Headlines

2 years ago

Samsung Galaxy Note arriving in the UK November 17

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Samsung has announced that its beastly Galaxy Note smartphone will be hitting British stores from November 17. The Note, which was announced around a month ago at Sammy's Unpacked event at IFA, is the most impressive Samsung phone to appear on European shores. It sports a dual-core Exynos CPU at 1.4GHz (up from the 1.2GHz chip in the Galaxy S II), along with a full gigabyte of RAM and a massive 5.3-inch, 1280x800 SuperAMOLED HD display. Samsung's promoting the phone as the ultimate note-taking device for business professionals, as it also comes with a pressure-sensitive stylus that can be used anywhere within the UI.

No word on price points just yet, and none of the UK networks have announced any deals to carry the device, either. That said, you can probably expect to have to part with £500 or more to get your hands on this monstrous piece of technology. Join us after the jump for Samsung's full press release.

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2 years ago

Official Hotmail app now available in the Android Market

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Microsoft has released its official Hotmail app for Android, available now (finally!) in the Android Market. For the Hotmail faithful, the native Android experience has been far from perfect, so an optimized app is welcome and overdue news. You'll get push email, synced contacts and calendar, folder support, and even the ability to sync multiple Hotmail accounts. Grab the app for free after the break.

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2 years ago

Official Washington Post app lands in the Android Market

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The Washington Post has finally launched an official app for Android and is available for free from the Android Market. Fans of the popular paper can now read their favorite columnists on-the-go in a native app rather than being forced to go to the website.

Here are the main features:

  • Breaking news alerts
  • A dedicated photo section that includes galleries and photo essays
  • Metro, traffic and weather info for local users in the CD metro area. The metro alerts include real-time arrival times and the traffic info allows you to view live traffic cams to see which route to take. (If you've ever been in DC at rush hour, you'll know how important this is)
  • Ability to share articles easily by SMS, email or to Twitter, Google+ or Facebook

It took a long-time for a dedicated Washington Post app to come to Android, but it seems it was worth the wait. The app provides a really nice experience for those seeking easy access to articles and news from their mobile device. As mentioned above, it is available for free from the Android Market, see the links after the break. If you have questions or concerns about the app, see our Android App Forum.

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2 years ago

Google to announce Q3 earnings Oct. 13

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Who doesn't love a good earnings call, right? Google's set its Q3 2011 call for 1:30 p.m. Pacific time Oct. 13. It'll be streamed, we'll undoubtedly get some Android news, and we'll be listening in to bring it all to you.

Source: Google

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2 years ago

Chromium web browser gets files that support a build for Android

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Chromium, the open-source version of Google's Chrome web browser, got an interesting bit of code checked in a few days ago -- files and scripts that support a build for Android.  While normally we wouldn't get too excited seeing an upstream check-in about Android in an open-source project, this time the submission is from a Google employee.  Google took extra time to let everyone at Google I/O 2011 know that Android and Chrome were two separate entities, and everyone got the impression that the two would never meet.  We sure did, and discussed it ourselves over a beer or two.

Of course, things change -- maybe Google has decided that a merger of the Android browser code and the Chrome browser code would benefit everyone, and the open-source version would be the best place to do it.  Or maybe these are just files for the DIY'ers out there to build their own version of Chromium for Android.  Either way, the full Chrome browser on my Galaxy Tab is something I've been wanting.  Maybe, just maybe, this is the first step.

Source: Chromium via Conceivably Tech

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2 years ago

Google Apps have a new download location -- GetJar?

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They say seeing is believing, but I'm still not sure what to make of this one.  Google's closed applications -- the ones they keep a tight rein on and not allow just anybody to use -- apparently are available through the third-party market GetJar.  Not just Gmail that you see pictured above, but Google TV remote, Maps, Search, Books -- they're all there.  We're assuming that this is legitimate and not a mistake (GetJar is a reputable site), but we're baffled at how this came to be -- especially since Google's apps also need additions to the Android system framework to actually run.  I can tell you that they work (I tested with Google Music and YouTube -- can't afford to wipe out my Gmail app just yet), but I can't tell you why.  Hit the link and give it a try yourself.

Source: GetJar

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2 years ago

Hacks bring Google Wallet to all Nexus S phones

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NFC may or may not be the future of on-the-go banking, but for most Android fans it's pretty damn cool.  That's why there was a whole lot of disappointment when Google decided to go exclusive with Sprint and the Nexus S 4G on the Google Wallet app for Android, leaving the majority of Nexus S users out of the picture.  This likely has something to do with money (it always does), Isis mobile payment, and competition, but we don't really care about any of that -- we just want to play with our NFC chip.

Now we can, thanks to hacks.  Users have found that the files included in the Sprint version of the Nexus S 4G work just fine on other Nexus S phones -- both stock and with custom ROMs.  Installation is easy enough (though you do need to be rooted and/or running a custom recovery), just flash a package or move a few files.

There's a big caveat here, however. While it's cool that we're able to circumvent the restrictions of exactly who gets to use this, we're not so sure Google and MasterCard will be happy with the $10 credits people who aren't eligible are getting.  If you want to try it for yourself, though, check out the links below.

Source: XDA; (custom ROMs), (stock ROMs)

Thanks, John!

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2 years ago

Adobe's Touch Apps sure look sweet

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Adobe's cracking through its first-day Adobe Max keynote today. And while we were teased with the Photoshop Touch SDK in the spring, we're now getting down to brass tacks. The promo video above gives you an idea of what's going on. And while things are always ideally edited in promo videos, you get a sense of what's in store. We're talking full digital content creation on Android (and iOS) devices. And as we type this, we're watching a Photoshop Touch demo being done not on an iPad, but on Honeycomb. Android, folks.

Exciting times, indeed.

Source: Adobe; More Watch the keynote live

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2 years ago

Android App Review: Smartr Contacts Beta

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Sometimes your contact list just gets large. It happened to me and I'm still not quite sure how. You get an email here, exchange some business cards, and boom, before you know it, your contact list is overflowing with people. If you're struggling to keep track of all your contacts and are interested in how you stay in touch with them, Xobni's new Smartr Contacts is the app for you.

Upon opening Smartr Contacts, you're asked to either log in or sign up. Once you've done that, you can move to the account linking process. Essentially, Smartr Contacts pulls contact and calendar information from your Google account, sorts everyone, adds a picture to their profile, and tries to make sense of why you've contacted them in the first place.

You can also log in to social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn to see more detailed information about your contacts. Otherwise, you're limited to three of the four tabs available whenever you choose a contact.

The details tab will show you all of the different contact methods you have with a particular contact. If you only have their email, that's all you see. If you've got their email and a few phone numbersthat's what you'll see. Details is basically the standard contact information.

History is perhaps the most interesting of the four, showing you how many times you contacted this person, when your initial contact was, and what the subject was. Additionally, a list of emails, calls, and text messages details your timeline with this person, starting with most recent.

The common tab shows you what people you've got in common. If you email a colleague often and this colleague works with other people you know, they'll show up here. Otherwise, it'll either be empty or have you (if you keep yourself in your address book).

If you slide the screen once to the right you'll see your Google Calendar events. Smartr Contacts will put a profile picture (of your contact) on any event you're going to that another one of your contacts is going to. It's kind of cool, if you don't mind going into this app to see your calendar.

Smartr Contacts can also show you who your top contacts are, in case you didn't already have some idea. You can see top 10, 40, 100, or 200+ and email, call, or text anyone straight from this menu.

Smartr Contacts Beta is free in the Android Market, so if you're itching to know more about your contacts than you ever wish you had, we've got download links and more pictures after the break.

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2 years ago

Editorial: Android is the new Linux -- and that's a great thing

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Recently, a popular website ran an editorial about how Android was turning into the new Linux, and just how awful a thing that was.  The author was half right -- Android is turning out to be the new Linux.  If he had stopped there, he and I would see eye-to-eye, and this rebuttal would have never happened.  He also would have gotten far fewer pageviews.  He goes on to discuss patents and other issues that don't really explain his position before he comes to the meat of his issue -- fragmentation.  You know, that buzzword that's ever so popular in any hit-piece about Android.  I'm here to tell you what I think about fragmentation, Linux, Android, and how it all fits together after the break.

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