T-Mobile CEO John Legere

Terms of trade-ins and pricing not entirely clear at this point

T-Mobile is set to make the first major revision to its JUMP! upgrade plans, giving you the freedom to upgrade as often as you'd like. According to documents acquired by TmoNews, starting February 23rd T-Mobile will remove restrictions on JUMP! that kept customers from upgrading more than twice every 12 months.

The current system with JUMP! indicates that you must wait six months after purchasing your phone before trading it in, then forgiving the rest of your financing payments so that you can pick out and finance a new device. With this impending change you will be able to trade in your phone regardless of how long you've been paying it off, but it isn't entirely sure whether or not you'll have to pay to make up the difference to a new phone (having made few monthly installments). Again referring to this leaked information, it seems T-Mobile will forgive any outstanding financing balance for your original handset, up to half of the phone's original cost.

If the value of the phone you're trading in covers at least 50 percent of its original price, you'll be cleared to pick out a new phone for $0 down and begin financing it. It isn't completely clear at this point how (or if) T-Mobile will expect you to make up the difference if your phone is no longer worth at least half of what it was when you purchased, but that should be cleared up when the changes actually go live.

Indications are that existing JUMP! customers will be brought into the new system automatically, with the ability to upgrade as soon as they'd like, so long as they've been a JUMP! customer for at least six months (the old wait period). Tablets are getting added into the JUMP! program as well, although we're not sure how many people will really take advantage of that deal. In fact, we're not sure how many people will want to upgrade their device more often than every six months in any circumstance — at least T-Mobile gets the good publicity of removing restrictions from the program.

Source: TmoNews