What you need to know

  • Samsung and Xiaomi were the two big gainers in the European smartphone market in Q2 2019.
  • Samsung's market share increased to 40.6% in Europe in the second quarter of 2019.
  • Xiaomi shipped 4.3 million smartphones in European markets in Q2 2019, a growth of 48% over the same period last year.

Samsung's revamped Galaxy A series of phones has helped the company to significantly increase its market share in the European market. According to data from Canalys, Samsung's market share surged to its highest in over five years during the second quarter of 2019.

Samsung, which shifted its focus to regaining lost market share this year, managed to grab a 40.6% share of the European smartphone market and shipped a total of 18.3 million smartphones in the second quarter. The top-shipping smartphone in Europe in Q2 2019 was the Galaxy A50, with shipments of 3.2 million units. Samsung's Galaxy A40 was the second-highest shipped smartphone in Europe during the April-June period, while the budget-friendly Galaxy A20e occupied the fourth position.

Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi remained the fourth-largest smartphone vendor in Europe in Q2 2019 but managed to increase its market share from 2.9% during the same period last year to 9.6%. The most popular Xiaomi smartphone in Europe during the April-June quarter was the Redmi Note 7.

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Two million units of the budget Android smartphone were shipped in Europe in Q2 2019, putting it at No.3 in the list of top-shipping smartphones. Canalys believes the company's early foray into 5G also played an important role in making it more popular in European markets and building new operator partnerships.

Huawei's market share slipped from 22.4% in Q2 2018 to 18.8% during the same period this year, mainly due to it being added to the U.S. Entity List in May. The company was still ahead of Apple, which shipped 6.4 million smartphones and grabbed 14.1% share of the European smartphone market.

Samsung's Q2 2019 profit falls by a staggering 56% after weak memory demand