According to Sydsvenskan.se, Sony Ericsson turned down the opportunity to build the Nexus One. We knew that Sony Ericsson didn't want to sell their phones through google.com/phone, but to turn down the opportunity to build the premier Android phone? Yep, that's how it went down according to SE CEO Bert Nordberg.

We guess we can kind of, sort of understand why Sony Ericsson didn't want to build the Nexus One, especially if their end goal is to push their own UI over Android. If they want a consistent model for their phone lineup, building one for Google wouldn't have fulfilled that. But even with that explanation, it's very shortsighted to not want to partner up with Google for Google's Android on Google's phone. The Nexus One clearly has a leg up on the competition (it runs Android 2.1), who wouldn't want to make that phone now?

We're actually more surprised that Google asked Sony Ericsson in the first place. HTC had been such a wonderful partner for Google and Android and was fully capable of building a stellar device (as proven by the actual Nexus One itself), that it's almost shocking that Google would approach another phone manufacturer. To us, HTC exemplifies what we want in a handset. It was a no brainer for HTC to build the Nexus One and we're happy it ended up that way.

And maybe Sony Ericsson could build a device as awesome as HTC built the Nexus One, but then it probably wouldn't be available until April. What do you guys think about Sony Ericsson turning down Google?

[via engadget]

 
There are 7 comments

rufflez says:

Probably a good thing. If they agreed, it probably still would not have been released.

barnettj says:

I agree with Casey & Rufflez. This time next year, we would still be looking at leaked photos and wondering what carrier it would be on.

tkfox007 says:

I can see why they would go with Sony, they're practically the leader in consumer electronics. But yeah, good thing Sony turned it down, Cause the Nexus One would be the Never-coming-out One.

barnettj says:

I thought I was being a little harsh. The X10 was the only SE phone I had followed. I really don't know much about their past releases. But apparently their reputation also comes from devices past. Its a shame too. The X10 looks like a sweet phone.

I am not surprised that Google offered another of its manufacturing partners in the Open Handset Alliance an opportunity to bid on the Nexus One. I would have been more surprised if they had not shown the specs to SonyEriccson, Motorola, HTC, etc. I suggest to you that HTC made the best response to Google for launching the first Nexus. But keep in mind that Motorola has already stated that they plan a Google DTC (direct to consumer) phone in 2010. I suggest that we will see the Nexus Two by the Fall 2010. I am not aware of SonyEricsson's policy on SIM free devices, if it has one. Perhaps SonyEricsson, unlike HTC, viewed their relationship with the "monopolists"--the US network operators---as too important to be seen to be helping Google with a revolutionary distribution model that the US consumer would benefit by. Politics? Can only speculate.

Comments?

whew, sounds like a close call. Glad it worked out the way it did. HTC went above and beyond and built one of the the best devices out right now. Kudos to them!

parishyoung says:

I think it makes sense for Google to have gone to a selection of manufacturer's. If each "Nexus" handset is released by a different manufacturer then Google gets to work closely with them and they get to have the limelight in the Android arena for a while, which will also allow them to help sell their own Android handsets.

HTC was a good choice though, especially when we look at the end result - the Nexus One.

Don't forget that only a few years ago networks / carriers were selling HTC hardware with their own brands - for example the Orange SPV range, or the O2 XDA, or T-Mobile MDA, etc.