gil Ben-Dov, CEO of Total Phase, whose Advanced Cable Tester is designed to address a lot of the per-cable concerns consumers are faced with today. The testing unit is designed to test for continuity, shorts, E-Marker accuracy, signal integrity, with results achieved in less than 15 seconds. This kind of testing unit gives manufacturers the ability to rapidly ensure entire batches of cables are safe and functional in ways most cables aren't ever tested before being shipped out to consumers.

Gil had some other ideas for how consumers might move forward. One possible way to address this is through certification, some kind of governing body willing to say "these cables are the ones to buy" after a set of guidelines have been met by the manufacturer. Those guidelines would need to be more rigid than what currently exists from UL, but the same basic idea could apply. A branding or sticker that let consumers know these are worthy, all-purpose USB-C cables that work in every environment.

The safety branding also needs to be enforced by retailers, which is a problem that has led to several serious issues over the last couple of years. It can't be enough for a company to show Amazon a picture of the UL logo stamped on a battery casing, because it turns out there's no magic involved in creating those markings. Any shady company can claim certification for their product and sell a quick batch of something for what appears to be next to nothing and make a profit. Retailers need to know they are selling cables that work as well.

And so, we wait...

If every part of this process is focused on delivering something that is safe for consumers, it's possible a standard format could emerge quickly that becomes the default way USB-C is handled for the future. This isn't just good for consumers, according to Gil Ben-Dov: manufacturers are eager for a solution that decreases return requests. Many cable manufacturers are looking for a way to step away from the potential brand damage associated with having USB-C cables fail spectacularly, and a certification that claims their hardware is safe can give early adopters an important bump in a crowded market.

It wasn't all that long ago I referred to USB-C as the Wild West, and in a lot of ways it could still be seen that way. The potential for harm to your hardware isn't likely to ever be completely removed, but there are tools in place that didn't exist even six months ago to help make this the stable ecosystem it probably should have been before these ports were put in things and sold to everyone.

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1 week ago

Best Kid-proof Cases for Amazon Fire Tablets

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Best Kid-proof Cases for Amazon Fire Tablets

What's the best Amazon Fire case for kids? The one that keeps it in one piece!

Tablets are basically half glass, and the Amazon Fire is our top pick for kids. But you'll still want to protect it properly so that the little ones can use it to their heart's content without constantly worrying about them destroying it.

Here are some of the best kid-proof cases for your Amazon Fire tablet.

Fintie Casebot Honey Comb Series

Fintie Casebot Honey Comb

Bouncy, durable, flexible silicone is totally the way to go if you have kids who can't wait to get their sticky mitts all over your Amazon Fire.

The honeycomb design helps to disperse the force of impact, so that your Fire stays in one piece when dropped from a short height. It wraps around the front of your tablet to protect the bezel and create a bumper between your screen and whatever your kid happens to lay it down on.

Comes in 10 colors and only fits the 2015 7-inch Fire.

See at Amazon


Topsky heavy duty case

Topsky

These Topsky cases are made of polycarbonate and flexible silicone, so that they're easy for your child to hold and durable enough to withstand playtime, even if playtime means playing with your Fire tablet instead of on it.

The kickstand is perfect to help you set up your tablet for the little ones when they want to watch cartoons or play games.

Comes in seven colors and fits the 7-inch Fire tablet (2015).

See at Amazon


Avawo convertible handle stand

Avawo

Tablets can be awkward for the kidlets to hold onto without dropping, so having a case with a handle made for little hands is perfect.

The handle folds into a convenient stand, and the case is thick and made with heavy duty EVA foam, which protects your Fire tablet from drops and the odd toss.

Comes in purple, green, red, or black and fits the 2015 (5th generation) Fire tablet only.

See at Amazon


Tinkle One EVA case

Tinkle One

EVA foam is where it's at for shock-proof cases that help kid-proof your Amazon Fire tablet. It's wipeable with a damp cloth and durable enough to survive short drops.

That being said, drops shouldn't be common, since the case is designed with little hands in mind, and it comes in six fun colors (well, five and black) to appease even the most discerning of toddlers.

Fits the 7-inch Amazon Fire tablet (2015).

See at Amazon


EpicGadget hybrid case

EpicGadget

EpicGadget's hybrid case is shock-proof and provides great drop protection, thanks to its flexible silicone and hard polycarbonate makeup.

The vertical kickstand lets you stand your Amazon Fire tablet upright or horizontally, so your young'uns can watch cartoons or play games hands-free.

The color combinations are fun and bright, and you can count on the silicone to be grippy and easy to clean.

Fits the 7-inch Amazon Fire tablet.

See at Amazon


Amazon FreeTime

Amazon FreeTime

Amazon's own FreeTime case is totally designed with kids in mind, with a shape meant for little hands, reinforced corners for extra drop protection, fun colors, and made from a material that's kid-safe and easy to clean.

All the buttons and ports are easily accessible for adults and children alike, and raised bumps on the inside help to further disperse impact.

Fits the 7-inch Amazon Fire tablet (2015).

See at Amazon


What's on your Fire?

Do you have an awesome go-to case to make sure your kids don't destroy your Amazon Fire tablet? Let us know in the comments below!

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1 week ago

Just get a new MacBook Pro? Now is the perfect time to move to Android

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USB-C is the port all of our new electronics will be using, except for the iPhone. Android is ready to hook up with your sexy new MacBook Pro.

Apple's new MacBook Pro was met with the same controversy that many new products garner. You can't please everyone, and there will always be a change or an omission that gets some folks riled up. We all do it, all the time, and this time was no exception. We're not pointing any fingers.

Ignoring all the hubbub for a moment, the new MacBook Pro is probably a great computer for any professional on the go who doesn't need extreme 32-bit single-precision floating point format performance, which requires a very expensive and power hungry graphics system. And since most of us don't have a Quadro P6000 in the computer on our desks at work, this means us. (And if you have a Quadro P6000 installed inside your desktop computer, I am so jealous.) It also looks great for folks who just want a high-end laptop to work on Excel sheets or look at Facebook and want to use macOS instead of Windows or Chrome. Rene has a really well-written and rational review at iMore that you should read if you haven't.

More: MacBook Pro (2016) review

One of the most common complaints you'll hear about the new MacBook is that folks are upset that they need so many dongles. With no SD card slot and USB-C ports, all the things you already have can't plug in without some sort of adapter. Including your iPhone. We can't fix every issue, but we know how to alleviate the problem of having one piece of gear with a standard, albeit new, port and the other having a proprietary port that's not going away anytime soon. Make the switch to Android!

The problem isn't with the MacBook Pro. Like the "regular" MacBook, it uses a standard USB Type-C port with USB 3.1 compliance and is specified for USB-PD (Power Delivery). You need to get used to that because that's where everything is going to be very shortly. And that's good. It's a better bus and interface that most things can benefit from when they use it. Even Apple, if they used it on the iPhone and iPad.

They would be able to transmit all the data they want to transfer through the external bus and would benefit from the engineering other companies have done on an open standard. But too much money has been sunk into the Lightning port already, and moving would cause a user revolt of epic proportions. You will need to use a special cable approved by Apple or a dongle of some sort to connect your iPhone to your MacBook Pro, and shortly the same thing will be said about every computer.

What to look for when buying a USB-C cable

The same can be said for Android phones. Last year when Microsoft, Google, OnePlus and others used a USB-C port on their phones it took courage was early in the life of the standard and the ports on the Nexus 6P or Lumia 950 or OnePlus 3 didn't support things like USB 3.1 speeds or Power Delivery, but since they used a recognized standard everything you buy today is 100% backwards compatible.

They were looking forward, and we complained about having to buy new cables the same way MacBook Pro buyers are complaining about dongles. But that's mostly done with, and USB-C to USB-C is simple and better than what we had before. Every "flagship" Android phone released from now until we get something "even better" will have a USB-C port with a bus specified for PD. Just like the MacBook Pro.

If you like the iPhone, but hate the dongles and having two expensive things that can't use the same stuff like a keyboard or webcam, know that phones like the Pixel and LG V20 are here for you. 2017's great Android phones will be, too.

And so will we.

Google Pixel + Pixel XL

Google Store Verizon

img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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