Best overall

LG V30

LG V30

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LG's V series has always been great for video, and the V30 carries on the tradition. Dual lenses backed up by solid sensors handle the basics, but it's the advanced shooting modes that really let the V30 shine.

Not only do you have advanced control over colors with the Cine Log mode, but you also have extra tweaks and features that pull off pro-like shots even if you don't know the mechanics of how to do it manually. You also get a full manual shooting mode if you need to do something specific.

Bottom line: For the most video features and tools, look no further than the V30.

One more thing: The V30 is still plenty capable when shooting in any of the automatic modes, too.

Why the LG V30 is the best

LG has positioned all of its V-series phones as being tuned for "content creation," and the V30 keeps up with that perfectly. We know it's quite capable for still photos, but its advanced video tools really make it shine.

Manual control and tons of shooting modes rule the roost here.

The core of the V30's video capabilities starts with its dual cameras, one with a standard focal length lens and another with a super wide-angle lens. It lets you shoot with one or the other, but also seamlessly "zoom" from the wide lens into the tighter one for a dramatic effect. That's paired up with all of the standard shooting modes, including 4K resolution and slow motion.

But then LG goes wild with additional software. You get a complete manual shooting mode where you can tweak every parameter, including your audio recording. And then you get extra features like "Cine Log" that lets you shoot in a new format that can be tweaked later, or use a dramatic "Point Zoom" for a smooth zoom in on a subject.

In our LG V30 review, Alex Dobie breaks down the power of Cine Log mode:

[LG Cine Log] lets you capture footage that, on the surface, might appear more washed-out than regular video shot in Auto mode, but it's captured a way that lets you bring out more shadow or highlight detail when you process it later. There's also an array of presets in Cine Log mode that lets you give your footage a particular kind of look — like warm tones for an action movie, cooler hues for a more romantic look, or sepia tones for an old-timey vibe.

Really, you get all the tools you could expect in something the size of a smartphone. When paired with a tripod and some time, the V30 can produce some great videos.

Best stabilization

Google Pixel 2 (and 2 XL)

Google Pixel 2 and 2 XL

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Like its predecessor, the Google Pixel 2 has absolutely fantastic video stabilization that's just unrivaled in smartphones. The new phone adds OIS to the already fantastic EIS to create buttery smooth video whether you're riding along in a car or train, or just walking down the street with the phone in your hand.

Google uses some pretty advanced software to process the video and smooth it out, and it does so without much of the jarring "jelly" effect that you sometimes see when adding stabilization after the fact in video editors. The camera app doesn't offer other advanced features, but it absolutely nails the stabilization.

Bottom line: If all you want to do is shoot stable video on the move and don't need any other advanced features, the Pixel 2 is the one to get.

One more thing: For the exact same video experience in a larger size (with a higher price), consider the 6-inch Pixel 2 XL.

Best telephoto

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

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For those who don't need the super-advanced video features of the V30, you'll find the Galaxy Note 8 is a great alternative. It also offers dual cameras, but in this case the second is a "telephoto" lens that helps you zoom in without reducing resolution.

The Note 8 is plenty capable with 4K, 1080p 60 fps and 720p 240 fps slow motion, and the ability to switch on the fly between the two lenses with ease. It has OIS and EIS, but it isn't the same kind of amazing stabilization as what the Pixel 2 offers.

The Galaxy Note 8 also offers just a downright bigger screen to use as a viewfinder, which you may find useful.

Bottom line: For a huge screen and the ability to shoot with a telephoto lens, this is a great choice.

One more thing: You're going to pay more for the Note 8 than any of the phones on this list.

Conclusion

The V30 is the best Android phone for video thanks to its dual cameras, great core features and advanced shooting modes that help anyone take great shots.

Best overall

LG V30

LG V30

See at AT&T See at Verizon See at Sprint See at T-Mobile

LG's V-series has always been great for video, and the V30 carries on the tradition. Dual lenses backed up by solid sensors handle the basics, but it's the advanced shooting modes that really let the V30 shine.

Not only do you have advanced control over colors with the Cine Log mode, but you also have extra tweaks and features that pull off pro-like shots even if you don't know the mechanics of how to do it manually. You also get a full manual shooting mode if you need to do something specific.

Bottom line: For the most video features and tools, look no further than the V30.

One more thing: The V30 is still plenty capable when shooting in any of the automatic modes, too.

Update November 2017: The list has been revamped, with the V30, Pixel 2 and Galaxy Note 8 taking over from the V20, Pixel and Galaxy S8.