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Best Android apps for learning to code

Why Udacity is the best

Finding a lesson in Udacity is as easy as scrolling through the lessons for a given category. There are five main categories with plenty of lessons in each one. Once you've chosen a lesson and you open it up you get all the information that you need to properly complete it.

That information includes a summary of the course explaining what you'll be learning, what prior knowledge you need to successfully complete the course, and a syllabus with a breakdown of each lesson in the module. Additionally you'll also be able to see who developed the course, and what tracks it is useful in. For instance, Intro to Java is useful for Software Engineering, and Android programming.

It's also easy to jump into more advanced courses, provided you already know what you're doing. If you access Udacity online, you can also enroll in Nanodegrees, which do have a hefty price tag, but it contain a full syllabus that can teach you things like fully learning how to build apps for Android or VR.

Conclusion

While there are plenty of apps out there that can help you learn to code from home, Udacity does the best job. They have an emphasis on learning to code, unlike many other apps that have a more varied catalog of lessons to be learned. With input from industry experts, you get access to know-how from professionals in their field.

While you do have to pay for more advanced courses, there is tons available for free and it is excellently curated. Finding the right lesson is also a breeze, thanks to the navigation setup.

Jen is a staff writer who spends her time researching the products you didn't know you needed. She's also a fantasy novelist and has a serious Civ VI addiction. You can follow her on Twitter.

4 Comments
  • SoloLearn is good as an introduction to different languages. It has a compiler that you can run code in. It's also community driven so can leave comments and ask questions to other users.
  • What is everyone's take on sololearn compared to these?
  • "Learn to Code" is really generic. I'd suggest you find out what you'd like to do. What is your end goal? Based on that, you can determine the path to take. Take a fragment of programming...web programming. Even within that segment, I'd suggest completely different paths and learning resources based on what you want to do. Want to know the best way to learn to code? Find someone that does what you want to do. Ask them for advice. Most programmers are ecstatic to talk about their art, and you might even gain a free mentor from it.
  • How can you say udacity is better than sololearn? I learned how to code in 5 different languages from sololearn!