4 years ago

Michael Dell: Android will surpass iPad as tablet king



Android will become the king of the tablet market, stripping the coveted title from Apple's iPad, according to Dell founder and CEO Michael Dell. The claim appears in an interview in today's Wall Street Journal, in which Dell traces the meteoric rise of Android over the past 18 months and predicts that the platform's entrance into the tablet market will achieve similar success. Though Dell can't be considered completely objective (See: Dell Streak and Dell Streak 7) it is reassuring to see some confidence from the CEO of one of the largest computer manufacturers in the world.

Dell says that he doesn't see the shift in dominance coming anytime in the near future, citing huge reported profits from Apple and less-than-stellar sales of the much touted Motorola Xoom. And despite rumors of upcoming Windows 7-powered Dell tablets, Dell has repeatedly made it clear that his company is committed to Android. “I think you'll see... enormous numbers of Android tablets with Dell certainly playing a role in that as well.”  [The Wall Street Journal]

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4 years ago

Photoshop fail: Honeycomb on the PlayBook


It's happened to the best of us: you're up too late at the White Castle with your friends, when you remember you've got some mad homework due the next day. You rush home, heart pounding, and hop on the computer. After a hurried five minutes on Photoshop, you glance at your masterpiece, and pleased, go to bed.

I can only assume that's what took place with this latest gaffe, as I'm not sure there's any plans to have Honeycomb booting on the PlayBook anytime soon. Maybe the graphic artists at MacMall heard about the PlayBook running Android apps and assumed that was the only way?

We may never know. Thanks, John!

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4 years ago

ASUS EeePad Transformer sneaks onto military Exchange Online Store a tad early


Read our full ASUS EeePad Transformer review

Military Exchange Online

Here's the deal regarding online availability of the ASUS EeePad Transformer: Like we told you last week, it'll be available starting tomorrow at a handful of online retailers. (See the full list here.) And when we say "tomorrow," we definitely mean April 26, and ASUS confirmed as much, saying the product pages shouldn't be live before then. A quick reminder on official pricing: $399 for the 16GB version, $499 for the 32GB version, and another $149 for the keyboard dock.

Oh, but that picture you see above? That's from the military Exchange Online Store, which apparently already has the Transformer up for grabs as Android Central reader Danon points out. So if you have access to AAFES and have a hankering for that 10.1-inch Transformer and can't wait a few more hours, get to ordering. That's an order. (See what we did there?) A couple more pics are after the break. [AAFES] Thanks, Danon!

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4 years ago

SugarSync unveils latest update, frees you from wires (and thinking)


Users of the popular SugarSync Android app should be on the lookout for a new update that introduces all sorts of automated cloud-syncing options.

They call it AutoSync, and in a nutshell, this is what it does for you:

  • Free your mobile photos – Liberate all those great mobile photos you’ve taken from your device, without ever having to think about it. AutoSync automatically backs them up and syncs them to your computer at pre-set intervals.
  • Make your device more productive – No more emailing files to yourself to ensure you have the right version. Be productive from your device, and rest assured that the latest version will be automatically saved to the cloud and to your computers.
  • Keep your mobile photos/memories safe – Even in the case of a lost device, you can be sure that your photos and memories are safe. AutoSync has been backing them up and syncing them in the background.
  • Say goodbye to the hassle of wires and cables – Many users resist syncing and downloading photos and folders from their mobile devices simply because it is too complex and time consuming. Put the wires away, and let AutoSync take care of the rest.

Download link and full presser are after the break.

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4 years ago

Android Quick App: Systerac Memory Cleaner


We like easy around here.  Too much of what we do every day is far from easy, so when something comes along that does what it's supposed to do without a lot of futzing around, we're gonna share it with you guys.  Systerac Memory Cleaner fits the bill nicely.  What it does -- and all it does -- is clean up the cache from things like the browser with a single click.  That means it's a great way to free up some space on your phone when and if you need to.

The free version only cleans browser and search cache, and oddly enough that's what I like about it the most.  No settings to fool with and you can zap that browser cache away with a click.  The browser on Android, or any other mobile device (or even your computer) stores a lot of data that you may never need again.  That data can build up, and we all know there are times when we'd rather have 10 or 20 MB of space back instead of having application cache eating it up.  Systerac Memory Cleaner can clear it all out for you, no root needed, no digging in app settings.  The app is 84k in size, and can be moved to the SD card.  Sounds like a very fair trade.

Some of us might want something with a few more settings instead of just a simple click and clean.  The Pro (read paid) version cleans up just about everything that can be safely cleaned -- and again without needing root permissions.  Market cache, cache from any app, Maps, call logs, it does it all, and includes a simple widget for one click access.  Of course there are other apps out there that do the same thing, but the paid version is only €0.50, or about $0.72 US -- we like saving money almost as much as easy.  It works with any Android device running 1.6 or higher, and doesn't have any screwey permissions.  Give it a look -- the link to the free version and a couple screen shots are after the break.

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4 years ago

Yes, the ASUS EeePad Transformer has GPS in the United States


Read our complete ASUS EeePad Transformer Review

ASUS EeePad Transformer GPS

Dunno how or why these rumors get started, but let's squash 'em right now. Yes, the U.S. version of the ASUS EeePad Transformer -- which goes on sale here in the states tomorrow -- has GPS. We've used it. It works. And we went so far as to mention in our full review a week ago. And in the specs list.

Repeat: The ASUS EeePad Transformer has GPS. And it works just fine. Carry on.

Update: We've removed ASUS' official statement because it was causing more confusion. here's the deal:

  • GPS works with Wifi on.
  • GPS works with Wifi off.
  • GPS works after a reboot and Wifi still off.

Any other questions?

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4 years ago

Allow app installs from 'unknown sources'


There comes a time in every Android user's life where you want to install an app not found in the Android Market. If it's your first time, you're greeted with, "For security, your phone is set to block installation of applications not obtained from the Android Market" message as you try to install.

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4 years ago

Politico app hits Android, mobile news users cheer


If there's one thing us Android users are pegged to love, it's choice. If you fit that mold (and be real, who doesn't?), and you love to consume news from your mobile device, you'll be pleased to know Politico has unleashed their mobile app to the masses.

The app itself is pretty fast, once it's loaded. I sat on the initial loading screen for a good 15 to 20 seconds as everything was loaded up. But once you're past that, you're greeted with an attractive interface and absolutely no lag whatsoever when selecting a story to read.

The app is also free (in price) and free of ads, so it's definitely worth picking up if you're a reader of Politico. And if you prefer your news from somewhere else, there's always CNN, USA Today, MSNBC, NPR, New York Times and Fox News.

Download link's after the break. [from the Android Central Application Forums]

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4 years ago

Another Galaxy S II commercial from Samsung appears, this time touting thinness


galaxy s II

Samsung has been on a tear recently with its commercials for the upcoming Galaxy S II and now another one has hit YouTube. This one focuses on the thinness of the device, particularly that its small enough to fit under a door. It is pretty impressive that Samsung has been able to include the high end specs inside a device that is 8.49mm thick. 

Enough talking though, see it for yourself after the break! [YouTube]

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4 years ago

Nook Color updated to Version 1.2, gets Froyo, apps, e-mail and more


Nook Color update

Barnes & Noble's uber-popular Nook Color e-reader (which also doubles as a better-than-average Android tablet) is getting its official upgrade to version 1.2.0 this week. It's pushing out over the air, or you can install it manually. Here's what's new:

  • Access to shop a broad collection of popular NOOK Apps™ to enjoy great games, stay up to date on news and weather, and more
  • Full-featured free email to check and send web-based email (i.e., Yahoo, Gmail, Hotmail, AOL) all from one in-box
  • NOOK Color’s update to Android OS 2.2/Froyo offers system improvements, browser performance and a more complete Web experience giving customers access to enjoy even more video, interactive and animated content. NOOK Color now includes support for Adobe® Flash® Player
  • NOOK Kids™ exciting new Read and Play titles that bring animation, activities and stories together
  • NOOK Books Enhanced offer in-page video and audio in a growing number of titles
  • Enhancements to magazine navigation making it easier to enjoy even more of the growing selection of magazines in NOOK Newsstand
  • NOOK Friends™ (beta) to see your friends’ reading activities, swap books with LendMe™, share recommendations and discover new titles

So the big things here? Froyo, of course, and apps. But don't mistake this update for bringing Android Market access. You'll be downloading apps from Barnes & Noble. Market access is still going to require some hackery, which we're more than happy to show you in the Android Central Forums.

So look for the update to push out this week. Or if you want to install it manually (we just did), instructions are after the break. [Barnes & Noble] Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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4 years ago

Lenovo said to be bringing Honeycomb tablet with keyboard dock, pen input


Lenovo Thinkpad

Anybody have a hankering for another Android 3.0 tablet/laptop combo? The ASUS EeePad Transformer (read our full review) is already out in Europe and is headed to the United States this week. And hot on its heels this summer may be the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet.

Lenovo ThinkPad TabletLooking at the listed specs, it's pretty similar to the Transformer. It's got a 10.1-inch IPS display, Android 3.0 Honeycomb powered by an NVIDIA Tegra 2 processor, USB ports, SD card reader, microUSB, HDMI, Wifi and 3G versions, and "keyboard booklet and cradle." Same as the Transformer. And like ASUS' set, the ThinkPad Tablet will come in 16GB and 32GB  versions -- and add on a 64GB versions for the serious PowerPoint players. It's also touting some serious enterprise-friendly Cisco security software, which the new Samsung devices will be sporting as well. But, wait, there's more. The ThinkPad Tablet also will have a pen input a la the HTC Flyer.

We're going to withhold judgment on the keyboard dock until it's official and we get to see it. But if leaked images are any indication, it looks seriously clunky compared to the EeePad Transformer. We'll just have to see. Check out more pics and deets at the source link. [This is My Next]


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4 years ago

The HTC Hero (GSM) needs your hackery help


GSM Hero

The GSM version of the HTC Hero is in need of a CyanogenMod maintainer, so it has been dropped by the CM team.  Ciwrl sends word that while they have tried to keep the Hero on the supported device list, some memory eating bugs have cropped up and without someone to keep things up to date, they had no choice but to discontinue support for the GSM Hero.

Like its Sprint cousin, the Hero is still a pretty capable device and has probably the best profile of any phone -- Android or otherwise -- with that awesome chin.  We just can't let it die without a fight.  If anyone out there has the time and skills to commit to this one, contact a member of the CM team. [CyanogenMod Forum via @gu1dry]

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4 years ago

CyanogenMod 7.0.2 brings host of bugfixes, support for OG Droid


CyanogenModA quick heads up for all you CyanogenMod users -- CM7.0.1 CM 7.0.2 stable was just released, and it brings along a slew of bugfixes identified since CM7.0 hit. Here's the official word:

It’s been about two weeks since we rolled out the first stable version of CyanogenMod-7, and it unfortunately came with a few bugs. 7.0.1 brings many bugfixes, including GPS fixes for many devices, a handful a new features, and support for a few devices that weren’t quite ready in time for 7.0 (original Droid).

Hey, bugs happen. Nice to see 'em squashed quickly. Head on into ROM Manager or the CM forums and get your download on. [CyanogenMod]

Update: And CM7.0.1 was pulled and replaced by CM7.0.2, which fixes bugs in CM7.0.1. Follow that?

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4 years ago

Editorial: If you want to know where I've been, all you have to do is ask


Location Cache

Much hay has been made of late over your phone caching (aka "storing") your location data. It started with the realization that the iPhone was storing location data ... and storing, and storing. (And also syncing the data to the computer via iTunes.) The problem is that the data wasn't overwritten over time, so you've got a general look at where someone's been over the life of the phone.

Headlines ensued.

Location cacheAndroid does the same sort of thing, boys and girls. And it's supposed to. But it does it right. Instead of saving days and weeks and months of location data, it saves the 50 most recent cellular GPS locations, and 200 most recent Wifi fixes. And it's stored in a little file on your phone.

"But, Phil!" you cry. "That's a big security concern!" Well, yes. And, no.

First off: All those location-based services you like to use -- Google Maps, local search results, Foursquare, Gowalla, Twitter, photo geotagging, etc. -- they all use caching to speed up the process of figuring out where you are. That's what caching is, after all. Saving data (in a "cache") so that it doesn't have to be loaded from scratch each time. The browser you're reading this on likely does it, and it makes things that much easier. Same thing for smartphones.

"But, Phil!" you cry. "All of that information is cached on my phone, where anyone can get to it!" Well, sure. But, first and foremost, you need root access ("you" being an app or someone trying to get at the data). There's a handy little app called Location Cache on the Android Market that will show you just where you've been. Or, more accurately, where your phone has pinged. (I haven't actually been in Washington, D.C., in about 8 years, but my phone's pinged some Wifi access point there, somehow.) The app also gives you the option to wipe the cached location data and block further data.

But in long list of things that are on my phone that I don't want to fall into evil hands, my 50 most recent cellular pings aren't all that high. Nor are the 200 most recent Wifi locations I've pinged one way or another. Contacts and e-mail, photos, well, that's another story.

But our level of concern really comes down to this: How would someone gain access to the information? The most likely route is directly. Your phone is lost or stolen and falls into nefarious hands. Sure, it's possible you could download an evil-doing application. You might have heard about a few in the news lately. But in spite the occasional headline, data-stealing apps aren't all that prevalent. We know. We download a lot of apps around here. And your phone needs to be rooted for anyone -- or any app -- to have access to the location cache in the first place.

So what can you do? What should you do?

First thing we'd recommend is installing a security app that can locate your phone should it be lost or stolen -- and wipe it (erase all the data) if you can't recover it. There are a bunch of good security apps out there. Google 'em and take a look. It's worth taking a look at, location caching or no location caching.

Location CacheAlternatively, you can shut off Android's location services and stop further caching of location data. It's in Settings>Location & Security. (The name might be slightly different depending on your phone, but we're not surprised Google associated one with the other on stock Android.)

And you might not have noticed this unless you're the type who flashes devices from scratch on a daily or weekly basis, but one of the first things Android does is ask whether you want to use the location services. It is not caching your location information without your permission, even if you never noticed it on setup.

Let's recap: The sky's not falling. Android isn't storing your location information -- and remember this is general location information and not necessarily exactly where you've been -- without your permission. And it's pretty unlikely that your cached data will fall into evil hands. And even if it does, there are ways to protect yourself.

Tonight, we'll sleep just fine.

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