Skip to main content

How do you take and edit pictures with your phone? [Roundtable]

Having a great camera on your phone is a must in 2017. Even so-called budget models phones have a decent camera, and the high-end devices from every company in the game can all take some awesome pictures.

But there's usually more involved in taking a great pic than just tapping the shutter button. This week, we're going around the table to talk about how we take pictures and what we do with them from start to finish.

More: Best Android camera

Russell Holly

Editing on a phone

When taking photos with my phone, I almost always use the stock app. Especially nowadays, the default apps made by the manufacturers are typically quite good. I will occasionally try a specific kind of shot in a standalone app, like "supersampled" photos in Camera Super Pixel (opens in new tab), but that's about it.

The camera apps from the companies making these phones are usually pretty good.

Editing depends on what I'm doing. Most of the time I'm happy with the Auto button in Google Photos, but I will occasionally play around in Snapseed if I'm bored. I also edit work photos on my phone through Lightroom, usually by connecting the USB-C SD card reader (opens in new tab) to my phone and pulling the RAW photos I shot with my Olympus. I have to be in a pretty big hurry to go that far though, so it doesn't happen often.

Ara Wagoner

I try to take pictures with the Samsung Galaxy S8 or the Google Pixel — the Pixel if I can help it because of its stabilization features — and apart from dragging up and down the exposure adjustment, I shoot on automatic. I don't go in for the full manual tweaking, I want good focus, relatively even light, everything inside the frame, and the rest I'll fix in Photoshop.

I edit my pics in Photoshop and save a great web-friendly version.

Apart from rotating and cropping, I don't edit photos on my phones; I have Photoshop (opens in new tab) for that. I have three shortcuts in Photoshop I use on just about every picture: Alt + L for Levels, where I just the brightness and shadows of the photos, C for cropping out what I don't need in the shot, and Ctrl + Alt + Shift + S to Save For Web, where I output my photos in an article-friendly format and size.

Alex Dobie

When I'm shooting on the Samsung Galaxy S8 or HTC U11, I pretty much always use the stock camera app in Auto mode. There are a few exceptions, like long exposures or macro shots that sometimes necessitate a trip into Manual or Pro mode. But those are pretty rare.

The stock app in auto mode almost always gets the job done.

For photo backup, I use a combination of Dropbox and Google Photos: the former because it's an extremely easy way to get all my photos onto both the computers I regularly use, the latter because it's a superior photo service.

I don't edit every single shot I take, but when I do it's generally in Snapseed or Photoshop Fix. Adobe's app is great at eliminating window smudges and other blemishes. Google is great at tuning up images and making them look better across the board. The other tool in my arsenal is Instagram, and if I post something to the photo sharing platform I'll usually spend a lot of time tweaking levels to get an image looking just right.

Andrew Martonik

No matter which phone I'm currently using, I stick to the stock camera app for the fastest performance and best processing. On occasion when I'm using a phone without a time lapse mode, I'll install and use the Microsoft Hyperlapse app (opens in new tab), but that's it.

The editing tools in Google Photos have impressed me.

I use Google Photos (opens in new tab) as my default gallery app on each phone to keep things consistent as I jump around devices. I pay for Google Drive storage to backup full-quality images, and because of that, I've turned off my Dropbox automatic camera backup.

I've actually been very impressed by the editing tools in Google Photos as well. The "auto" enhance feature does a great job for most photos, but sometimes I hop in and move around specific sliders to get the exact look I want. The best part of Google Photos is that these edits are synced back to all of my phones and the Photos website — I'm not really interested in making one-off edits that I then lose as soon as I move to a new phone.

Harish Jonnalagadda

I primarily relied on the Pixel XL or the Galaxy S8 to shoot images over the last six months. Both phones have capable camera apps, but the one annoyance I have with the Pixel is that it won't retain the camera position — if I switch to the front camera and close the app, it will reset to the rear camera when I open it again.

The Galaxy S8 has more features, but the Pixel wins for simplicity.

That minor drawback aside, I love taking images with the Pixel XL. It is a breeze to shoot in Auto mode — which is what I use almost exclusively — and Google's proficiency at software processing means that I get a great image nine times out of ten. The Galaxy S8 has more features baked in, but when it comes to simplicity, the Pixel wins out.

For editing, I exclusively use Aviary (opens in new tab). The Adobe-owned tool has all the features I need from a mobile image editor — a ton of effects, the ability to tweak the brightness, contrast, and exposure among other things, and easy sharing options to Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

Florence Ion

Whether I'm shooting with the Pixel XL or Galaxy S8, one thing is for certain — VSCO (opens in new tab) is the only app I'll use to filter my photos before they go to Instagram.

No matter what phone I use, the pics go through VSCO before they get shared.

The abundant filtering suite has been around for quite a while in the app world, so if you've been editing photos specifically for social media, then you're probably familiar with its hipster-like, millennial aesthetic.

You know, as I'm writing this, I'm wondering if I should expand the selection of what I use to edit photos now that I'm older. At my age, that same laissez faire attitude doesn't cut it. Life is about responsibilities and paying your debt to society. It's about embracing your vulnerabilities, and admitting that you've been defeated. It's about coming to terms with the reality at hand.

Perhaps I just shouldn't use any filters at all.

Marc Lagace

I've always been fine with using the stock camera app. I've been bouncing between a Google Pixel and a Samsung Galaxy S8 lately, and both feature outstanding cameras that launch really quick.

The Google Pixel and a style ring is how I roll.

The edge goes to the Pixel because Google Photos is my preferred editing app on both phones. In terms of accessories, I have a style ring (opens in new tab) on all my phones, which gives me more confidence in my grip and me keep a steady hand when framing a shot — especially handy when I'm shooting video.

The only other photography quirk I have is I love to use Snapchat at concerts or music festivals because it's fast as hell and full of quick filters and other effects. I save everything to my Snap Story and then download it to my camera roll later so I can extract and edit together a highlight reel in Google Photos.

Jen Karner

I'm pretty simple when it comes to taking and editing my photos. I tend to shoot in automatic with whatever phone I'm currently using — right now that means my Pixel XL — without really messing with any of the settings. I do have a tremble in my hands though, so anytime I can I use a device with stabilization. I don't really use the advanced or manual features, even when they're available because I prefer to just snap a photo in the heat of the moment without really thinking about composition, light, or anything else.

I keep it simple, both when taking a pic and when editing them.

I'm just as simple when it comes to editing photos. If I'm mostly happy with it, then I might tweak it using Instagram filters, or by running it through Prisma to make it really pop. If it needs some more adjustments I'll use the editing tools available through Google Photos, which are generally more than competent at getting me to the result I want.

Jerry Hildenbrand

I've got a top-secret built-in weapon for taking pictures: My wheelchair. Yup. Being on or in something relatively solid and with places to rest your arms makes any camera a little better. Hey, I might as well benefit from it, right?

Get familiar with the settings no matter which phone or app you use.

When it comes to the phone I use, my choice would be the LG V10. Newer models from Samsung and Google and LG technically have better cameras, but I have messed with manual modes and settings on the V10 enough to be comfortable with it. That makes a difference. After you have the right light in the right place and your shot framed, getting the exposure perfect is the most important thing you can do no matter what equipment you're using. And for those quick shots with zero set-up time, the V10 in auto was still a pretty good shooter.

Afterward, it's Snapseed for any editing because it's just so easy. Usually just a crop or a bit of color adjustment. For a photo that is so great it needs the full monty, I'll pull it off and edit on my computer in Lightroom. Then "adjust" the EXIF data and copy it to my Pixel so I can upload a full-res version for backup without eating up my Google Photos space. 🙂

Daniel Bader

Galaxy S8. Google Photos. Auto mode. Occasionally VSCO or Snapseed before uploading to Instagram. Yeah, I'm boring.

But when I'm taking photos with a camera that doesn't have a tiny sensor I'm typically using the Sony RX100 IV, an amazing little point and shoot that, through the PlayMemories app, can create a Wi-Fi Direct connection to my phone and transfer photos quickly and painlessly. The UI is pretty terrible, but it gets the job done, and makes it really easy to cheat at Instagram.

Best third-party camera app

I'm also going to take this moment to lament the lack of great third-party camera apps on Android. Unlike on iOS, there isn't a vast selection of well-made, nicely-designed camera apps in the Play Store. Sure, there are fairly good ones like Open Camera (opens in new tab), Manual Camera (opens in new tab) and Camera FV-5 (opens in new tab), but Google's lack of a robust camera API puts the onus on phone manufacturers to develop their own drivers and apps. And while most, like Samsung, Huawei, LG and HTC, do a pretty great job, it would be nice to have some more choice.

Your turn

We know you all love to take pictures and we've seen some incredible shots from our community. Share your secrets with everyone in the comments!

Alex Dobie
Executive Editor

Alex was with Android Central for over a decade, producing written and video content for the site, and served as global Executive Editor from 2016 to 2022.

19 Comments
  • Moto Z
    1/3" Sony IMX214 @ 13MP w/ 1.1 micron pixels
    CameraNX with HDR+/Footej/Open Camera (latter 2 for DNGs)
    Adobe Lightroom/Capture One Although I've been using my Sony a6000 more and more ever since getting the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN, alongside using Capture One. It's probably my new main cam.
  • PicSay pro. A must. Sometime run through perfectly clear first. Then if needed to do some more artistic editing I use toolwiz photos. I have a few others I play with too. LG G4 (previously G3 and original Evo4g and Evo LTE)
  • I've had the same Evo 4g, Evo LTE and G3. <High 5>
  • Actually, at this point in time I wouldn't care if a phone does great video and doesn't even have the capability to take photos. I only use my camera for video analysis apps - particularly taking high frame rate video, since dedicated cameras that can do 120-240 FPS are too expensive, still. I pretty much don't take pictures with it, anymore. I've gotten a decent point and shoot (a Sony cost about $350'ish) and use that instead, as it blows every smartphone camera out of the water in literally all environments (except underwater, since it's not waterproofed and I'm not willing to test that). That includes GS8 and iPhone 7 Plus. Went on a trip not long ago and all the smartphone photos were horrible. No details. All the trees etc. looked watercolor, particularly if they were in the background. The P&S yielded picture-frame quality snaps. It wasn't even a comparison. I don't even buy phones for the camera anymore. They don't seem substantially better than 2 year old devices (in some instances, they're actually WORSE), and it will take a few more years for smartphones to catch up with mid-range point-and-shoot cameras, never mind DSLRs. They aren't even in the same stratosphere as a DSLR, yet these companies keep talking as if they are. Even the RAW images from these phones are pretty horrible, IMO. But when I did take images on my phone, I used Pixelmator to edit them on-device, along with the built-in editing tools provided by the device (usually just cropping and straightening... you can't do much else outside of filters with these JPEGs). If your basis for comparison is an $89 point and shoot, then yea... the phone may be better. Anything in the mid range is going to trounce a smartphone, and a DSLR will laugh at it. Smartphones are, IMO, better for video than they are for photos, so that's what I use mine for predominantly. Will probably keep my current phone for 2-3 years. Friend of mine still has an iPhone 6 Plus going strong, and every time I realize how inconsequential these upgrades are becoming, I regret upgrading myself. So I'm going to skip the next iteration or two of smartphone upgrades and save some money :-P
  • I use a little app on an old iPhone 4S that actually makes images look better. Cortex
  • Nothing on mobile compares to my cheap Paintshop Pro + Nik Collection on Windows 10. On Mac I uses Affinity Photo. I just don't find mobile software delivers results comparable, and smartphone screens are too tiny to really see what you're doing if you're prioritizing quality over "this filter works."
  • And I always use the built-in camera software. That which is provided by the OEM. 3rd party apps - particularly on Android - tend to be limited in crucial ways compared to the OEM offering.
  • I use Snap Camera on LOS 14.1 & typically edit either within the social media app or using QuickPic. On the rare occasion I've had to add text to a pic, I've used Snapseed.
  • Stock camera from my S8plus and edit using snapseed or vsco.
  • On my S8 I use the built in camera, either in pro mode or if I automatic. I only use automatic though when want HDR and I turn that on. I save my RAW files for most of my pro shots and move the "processed shot". For editing, I pretty much only use Snapseed right now. Now, I know this is android central but I do have an iPhone 7 plus and I use an app called procamera for all of my photos on it and again use Snapseed to edit them. I upload them all to Google photos so i can have cross platform/cross device access to all of my photos. I have roughly 25k uploaded currently.
  • I always use the standard camera app for taking photos; they only time I haven't done this was when I had a OnePlus One, and I learned my lesson that 3rd party camera apps don't usually work as well. As far as editing Google photos and the Auto setting are my go-to's. However, I've found that I love playing around with the manual settings on my G6 and then editing the raw photo in Snapseed. I love how LG implements manual settings and have found them to be much better than Samsung's in the S8. Actually, this might be controversial but I haven't been very impressed with the S8's camera and I find that the G6 almost always takes better photos.
  • So what you all are saying is you take selfies and them use editing software to faken the picture up. Making yourselves look better than you actually do? Sounds like something a female would do!
  • Says the guy who edit his picture to b&w.
  • snapseed is sufficient to me.
  • I'm using the Moto G5 Plus which has the same camera setup as the Galaxy S7 (so I'm told) only minus the image stabilization. I use Snapseed to edit my pics in order to clean them up and maybe add a thing or two (such as when I design my own music album covers)...
  • Lg g6 is my main phone. I absolutely love snapseed. It's fantastic. Sometimes things like prisma of I wanna get funky. But snapseed is great even for pictures taken with my DSLR.
  • for some spectacular views - RAW+Snapseed. for places cool itself: cardboard camera + sound.
  • Open Camera, simply for the exposure lock button. Then Snapseed for editing works great.
  • I have the S8+ and use the stock camera in Pro mode. I have 1TB of OneDrive space and 115GB of Google Drive space to upload, since I have on Verizon's unlimited plan, this isn't an issue. I also upload them into Lightroom Mobile. On my Surface Pro 3 and my desktop at home, Lightroom automatically downloads them. I can then edit the DNG RAW images as I see fit and then move them on to my 12TB NAS for long term storage. The Google Drive and OneDrive are mostly, "just in case" uploads. You know...just in case I accidentally delete an image that I wanted to keep. I usually keep it set to 4:3 12MP, however, I've been toying with 18.5:9 aspect ratio as well. I still can shoot RAW capture which allows me more flexibility post processing. The only downside is that in Pro mode, the JPG and RAW images are saved to the phone and not to the microSD card. I have a 256GB card, and after I'm done shooting, I move the pics to the SD card, which is more of an annoyance than anything.