Best portable power stations 2024

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Power station group

(Image credit: Chris Wedel/Android Central)

1. At a glance
2. Best overall
3. Runner-up
4. Best for high output
5. Best small power station
6. Best for portability

Whether you're planning a camping trip or the power just went out, sometimes a great portable power station is exactly what you need. 

The power banks below are compact without sacrificing the energy output you need for your phones, laptops, and other crucial devices. Many of these products also have convenient features like an area LED light and additional port options, little extras that you don't realize you need until you do. 

When exploring these options, consider how you plan to use them. The best portable power banks should have a balance of high energy output, reasonable size and weight, and fast rechargeability. In our opinion, these are your best options, organized by a few helpful categories. 

At a glance

Best overall

EcoFlow Delta Pro Camping

(Image credit: Chris Wedel/Android Central)
Best overall

Reasons to buy

+
Very high power output
+
Fast recharge rates
+
Large battery capacity that's expandable
+
Lots of outlet options
+
Excellent companion app

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy to carry around
-
Pricey

The EcoFlow Delta Pro is an imposing power station. From its power output to the utility it provides, is something that makes this stand out as the best power station. For starters, the Delta Pro is capable of up to 7200W of surge output and 3600W of sustained power. Accessing that juice is possible from the myriad of outlets and ports to run your electrical devices.

From charging up the best Android smartphones from one of its six USB ports, including a 100W USB-C PD that is perfect for recharging a powerful Chromebook like the Chromebook Spin 713, to running essential appliances during a storm outage — like your fridge or a heater — the EcoFlow Delta Pro can handle it. 

For those who enjoy going camping in an RV or travel trailer, the Delta Pro is a dream. During my review, I used the solar generator a lot in my camper by utilizing the built-in 30A outlet to power my whole trailer. Monitoring the output from the companion app or on the helpful display is wonderful. The app also allows you to control many aspects of the unit, including charge capacity and charge rate.

When it comes to recharging the EcoFlow Delta Pro, you can do so from a wall outlet, solar, a car socket, or even an electric vehicle charging station. In fact, with the right combination of output options, the Delta Pro can recharge at a rate of 6500W. 

Capping the Delta Pro experience off, EcoFlow has an excellent assortment of helpful accessories to go with the power station. The battery capacity can be tripled using expansion packs. There's a Smart Generator that runs off gasoline that can be triggered to turn on to recharge the Delta Pro automatically. You can get an adapter that will allow the power station to output electricity at 240V. There's even a smart home panel that will let the solar generator automatically and safely power your home if the power goes out.

The EcoFlow Delta Pro is a hefty, 99lbs, and pricey power station. But the portable electrical opportunities it can provide are well worth it if you can afford it.

Runner-up

Bluetti AC200Max lifestyle

(Image credit: Chris Wedel/Android Central)
Runner-up

Reasons to buy

+
Plenty of choices for outlets and ports
+
Good power output
+
Wireless charging pads built-in
+
Expandable power
+
Built-in outlet covers

Reasons to avoid

-
Only recharges at 500W with included adapter
-
App only works within Bluetooth range
-
The display isn't great in bright environments
-
Pretty heavy

Power stations like the Bluetti AC200Max, while not the most compact options out there, its size is put to good use in both the capacity, output options, and battery power. With a maximum output rating of 4800W surge power and sustained 2200W, you'll have enough juice to handle nearly any electrical needs. Plus, Bluetti packed plenty of outlets and ports for getting power out of the unit to plug in pretty much anything.

From the four AC outlets to five USB ports, including a 100W PD USB-C option, you'll be able to keep plenty of devices up and running. Like the EcoFlow Delta Pro, I loved the 30A RV plug Bluetti included, and the wireless charging pads on top, during my review. Another thing this solar generator has in common with the Delta Pro is that it's heavy — but not quite as much, coming in at 62lbs. 

The AC200Max is prepped for expansion with additional battery packs, works with a home panel to power your home safely in an electrical outage, and has an optional accessory to allow 240V power. There's also an app to help monitor and control the unit when you don't feel like using the touch screen display — or can't read it because it's too bright outside. Just remember that the app only connects via Bluetooth, so if you're not close to the AC200Max, your app won't help.

When recharging the AC200Max, as any excellent power station should, it can handle power from multiple sources — solar, wall outlet, car socket, and even an EV charging station. The wall adapter included with the power station is bulky, and only capable of 500W. This means if you're only using it to refill the unit — it will take a while. But if you combine sources, it can recharge up to 1400W.

Best for high output

Anker 757 PowerHouse power station

(Image credit: Chris Wedel/Android Central)
Best for high output

Reasons to buy

+
Very fast rechargeability
+
Not too heavy
+
Good power output
+
Helpful LED area light

Reasons to avoid

-
No app
-
Doesn't have a 30A outlet

Anker is well-known for making some of the best power banks, and has been in the power station game for a while, too. The Anker PowerHouse II 400 is a solid choice of battery for a smaller option. That being said, this is the largest solar generator yet from the power accessory brand, and it's a good one. 

With surge output of 2400W and 1500W of sustained power from the six AC outlets, you'll have enough power for many of your electrical needs. Along with the AC outlets, there are four USB-A ports, a 100W USB-C port, a 60W USB-C port, and a car socket. Anker even put one of my favorite features of these power stations in the 757 — and LED area light. But remember, you won't be able to plug a 30A RV cable directly into it.

After you've used up the power supply, Anker designed the 757 PowerHouse to get back to full quickly. Plugging into a wall outlet, you'll be able to recharge the power station at up to 1000W, getting it from 0-80% in an hour and 0-100% in an hour and a half. You can also charge it up using up to 300W max of solar. However, you won't be able to monitor anything on the unit with an app — you'll have to use the wonderful built-in display to check up on it.

I've been using the Anker 757 PowerHouse for a couple of months, and knowing that something this sturdy and relatively small can go with you to power anything from a window AC unit to a projector is impressive. It's a little hard to say that this power station is compact, with dimensions of 18.2 x 11.3 x 9.3 in and weighing in at 44lbs. However, when you consider everything it is capable of, it really isn't bad. The integrated handles are solid and make it easy to carry.

Best small power station

Fanttik Evo 300 power station

(Image credit: Chris Wedel/Android Central)
Best small power station

Reasons to buy

+
Very well-built
+
The display offers good information
+
Built-in LED area light
+
It can recharge very quickly

Reasons to avoid

-
The display can be hard to read in bright environments
-
Its charging inverter is a bit bulky

A small power station is perfect when you want to power something like one of the best Chromebooks for a remote work session or keep some small essential items powered during an outage. The Fanttik EVO 300 is just the ticket for these situations, thanks to its 300W output rating and excellent portability.

I enjoyed using the EVO 300 during my review because it's well-built and weighs just under nine pounds. There are plenty of output options with two USB-A, two USB-C ports, and the two DC5521 barrel ports to complement the two 110V AC outlets. Recharging this excellent power station is done via USB-C, solar, or the bulky AC adapter. A maximum recharge rate of 145W gets this unit back to full from zero in about 2.5hrs. But to reach that rate, be sure you have an excellent 100W USB-C charger and use one of the best USB-C cables.

While there is little to not like about this handy portable power station, the display is both great and not so much. It stretches nearly the entire length of the unit, and in dim to normal lighting, it looks great. There is helpful information about the EVO 300's status, but it is extremely difficult to read in brighter environments. With that said, this is a fantastic option for power on the go with needs for 300W or less.

Best for extra portability

Jackery Explorer 300

(Image credit: Chris Wedel/Android Central)
Best for extra portability

Reasons to buy

+
Very compact and easy to carry
+
Decent array of output ports
+
Can recharge at a fast rate
+
Rechargeable via multiple methods

Reasons to avoid

-
No LED area light
-
Limited info on the display
-
Bulky external charging adapter

When the external charging adapter is almost as large as the power station itself, it says one of two things — the charging adapter is big, or the power station is small. In this case, it's a bit of both for the Jackery Explorer 300. The solar generator is a mere 9.1 x 5.2 x 7.8 inches and weighs just over seven pounds, but part of keeping the unit so compact is to go with an external wall adapter, and they're rarely small.

While the Explorer 300 is demure in size, its power output is not. The 293Wh capacity battery is capable of a 500W surge output and up to 300W sustained from the two AC outlets, three USB ports, or car socket. The power station can handle input from either the wall adapter, USB-C, solar, or a combination of those options to recharge quickly.

I've loved using the Jackery Explorer 300 both for its power output and its compact size. But I do wish that its display offered a bit more. It will only show the input and output rate, and the battery percentage, with no indication of an estimated runtime. I'd also like to have seen Jackery put an LED area light on it, as this could be really helpful on this small power station.


Power for more than just your phone 

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When buying a power station, it's good to know your use case. Knowing how much power output and wattage you need, what you'll want to plug into it, and how long you need a device to run for. There are other factors to consider like portability, app support, durability, and others. These units don't come cheap, but can be essential in an emergency or helpful in leisure times.

Power stations like these, or solar generators as they're sometimes called thanks to their ability to recharge via the sun, are great to have around for a variety of reasons. If you want portable power to run large appliances or tools, then the EcoFlow Delta Pro is an excellent choice. At 3200W, there isn't much it can't power, and when combined with its ecosystem of accessories, it can even act as a backup power source for your home.

But the Delta Pro isn't the lightest and most compact portable power station. Plus, you may just be in the market to run less power-hungry devices, and something like the AlphaESS AP1000 could take care of your electrical needs. Its relatively compact size and good 1000W output is a good middle-of-the-road power option. For capacity, compactness, and power options, it's hard to go wrong with the Fanttik EVO 300. It's great for powering your smaller devices or even lighting a room during an electrical outage. Regardless of your need, there is a portable power station that can solve it.

Chris Wedel
Smart Home Writer
Chris Wedel is a fan of all things tech and gadgets. Living in rural Kansas with his wife and two young boys makes finding ways to get and stay online tricky. By utilizing his years of experience with the tech and mobile communications industries — success is assured. When not conquering connectivity challenges and testing new gadgets, he enjoys cruising a gravel road in his UTV with some good tunes.
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