Skip to main content

The Pixel 6 Pro now lets you disable a wireless tech you hardly need

Google Pixel 6 Pro Lockscreen Material You Music
Google Pixel 6 Pro Lockscreen Material You Music (Image credit: Alex Dobie / Android Central)

What you need to know

  • Google has introduced settings toggle for ultra-wideband on the Pixel 6 Pro.
  • The update is part of Google's December 2021 update.
  • UWB allows for more precise positioning, though it works only with devices that have compatible technology.

Google has quietly added new settings that allow you to toggle the Pixel 6 Pro's ultra-wideband capability on and off. This feature is part of Google's December 2021 update, though there aren't many use cases for it right now.

For starters, UWB allows a device to "identify the relative position of nearby devices" that support this wireless technology. That said, its application on Google's best Android phones is currently limited to the Nearby Share feature, which was upgraded following the December 2021 update. However, due to software bugs, that update is currently on hold.

UWB chips also power Google's digital car key feature, which started rolling out in December to select Android devices. However, the feature is currently limited to the Pixel 6 and Samsung Galaxy S21 series, and you need to own specific BMW models to be able to use it. The capability is future-proofed, nevertheless, so it'll be compatible with future devices down the road.

You can manage the hardware capability right now, as spotted by 9to5Google. If you want to access the UWB option, simply head over to the Settings app and then choose "Connection preferences" under the Connected devices section.

Google is expected to resume the December Pixel feature rollout later this month, so the UWB settings toggle will most likely become available to a broader set of users in the coming weeks.

Google Pixel 6 Kinda Coral Render

Google Pixel 6

The Pixel 6 and 6 Pro are already fantastic phones, and you can now use them as a car key, unlocking the car when you get close, which is convenient if you have a full set of hands.

Jay Bonggolto always keeps a nose for news. He is a tech journalist based in the Philippines who has been writing about consumer tech for the past six years and has been using various Android phones since falling in love with Jelly Bean. When he's not writing, he likes to spend time outside, stealing scenes with his phone camera.