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Emoji translation in Google Chrome

Chrome for Android will translate the web into emoji

Lest you think you'd have to wait for April 1st for all of Google's April Fools' Day jocularity, there's more to be had tonight: try translate to emoji in Chrome on for size. That's what Google has in store for Chrome on Android, but they very cleverly intended it be saved for the day itself —...
Drag and drop uploading Google Play Music

Experimental Google Play Music Chrome app brings drag and drop uploading and mini player

Google Labs Chrome app also allows music uploading from your Chromebook There's a new entry in the Google Labs section of Google Play Music, and enabling it brings a whole new way to upload — and listen to — your own music. The feature — which is still experimental, thus the "Labs" label —...
Google now

Google Now rolling out to Chrome desktop users

Roll out begins today, should be available for all in the next few weeks We've seen Google Now for Chrome on the desktop for folks using beta builds, but starting today it's pushing out to all users. You won't need to fiddle with any settings or flags or do any sort of wizardry, but you will...

Chrome OS - Top Articles

Chrome Remote Desktop

Chrome Remote Desktop app exits beta, controls your computer on any ICS and above device

Just a couple of weeks after a full-fledged Chrome Remote Desktop app entered closed beta testing it has been opened up for all to use through the Play Store. The completely free app will let your Android device — assuming it's running Android 4.0 or above — connect to and control any computer...
Microsoft Word Online

Office Online arrives in the Chrome Web Store

Microsoft has made Office Online available on the Google Chrome Web Store. While Office Online has always worked in Chrome, Chrome users install Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote Online in the Chrome App Launcher. Office Online will go head-to-head with Google's productivity apps right in...
Google fixes Heartbleed

Google updates back-end in light of Heartbleed vulnerability

If you've been online at some point in the last 36 hours, chances are you've heard of 'Heartbleed', a flaw in OpenSSL that has exposed data to theft on approximately 2/3 of servers in use around the globe over the past two years. It's not known how bad the damage may be, but the revelation of the...
Chrome update on HTC One

Chrome update fixes audio bug that plagued the HTC One

A quick heads up, folks, that the Chrome browser for Android has gotten an update today. The changelog is vague in the usual ways, noting "stability and security updates." But for those who are using an HTC One, you'll need to download this new version right away, as it fixes a pretty annoying...
Google now

Google Now rolling out to Chrome desktop users

Roll out begins today, should be available for all in the next few weeks We've seen Google Now for Chrome on the desktop for folks using beta builds, but starting today it's pushing out to all users. You won't need to fiddle with any settings or flags or do any sort of wizardry, but you will...
Drag and drop uploading Google Play Music

Experimental Google Play Music Chrome app brings drag and drop uploading and mini player

Google Labs Chrome app also allows music uploading from your Chromebook There's a new entry in the Google Labs section of Google Play Music, and enabling it brings a whole new way to upload — and listen to — your own music. The feature — which is still experimental, thus the "Labs" label —...
Google Chrome

Chrome Remote Desktop enters closed beta on Android

As far as power user features go, a remote desktop app is up there in terms of hardcore functionality. That doesn't mean there aren't plenty of options even on mobile, and Google is getting ready to get in on the game with its Chrome Remote Desktop app that has just dropped into Google Play....
Google Chrome

Chrome for Android updated to version 33, brings minor user-facing changes

New version will roll out to users over the next few days Google has updated the Chrome browser for Android today, bringing the version number up to 33.0.1750.132. Along with the usual performance and stability tweaks, there are several changes highlighted by the Chrome team. Download progress...
Google Now on Desktop

Google Now is (unsurprisingly) coming to your desktop

In what should be considered an inevitable (and welcomed) move, Google Now notifications are coming to Chrome for Mac and Windows — and you can try them out today. The latest version of the Chrome Canary app (that's Chrome's dev version, basically) includes a flag for turning on the notifications...
Google hears all

Yes, Chrome may be listening — because you told it to

Windows with permission to listen to your microphone keep listening until they are closed There's news today about a new exploit in Chrome, that centers around the recently-introduced listening features. The new feature is not just limited to Google search, and any webmaster can implement it on...

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Chrome Remote Desktop

Just a couple of weeks after a full-fledged Chrome Remote Desktop app entered closed beta testing it has been opened up for all to use through the Play Store. The completely free app will let your Android device — assuming it's running Android 4.0 or above — connect to and control any computer you have the Chrome Remote Desktop software installed on.

The client is simple, but mimics closely what you find doing computer-to-computer remote access with its existing Chrome and desktop clients. You can see all computers listed by the Google account they're associated with, connect by entering a PIN and control your computer from anywhere. You simply swipe around on the screen to move the cursor, tap to click and tap and hold to drag for selections or to move windows. The app offers a full on-screen keyboard for text input and a one-tap ctrl-alt-del button for those controlling Windows machines.

The app has worked pretty smoothly on our Nexus 7, but it's clear that you won't be getting any super heavy work done on a small screen controlling a full desktop operating system. For those who need remote desktop in pinch though, Chrome Remote Desktop is one of the simplest ways to go now.

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Microsoft has made Office Online available on the Google Chrome Web Store. While Office Online has always worked in Chrome, Chrome users install Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote Online in the Chrome App Launcher. Office Online will go head-to-head with Google's productivity apps right in Google's own store.

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If you've been online at some point in the last 36 hours, chances are you've heard of 'Heartbleed', a flaw in OpenSSL that has exposed data to theft on approximately 2/3 of servers in use around the globe over the past two years. It's not known how bad the damage may be, but the revelation of the vulnerability sent server teams around the world scrambling to patch their systems. Among them: Google. In a posting today on the Google Online Security Blog, Google revealed that they had patched OpenSSL vulnerabilities in a number of their services.

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As far as power user features go, a remote desktop app is up there in terms of hardcore functionality. That doesn't mean there aren't plenty of options even on mobile, and Google is getting ready to get in on the game with its Chrome Remote Desktop app that has just dropped into Google Play. Unfortunately this isn't available for just anyone — it's in a closed beta right now, and few people have access at this point.

We do have the screenshots from the Play Store listing, though, and a quick indication of how it's working. Remote Desktop functionality has been built into Chrome and Chrome OS for some time, and actually works quite well on the desktop side of things. If Google can bring that experience over to mobile, we can see more than a few people taking advantage — especially on larger devices with 7-inch or higher screen sizes that can manipulate a desktop environment. The best part about Google getting in on the game is it provides another great free option to choose from.

Unless you're one of the lucky few who was invited to the closed beta you'll be waiting a while to see this for yourself, but at least we know it's coming.

Source: Droid-Life

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Emoji translation in Google Chrome

Lest you think you'd have to wait for April 1st for all of Google's April Fools' Day jocularity, there's more to be had tonight: try translate to emoji in Chrome on for size. That's what Google has in store for Chrome on Android, but they very cleverly intended it be saved for the day itself — the hidden feature doesn't activate until the date and time matches that of April 1st. But you can trick it by manually skipping your date forward to April 1st, when a tap on the overflow menu will offer you the Translate to Emoji (with a little yellow dude on a surfboard).

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Google Labs Chrome app also allows music uploading from your Chromebook

There's a new entry in the Google Labs section of Google Play Music, and enabling it brings a whole new way to upload — and listen to — your own music.

The feature — which is still experimental, thus the "Labs" label — enables two things. First off, it gives you a nice little mini-player that offers full control over your current playlist. It looks a lot like an Android app, except it runs on a laptop or desktop computer. Those that micro-manage real estate on their screen should love it.

The second thing it does is a big deal. To upload your own files into Google Play Music, you have to use a helper application. This app can be a little janky, and often times it seems to ignore bandwidth throttling settings and takes over. In general, it's not a good experience for a lot of people, and a pain when you want to upload just a few songs. This is all a thing of the past if you enable the new Labs feature, because it allows drag and drop uploading of files and folders. Desktop operating system users will love it, but the folks who are happiest are Chromebook users. Yes, it works completely inside Chrome.

Enabling it is easy enough, but it is hidden. Here's a quick walkthrough of setting it up.

  • Open the Google Play Music website inside the Chrome browser.
  • In the upper right, under your Google profile picture, is a gear icon. Click it and choose "Labs" from the list.
  • At the top of the Labs page, enable Google Play Music for Chrome.
  • Close the Labs page, and when in the main window click the new orange "Add Music" button. this will trigger the installation of an extension. This extension is the good stuff you need.

When finished, you can click the Add Music button to drag and drop songs or whole folders full of songs, and get to the mini-player by clicking the small arrow in the very bottom right of the Google Play Music window.

We don't know how experimental (read: buggy) this is just yet, but we do know it's been a long time coming.

Via: The Verge

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Roll out begins today, should be available for all in the next few weeks

We've seen Google Now for Chrome on the desktop for folks using beta builds, but starting today it's pushing out to all users. You won't need to fiddle with any settings or flags or do any sort of wizardry, but you will need to be on the latest version of Chrome — which you should be anyway for security reasons. Once Google Now for Chrome is available for you, you use it just like you would on the phone, with reminders and cards in your tray, and voice commands through the Google website. For more information, see this Google help topic page.

Source: +Google Chrome

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A quick heads up, folks, that the Chrome browser for Android has gotten an update today. The changelog is vague in the usual ways, noting "stability and security updates."

But for those who are using an HTC One, you'll need to download this new version right away, as it fixes a pretty annoying audio bug that would cause the phone to launch straight into speakerphone mode when placing a call — damned near deafening, thanks to that Boomsound thing blasting from the front-facing speakers. Not everyone saw this bug — but for those of us who did, this is a most welcome fix.

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Just say "Ok Google"

Google Voice Search has been slowly rolling out to the Google Chrome browser for some time now, and now the beta version is just listening for your command. The listening search box is present on Google.com and in new blank tabs, and just like with the Google Now Launcher it is always listening for the command "Ok Google". Say that and Google Voice Search springs to life, waiting for you to perform a search, set a timer, or whatever else it is you want to do through Google.

The latest beta version has the option enabled, though according to the Google Chrome Blog the feature "will be rolled out to English (U.S.) users on Windows, Mac and Linux over the next few days, with support for additional languages and Chrome OS coming soon."

All you need is the latest Chrome beta for your hands-free Googling, and you can download that right here

Source: Google Chrome Blog

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New version will roll out to users over the next few days

Google has updated the Chrome browser for Android today, bringing the version number up to 33.0.1750.132. Along with the usual performance and stability tweaks, there are several changes highlighted by the Chrome team.

  • Download progress notification for file downloads using the Chrome network stack
  • Updated help and feedback UI
  • Support for <datalist> tag

The new help and feedback UI is a simple modification that opens the help center in its own view, with its own action bar. The functionality is the same, just with a new look.

The new version will follow the usual Google #trollout, and all users should expect to have it within the next few days. Try your luck by using the Google Play link above.

Source: Google

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Public beta available for developers and those who like living on the bleeding edge

A quick heads up for Chromecast fans everywhere, that Google has released a public beta track of the Google Cast extension for Chrome. It's aimed at developers working with the newly released public Chromecast SDK, but it's available for anyone who wants to use it from the Chrome Web Store.

The Google Cast beta will gain early access to new APIs and features in advance of the regular consumer version and will update automatically. For more, hit up the Google Developers portal or download from the Chrome Web Store at the link below.

Download: Google Cast beta for Chrome

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VMware partnership to bring Windows desktop apps to Chrome OS through the cloud

Virtualization company VMware is to help bring Windows desktop applications to Chrome OS in partnership with Google. VMWare's Horizon DaaS (Desktop as a Service) will allow Chromebook users in enterprise to bring connect to a virtual "Windows experience" in the cloud, where they can run Windows desktop apps through Google's browser-centric OS. The move is a challenge to Microsoft in the enterprise space as Google looks to pick away at Redmond's market share among businesses.

Google will be hoping an easier transition from Windows to Chrome OS will allow it to wean enterprise customers off the Microsoft ecosystem, while making Chromebooks more appealing to those still reliant on full-blown Windows apps. In its blog post today Google points to the impending end-of-life date for Windows XP — Apr. 8, 2014 — as well as the need to migrate "legacy" applications to more up-to-date hardware, and the security advantages of running older software in a virtualized environment.

The new DaaS service is available now through VMware's Horizon View 5.3 software as an "on-premise" service, with plans to deploy the software to the Chrome Web Store at a future date.

Source: Google Enterprise

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Auto-enabled for beta track users from this week

We've already taken a first look at Google Now for the desktop, when Google added it to the bleeding edge Canary builds of Chrome. Today, Google drops word that starting this week, folks a bit further up the chain on the beta track on Mac, Windows or Chrome OS will get access to the same card based notification system we're all familiar with from our Android devices. 

Unlike with the Canary build, you don't need to mess around with enabling flags here. Look for the bell icon on Mac or Windows or the numbered box on your Chromebook to open up your notifications. We've been impressed with it so far from our early look, so if you want to give it a whirl load up the beta build and let us know what you think. 

Download: Chrome beta, More: Google Chrome Blog

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Windows with permission to listen to your microphone keep listening until they are closed

There's news today about a new exploit in Chrome, that centers around the recently-introduced listening features. The new feature is not just limited to Google search, and any webmaster can implement it on his or her site with minimal coding. That is exactly the sort of thing that leads to scary-sounding issues, like the one today. 

In a nutshell, a website can ask for permission to use your microphone. Once granted, it can open another window from the same domain, and listen to the sounds coming in from your mic. Even if you surf away from the original window that asked permission. This becomes a problem when users lose track of what windows they may have open, and leave a sneakily placed pop up window running all day long to listen to everything it can hear.

But is this the expected behavior? Read on.

More: Talater.com

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In what should be considered an inevitable (and welcomed) move, Google Now notifications are coming to Chrome for Mac and Windows — and you can try them out today.

The latest version of the Chrome Canary app (that's Chrome's dev version, basically) includes a flag for turning on the notifications, as spotted by the Google Operating System blog. To turn on the notifications, you'll need to enable chrome://flags/#enable-google-now, then relaunch. Make sure you're signed in, and you should start seeing Google Now notifications in either the Windows tray or the Mac system bar. 

It's pretty slick, and we're seeing all the same notifications as on our phone. Give it a whirl if you'd like.

Download: Canary; More: Google OS blog; Thanks, Adam!

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Cut data usage when browsing by up to 50%

Chrome's data compression feature, which has been in the beta channel since version 28, is making its way to the stable channel for all users. The feature, if you haven't used it before, channels your data through a proxy server to cut down on the mobile data you eventually use on your phone or tablet. The result is a decrease of up to 50 percent in data usage from browsing — that's nothing to shake a stick at.

On a side note, the latest Chrome release will also enable a feature that lets you pin shortcuts to pages on your homescreen. Simply hit the menu button and you'll see a new option of "Add to homescreen" — no more bookmarking and adding a bookmark widget to your phone manually.

We're not yet seeing an update to Chrome on our own devices, but when it does finally roll out it will have these two features enabled. To turn on data compression, simply head into the settings, tap "Bandwidth management" and toggle the button to "on." It's that simple.

Source: Google Chrome Blog

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For those of you rocking the stable (ie not beta) version of the Chrome browser, be aware that an update is headed your way. Chrome 31 has been promoted to the stable track, and it brings forth the ability to print from a device running Android 4.4 KitKat (though it appears that's also in Chrome 30 on the Nexus 4 — but whatever), a better autofill/autocomplete experience, and the requisite stability and security enhancements.

And speaking of security, Google also announced it forked over (another) lump of money to Pinkie Pie after a couple more exploits were uncovered. Gotta love pwn2own.

Source: Google

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KitKat's low-memory focus extends to Chrome's latest beta release

Behind all the visual changes and feature additions, Android 4.4 KitKat is all about optimizing the way Android uses memory, including a new API for handling devices with as little as 512MB of RAM. And it seems this focus has extended to Google's Chrome browser too — Googler François Beaufort points out on Google+ that the latest Chrome Beta includes an alternative tab-switcher for low-RAM phones. As you'll see above, it consists of just a text description and icon, as opposed to a full-page preview.

Beaufort says the new layout is designed to be simpler and is specifically targeted at "low memory KitKat devices." In the current Chrome 31 beta it can be enabled by navigating to chrome://flags/#accessibility-tab-switcher and flipping the switch manually. The idea, presumably, is that when entry-level KitKat phones begin shipping this new tab-switcher will automatically replace the traditional card-based layout, while leaving the standard interface in place on beefier phones like the Nexus 5.

Source: +François Beaufort

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Web-based control panel allows administration of site access and browsing history for 'supervised users'

Google has announced a new feature for Chrome, and it's part of the beta channel for users who want to try it this week. The "Supervised Users" option will be folded into ChromeOS, as well as the Chrome browser on Windows Mac and Linux. it does just what it says on the tin — allows user accounts that can be access restricted.

Supervised users will not be required to sign in with a Google account, and the administrator can grant or deny access to any site — or even allow browsing to only white-listed sites. The admin panel is web-based at chrome.com/manage, where rules can be set and browsing history can be peeked at by the authenticated administrator. The new tools and website will be part of the beta channel update later this week.

This is great news for parents of young children, as well as Kiosk applications. We'll be giving this one a look when it pushes out.

Source: Google

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The Chrome stable channel for Android has a new update brewing, with a short new feature list. According to Google, the update will enable new gestures.

  • Swipe horizontally across the top toolbar to quickly switch tabs.
  • Drag vertically down from the toolbar to enter into the tab switcher view.
  • Drag down from the menu to open the menu and select the item you want without having to lift your finger.

We saw these gestures hit the beta channel last month and they seem to work well.

Users should expect to see the new update shortly, thanks to Google's new rolling release strategy. 

Source: Google Chrome blog

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