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Best Plume Alternatives in 2020

Eero Pro
Eero Pro (Image credit: Samuel Contreras / Android Central)

Plume takes the guesswork out of building a home Wi-Fi network with its software and hardware combination. Many people don't want to pay the subscription fee that comes with Plume or want some more flexibility. As many of us work from home, having a reliable and secure connection is more important than ever. If you want your Wi-Fi to offer more than just a connection, these are some of the best options with extended support.

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Wi-Fi can be confusing with all of the different options available, so for many people, it's worth it to pay for a subscription to be sure things will work the way you expect and that you will have support if it doesn't. If you are looking for a reliable mesh option with included security features for free, Asus' ZenWiFi CT8 (opens in new tab) is an excellent option with dependable coverage and a stylish design. It also works with other Asus AIMesh enabled routers for easy expansion. Nest Wifi (opens in new tab) is another great option that, while it doesn't include specific security software, has a rich ecosystem of compatible Nest smart home accessories.

Eero offers one of the most comprehensive subscription services, with two tiers providing everything from basic security to software to protect your data like a password manager and secure VPN. With the Eero Pro (opens in new tab) you have the option of sticking with a simple Wi-Fi solution with a fast tri-band connection with a trial of Eero Secure.

You can always add the service down the line if you decide you want it, but the beautiful thing about eero's approach is that you don't have to commit to its subscription. This can be great if you are comfortable managing your own security solution, but having the option can be comforting if you think you may need to add profiles for children or less tech-savvy people down the road.

When Samuel is not writing about networking or 5G at Android Central, he spends most of his time researching computer components and obsessing over what CPU goes into the ultimate Windows 98 computer. It's the Pentium 3.