Headlines

2 years ago

Sprint Epic 4G Touch EL29 update rolling out now

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Sprint today is rolling out the EL29 update for the Epic 4G Touch (aka the Samsung Galaxy S II). This is the update we first told you about a week ago when the source code dropped. And today, the update has begun to push out to devices. Here's the official changelog:

  • Security update
  • Dismissing multiple calendar alerts
  • Commercial Alert System (CMAS) activated

The Epic 4G Touch update -- officially to software version S:D710.0.5S.EL29, if you're into that sort of thing -- will be released in stages, Sprint says, with all devices scheduled to receive it within the next 10 days or so.

We're also expecting the Carrier IQ software to have been stripped from this update, and that may be included in the "Security update" bullet point. (But why not just come out and say it?) Sprint previously announced that it has quit using Carrier IQ for analytics data after a couple of months of user outrage, and we've already seen Sprint remove the softare from its HTC ROMs.

To get the update for your Epic 4G Touch, just look for the notification in the aptly named notification bar, then send things on their way. Or if you've told it to install later, head to menu>settings>about phone>system updates>update Android to get things going.

Source: Sprint; More: Epic 4G Touch forums

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2 years ago

Samsung cracks open Galaxy Note, reveals tabletphone components within

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Usually we have to wait for some brave individual to take screwdrivers, spudgers and the like to a device before we get to see what's lurking inside. This time, however, Samsung's saved you the trouble of voiding your warranty and being left with a heap of broken circuitry, with an official teardown of the Galaxy Note, its unique phone/tablet hybrid.

If you've never looked inside one of these things before, it's always amazing how so much "stuff" is packed within a (relatively) small device. In the case of the Galaxy Note, the S-Pen stylus integration requires a special digitizer to detect the pen's presence and the amount of pressure, as well as a WACOM chip to process pen input.

Hit the source link for a more detailed breakdown of what's inside the Galaxy Note, or check out our full review for more on the device itself.

Source: Samsung Tomorrow

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2 years ago

Apple lawsuit is not targeting Galaxy Nexus unlock screen

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The Korea Herald today is reporting that the unlocking mechanism on the Samsung Galaxy Nexus is not the subject of a new legal complaint filed by Apple.

The Galaxy Nexus was first named as a target on Jan. 20 on Florian Mueller's FOSS Patents blog. But an unnamed Samsung official tells the Korea Herald that Google's first Android 4.0 device isn't on the list of supposedly infringing devices provided by Apple.

“We’re aware that there was a hearing involving Apple’s slide-to-unlock feature after our patent infringement case last Friday and a series of products in the Galaxy lineup were accused there, but what we’ve discovered is that the Galaxy Nexus wasn’t one of them,” the company official said.

The unlocking mechanism on the Samsung Galaxy Nexus -- what's in the unadultered Android 4.0 code, actually, and is not a feature specific to Samsung devices -- at the very least looks and feels different than the slide-to-unlock bar on iOS. In Ice Cream Sandwich, you have a ring that you pull to the left to launch the camera application, or right to unlock the phone. Apple's iOS has a button that you slide to unlock the device. (See our picture above if you've somehow never seen the iOS unlock screen before.)

Samsung has been the target of lawsuits from Apple for months now, with the Galaxy Tab 10.1 having been hit with a German injunction over its design (Samsung released a tweaked version recently to skirt the injunction) and is continuing to fight claims in the Netherlands. The process continues to slog on, and with Apple having just posted some ridiculous incredible earnings figures, we'd expect it to look to extend itself over any and all competition.

Source: Korea Herald; thanks, Chaz!

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2 years ago

LG boasts 1 million Optimus LTE phones sold worldwide

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LG says it's sold more than one million Optimus LTE smartphones worldwide since the device's launch late last year. The Optimus LTE made its international debut in LG's native South Korea last October, before moving to Japan and North America in December. On AT&T it's the Nitro HD, on Verizon it's the Spectrum, and Canadians will recognize it as the Bell Optimus Eye. The names may be different, but all these devices are built around similar hardware -- a 1.5GHz dual-core CPU, 1GB of RAM, a 720p IPS display and that all-important 4G LTE radio.

Cherry-picking some impressive sales figures, LG says that Korean sales of the Optimus LTE hit 600,000 units in the first three months of availability, while Japanese buyers snapped up 8,500 units on launch day alone. There are no U.S.-specific numbers included in today's announcement, but that shouldn't surprise anyone given that the Spectrum has just launched on Verizon, and the Nitro has been available for a little over a month. Unsurprisingly, the Optimus LTE has yet to land Europe on account of the lack of widespread LTE coverage on European networks.

We've got the full press release after the break.

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2 years ago

Sony ST25i 'Kumquat' looks set to launch as 'Xperia U'

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We got our first glimpse of the Sony ST25i "Kumquat" last week, and now it seems we may have the official name for the device, too. According to a new entry on the website of the Indonesian telecoms authority, the phone will launch as the Sony Xperia U. This continuing the lettered naming scheme used by the Xperia S, as well as last year's Tablet S and Tablet P.

The ST25i "Xperia U" is rumored to sport a 3.5-inch qHD (960x540) screen, a 1GHz dual-core CPU and 5MP camera, making for an attractive mid-range proposition. An unofficial, leaked roadmap lists the Xperia U around the €260 price point.

As Sony expands its 2012 line-up, we're looking forward to seeing more of the Xperia U, hopefully starting with an official introduction at Mobile World Congress next month.

Source: Postel.go.id; via: GSMArena

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2 years ago

O2 UK network security blunder exposes customers' phone numbers to websites

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Update: O2 says that as of 1400 GMT today it has fixed, the problem, and that "technical changes" as part of "routine maintenance" were to blame for the issue, which affected customers from Jan. 10 until today. The network's full statement is available on its official blog.

Original story: If you're browsing the web on your phone or tablet on O2 UK, then the network could be exposing your phone number to every website you visit. O2 customer Lewis Peckover recently discovered that when you're browsing over 3G on O2, your handset's phone number is often included in the HTTP headers sent to each website you visit, in plain text.

HTTP headers are information exchanged between your browser and the web server before a page is loaded. In theory, the way O2 includes your phone number -- alongside more mundane information like your IP address, browser and OS -- means that any website you visit could easily find out your number. It's worth pointing out that the header used by O2 to send phone numbers -- "x-up-calling-line-id" -- isn't one that's routinely logged by web servers. However, just a couple of lines of code would allow a malicious server to find your phone number just by having you visit a website over 3G.

Lewis Peckover has set up a site to allow O2 customers to see whether they're affected. We've tried this with an O2 SIM in our Galaxy Nexus, and sure enough, there our phone number was in the list of "headers received". If you're on O2, make sure you've got Wifi disabled on your device, then click here and see if you spot your phone number among the HTTP headers. For what it's worth, early reports indicate that not all O2 customers are affected, though a large proportion apparently are.

This isn't an Android-specific problem, however due to the fact that it's a network-level issue, it'll affect Android phones just the same as any other device that's browsing over O2's data network. For this reason, just about anything that connects via HTTP over O2's network could potentially access this information. For its part, O2 says it's "investigating" the issue, and while this is a big deal for O2 customers, the fact that this is a network-level problem should mean that a fix will be relatively quick and easy to deploy.

More: Lew.io; via: ThinkBroadband

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2 years ago

Contest: Win one of five Androidified TPU cases for the Samsung Galaxy Nexus

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OK, OK. We couldn't wait any longer. We picked up five of these "Androidified" TPU Skin Cases from Cruzerlite -- and these are for the Samsung Galaxy Nexus -- just to give away to you fine, upstanding readers of Android Central. Not a fine, upstanding reader of Android Central? Well, you should be. Just saying.

Anyhoo. What you see here is your basic TPU skin case, meaning it feels like a cross between rubber and plastic and fits snugly around your phone. This one's got some nice ribbing along the edges, to help with grip, and there are cutouts for all of the buttons and ports, as well as the secondary microphone. (That's important.) It fits our GSM Galaxy Nexus just fine, as well as Verizon's LTE version.

And we're giving away five of them. In fact, we're giving away the five you see here. How to enter? Just hit the link below for all the deets. Good luck!

Enter to win an "Androidified" TPU skin case for the Samsung Galaxy Nexus!

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2 years ago

Google is streamlining privacy policies, changes effective Mar. 1

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

Google has announced that it is in the process of streamlining its privacy policy, combining more than 60 current documents for various products into one easy to read version, with less of the "legal gloop" and complicated language.  Starting March 1, users will no longer have a different privacy statement for the various Google offerings.  This makes sense to us, especially if the promises of a document that's easy to read and understand hold true.  It likely makes sense for regulators as well, as Google has been under the microscope about it's practices and privacy concerns.

Google's also saying this will lead to a simpler and more immersive user experience, where information from the suite of Google services can be combined to provide more relevant information while using Google branded products.  In the video above, they give the example of how it can improve search results.  Of course, it will also help target the right advertisements to each of us at the same time.

Google also wants to make it clear that they are not changing the basic elements of their privacy policies.  They still won't sell your personal information, and they don't share it without your express permission "except in very limited circumstances like a valid court order."   On the other hand, data about you can now be used across all services where it wasn't (couldn't?) before.  This isn't neccessarily "evil," but it opens things up for a bit deeper discussion and review.  In the end, Google is still going to be Google, and it sounds like the company's really only trying to simplify things for end users like us -- and at the same time making it easier for its own products to use what access you've already granted them. 

Source: Google

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2 years ago

ICS Music Player, Favorite ICS feature [From the Forums]

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We're rocking and rolling through this week thus and there was plenty of news happening today. Miss out on something? Jump on back a page and get yourself caught up and don't forget to jump on into the Android Central forums as well. Whether your looking for help or looking to offer some help -- the Android Central forums is where it's at.

If you're not already a member of the Android Central forums, you can register your account today.

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2 years ago

Kinect meets Android, a new input method is born

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

Imagine a small projector attached to your Android device, and you can use your hand and touch the projected image to navigate the UI through a Kinect attached to a PC.  There's no need to just imagine it any longer, as the Android Kinect Projector Interface project is doing it now.  The developers have built a system where a projector is attached to a Galaxy Nexus, and a Kinect attached to a PC running Simple-Kinect-Touch 2.0 communicates motion to control the running system.  Using a custom AOSP ROM and TUIO for Android "touches" on the projected screen work just like touches on the physical screen would.  Badass tech indeed.  

Of course this is all unofficial and really beta alpha for now, but the idea is solid and the video shows us that it's feasible.  Maybe it's something we will see on the shelves one day.

Source: Recursive Penguin via Phandroid.

More: TUIO for Android; TUIO 2.0 Protocol Specifications

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