Android Central

Truly unlimited mobile data is something of a rarity in the UK, so imagine our delight when the Full Monty plan first appeared from T-Mobile. No fair usage limits, and perhaps best of all, all variants of the Full Monty included free and unlimited tethering. Now though, it seems T-Mo UK is quickly backtracking on their "truly unlimited" moniker and taking away tethering from the package.

Speaking to Techradar, a T-Mobile spokesperson had the following to say: 

"From 8th August, tethering is not permitted for new customers under the terms and conditions of the Full Monty.

"We have a range of smartphone and mobile broadband plans that include tethering for customers who want to stay connected on other devices."

So as of yesterday tethering is no more. The spokesperson also declined to comment further on why the U-turn had come about. As it stands now, Three UK once again looks like the best deal to be had, with their One plan still offering unlimited data and inclusive tethering. With Everything Everywhere -- the T-Mobile/Orange UK partnership -- looking to try and offer LTE before the year end, removing tethering from their flagship plan is sure to be a bitter blow to those who may have been holding out. 

Source: Techradar

 
There are 10 comments

icebike says:

Truly unlimited and tethering is an economically un-sustainable offer.
One or the other, but not both.

Throw in LTE and you've given away the store.
Why they offered this combination in the first place is the question.

Three manage it just fine though. And they're the smallest of the major 5 carriers in the UK. And currently offer some of the best speeds on HSPA too. Three have offered it for a lot longer than TMo as well

hoosiercub says:

I love it when people say that it's unsustainable, like data is some sort of finite resource. With proper network backing and maintenance it's perfectly sustainable. If you're a wireless service provider, and you care about your customers, you care about your network. Taking care of, improving, and expanding your network gives you a good reputation with your user base. Doing so keeps things in fluid motion rather than companies like here in the US with Sprint. Their network has been crap for years, and finally they're getting around to "fixing & improving" their 3G CDMA network, which is going out as LTE is coming in.

icebike says:

Its not sustainable in the economic sense.

You can't charge enough to support truly unlimited data over LTE, because LTE is capable of supporting an entire household full of tablets computers, etc. If you allow tethering essentially end up letting people tie a tower slot 24/7.

You fundamentally fail to understand that tower time slots are a limited resource. As is bandwidth for the last mile, as is room to build more towers.

Each tower can only support so many phones. Tie up a tower time slot with a permanent full throttle LTE data stream, then another, then 40 then 280, and soon nobody can connect.

You can't wish into existence more towers. They take years to plan, permit, provision, and one other thing... what was, it... Oh yeah PURCHASE!.

But you can' purchase a tower from the revenue of 1000 users, yet with full throttle 24/7 data connections, 1000 users can pretty much utilize all the time slots on even a fairly substantial urban tower.

The entire infrastructure was designed around intermittent connections.

Things like streaming impose more load on the tower than JUST the bandwidth they consume. They manage to tie up an entire time slot, with fairly low-data rate. (This is why Google Music is way less infrastructure impact than Pandora. Google music is not a true streamer. It downloads the entire song, as well as the next song(s), then shuts down the radio until it needs more. You can start a play list, or album, give it a minute, then pop to airplane mode and the music keeps going for a while).

ravyn80 says:

FINALLY someone who speaks common sense. I've tried and tried to explain this to people, but no one understands. They always pull up the line, "I've got a bunch of land they can use!" Not that simple folks.

Of course, no one wants to hear common sense anymore.

Now, on to T-Mo, they should've known that unlimited tether/data was unsustainable on their towers, financial wise. They're setting themselves up for the same thing that AT&T did when they introduced the original iPhone. That was fun time.

Also, the person who mentioned 3.... I think you answered your own question. They're the smallest company there? Probably why they offer the most. If they ever get a lot bigger, then they will back off on truly unlimited.

Vyrlokar says:

In my country (Spain) doing such a thing would mean that they forfeit their early termination fees on contracts, as it's no longer what you signed in for.

Mind you, here in Spain, there is no true unlimited data. You can have unlimited data, but throttled past X MBs, or you can have X MBs of prepaid data, and then Y/MB afterwards. Tethering is allowed by default in the smaller operators (Yoigo, MVNOs), and is either reserved to the ultra-expensive plans or as an add on charge for the large operators (Movistar, Orange, Vodaphone).

Still, the large operators are bleeding customers at an alarming rate since they decided to end carrier subsidies on new phones, while having 5x more expensive prices than the smaller ones.

icebike says:

That's the same here. If they change the contract, you get an out on your ETF.

Even in the quote in Richard's story, they said this applies to NEW customers, so I suspect they don't want to eat too many EFTs.

Here in the US, T-Mo is pretty aggressive about shedding non-economic customers and they have enough contract zinger clauses to do it.

My son moved to a new apartment that caused his phone to roam from t-mo onto At&T towers most of the time. After a few months, T-mobile invoked the too much roaming clause due to more than 50% of his time was spent off of their network. He was simply given the boot, and told to find a different carrier.

Since April 2012, T-Mobile has tightened this even further.

Incitatus says:

THIS is the sole reason I felt the need to root my SG3 out of the box. I use one or the other, my phone or tablet through the phone. Greed is the only reason providers feel the need to double dip customers.

crxssi says:

Greed is part of it, but people who abuse unauthorized tethering is also a part of it. This is not like a wired cable modem infrastructure... there is a very finite available amount of bandwidth on each tower, and just a few people doing crazy transfers on a tower can ruin it for everyone on that tower.

And now that LTE is so fast, it is even possible for a few overloaded towers to overwhelm the backhaul and ruin it for many, many other towers in the area, too.

ravyn80 says:

That is also the reason the carriers are getting rid of unlimited data left and right. When people are abusing what they have, it hurts everyone else down the line. The more you use the less someone else has to use, therefore other person complains. Keep going and you have a whole lot of people complaining because a few people are abusing the tower.