The Android 10 update was a big shift for the operating system. Not only did we get the long-awaited dark mode and important changes to app permissions, Android 10 also marked Google's departure from dessert names and ushered in a new Android logo/brand. Android 10 powered the best Android phones of 2020, and it solidified a year of growth and maturity for the operating system.

Those same principles are being carried over to Android 11. The core user interface and design remains mostly unchanged, but a bunch of smaller tweaks and features help to further refine the platform as a whole.

Ready to learn all about what Android 11 is packing? Here's everything you need to know!

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Google Pixel 4a

Get Android 11 before anyone else

If you want to be among the first to use Android 11, the Pixel 4a is for you. The big draw is its guaranteed software updates and being first-in-line for them as they're released. You're also getting a fantastic rear camera, OLED display, snappy performance, and reliable battery life.

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Is Android 11 available for my phone?

Android 11 Beta 2 on the Pixel 4Source: Hayato Huseman / Android Central

Following months of Developer Previews and Betas, Google launched the final build of Android 11 on September 8, 2020. The update was available for Pixel phones on day one as per usual, and this year, Android 11 was also available on the same day for select handsets from the likes of OnePlus, Xiaomi, OPPO, and Realme.

That's a big step forward for Android updates as a whole, but there's also still plenty of work that's left to be done. Samsung is now starting to roll out One UI 3.0 based on Android 11 to its flagships, but the likes of LG, Motorola, Nokia, Sony, and others are yet to roll out the update.

While that's certainly annoying, we're making things as easy as possible for you by tracking any and all Android 11 updates as we learn more about them.

What's going on with Android 11 on non-Pixel phones?

OxygenOS 11 live backgroundSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central

As noted above, this year's Android update rollout was a bit different compared to past releases. Instead of Pixels being the only phones that were treated to the new software, handsets from other select manufacturers were also treated to Android 11 in some form.

Let's first look at Samsung, which is marketing its Android 11 update as One UI 3.0. Most of the core design principles remain in place, but there is a lot that's new to check out. Samsung's touting things like an improved lock screen, a more customizable always-on display, new accessibility tools, and more. It's currently rolling out to the Galaxy S20, Note 20, and S10 series, and should make its way to older Samsung devices in the coming weeks and months.

We should also mention OxygenOS 11, which is the Android 11 update for OnePlus phones. OxygenOS 11 introduced a major design shift for OnePlus, with the company moving away from its stock Android aesthetic and embracing design elements found in Samsung's One UI interface. We aren't entirely sure how we feel about the change quite yet, but it'll certainly be interesting to see where OnePlus goes from here.

Then there's Xiaomi. The stable MIUI 12 update based on Android 11 is now rolling out to the Mi 10 series and Redmi Note 9 devices, and should make its way to other Xiaomi phones very soon. We've rounded up Xiaomi's Android 11 rollout timeline to make it easier for you to learn when your phone will get the update.

Lastly, we have ColorOS — the custom Android interface used on OPPO smartphones. ColorOS 11 is rolling out now to OPPO devices, and it offers a lot of exciting improvements. In addition to the usual Android 11 goodies, some other highlights include a customizable dark mode, a Super Power Saving Mode to extend battery life, and a new feature called OPPO Relax 2.0 that aims to help you unwind and fall asleep at night.

Have we reviewed Android 11?

Android 11 reviewSource: Harish Jonnalagadda / Android Central

We'll dive into some of Android 11's biggest features below, but before we do any of that, we should address the elephant in the room — is Android 11 any good? The short answer, yes — it is very, very good.

It's understandable that some people may find Android 11 to be boring or not very different from Android 10, but the fact of the matter is that Android no longer needs massive overhauls every single year the way it used to. The core Android experience in 2020 is darn good, and Android 11 elevates it even more. All of the conversation improvements are great for streamlining notifications, more powerful permissions is always something we're happy to see, and the new power button menu adds a ton of extra functionality.

There are a couple of changes we aren't completely in love with (namely the new multitasking window and Suggested Apps feature for the home screen), but those things are easy to overlook. The vast majority of what Google did with Android 11 was for the better, and the end result is software that's more functional and enjoyable to use.

How do Android 11 chat bubbles work?

Android 11 Beta Chat BubbleSource: Joe Maring / Android Central

As mentioned above, there isn't one single overhaul or massive change found with Android 11. Instead, it's a mix of many small tweaks here and there. A few of them focus on improving your messaging experience, with Google offering a lot in this department.

First on the list, we have chat bubbles. Similar to what Facebook's offered for years with its Messenger app on Android, chat bubbles in Android 11 hide your ongoing conversations in little bubbles on the side of your screen. You can move the bubbles around, and tapping on them reveals that specific conversation. The Bubbles API is available for all messaging apps, with Google encouraging developers to adopt it.

In another effort to make sure you can get to your messages as quickly as possible, Android 11 introduces a dedicated conversation section in your notification shade that offers instant access to any ongoing conversations you have. It also makes it easier for your messaging notifications to stand out from other ones, ensuring you never miss an important text ever again.

Speaking of messages and notifications, Android 11 makes it possible to send images when replying to a message directly from the notification shade.

What's new with permissions in Android 11?

Android 11 Beta Permissions PageSource: Joe Maring / Android Central

Looking back on Android 10, one of its highlights was its improved handling of app permissions. Android 10 gave users more control over applications and what they could access, and Android 11 keeps this train rolling with a wonderful new addition.

Now, when an app asks for permission to use sensitive features like your location, microphone, or camera, you can choose to only grant it access on a one-time basis. The app will be able to use that permission during that instance of you using the app, but as soon as you leave it, the permission is revoked. The next time you use the app and it wants to use that permission, it needs to be granted access again.

Giving apps permission to these aspects of your phone should not be taken lightly, so we're thrilled to see Google giving users more control over their data like this.

On the subject of permissions and privacy, we had the opportunity to sit down and talk with Charmaine D'Silva — Product Manager and privacy specialist over at Google. They helped give us a deeper understanding of how some of these features came to be and why they're so important. If you have a few minutes to check it out, it's definitely worth a read.

Does Android 11 have a built-in screen recorder?

Android 11 Screen Recording HeroSource: Andrew Martonik / Android Central

For the past few Android releases, we've been patiently waiting for Google to add a built-in screen recorder. It's not something you'll use every day (if ever for some people), but the fact that such a basic function isn't baked into Android at its core is getting annoying.

Thankfully, Android 11 finally changes that. This version of Android does include the feature, accompanied with a clean UI and toggles for recording audio and showing touches with your recording.

There's not much else to say about this, other than the fact that we're glad we can finally put this feature request to bed.

Is Android 11 compatible with folding phones?

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip Vs Hands On NiraveSource: Nirave Gondhia / Android Central

If there's been a place of notable advancement in the Android space, it's been with displays. Companies are doing what they can to offer the best and most exciting smartphone screen possible, and as great as this is, Android needs to catch up with better support for all of these advancements.

Folding phones are proving to be quite popular so far in 2020, and especially with devices like the Galaxy Z Flip and Motorola RAZR that have the "flip phone" folding design, Android 11 adds the "hinge angle sensor API" so apps can easily detect the hinge of these folding phones. With this information, developers can adapt their apps to work around the hinge and create unique experiences because of that (like how Google Duo changes its UI when you do a half-fold on the Z Flip).

The other big upgrade displays have seen has to do with faster refresh rates. It's no longer uncommon for phones to ship with screens that refresh at 90Hz or 120Hz, and Android 11 allows developers to take better advantage of these powerful displays. Developers can select which refresh rate their services should run at, and if the developer determines their app looks best at 90Hz or 60Hz, they can make that decision and have the phone's display change its refresh rate accordingly when using that app.

How does Android 11 work with 5G?

5G speed testSource: Android Central

5G finally started making its way to people in 2019, and throughout 2020, more and more folks have started connecting to the next generation of wireless data. To ease the transition, Android 11 adds a very important "Dynamic Meterdness API."

That may not sound very exciting on paper, but it essentially allows phones to take full advantage of all the power 5G brings.

If the API detects that you're connected to an unlimited 5G signal, you'll access the highest possible quality for videos and graphics. The potential for 5G is pretty darn cool, and this API ensures you take full advantage of the speeds available to you.

What phone should I get for the best Android 11 experience?

Whether you want to be among the first to get Android 11 or experience it the way Google intended, the Pixel 5 is the phone for you. It's the newest flagship Pixel that's currently available, and if you prefer metal over plastic or glass, it's a hard phone to ignore.

The Pixel 5 is all about delivering a flagship-quality Android experience for a relatively low price, and in these regards, it succeeds tremendously. Google crammed a lot into the Pixel 5, including phenomenal cameras, an OLED display, good performance, long battery life, and more. The design is a little plain, but the phone's also a great size for one-handed use.

Best of all, the Pixel 5 and other Pixel devices get quarterly Feature Drops from Google, bringing new features to the Android 11 experience without requiring a full-scale platform update. The most recent Feature Drop was delivered on December 7, 2020.

Fast updates

Google Pixel 4a

Get Android 11 before anyone else

If you want to be among the first to use Android 11, the Pixel 4a is for you. The big draw is its guaranteed software updates and being first-in-line for them as they're released. You're also getting a fantastic rear camera, OLED display, snappy performance, and reliable battery life.

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