Headlines

2 years ago

Samsung Galaxy Note commercial availability announced, hits European markets first

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Back when Samsung unveiled their 5.3-inch, dual-core Galaxy Note with a SuperAMOLED HD display they never mentioned when, exactly anyone would be able to pick one up. Now though, Samsung has finally announced the commercial availability of the Galaxy Note, which will go on sale in European markets starting with Germany on October 29.

Launching with Android 2.3 and a 1.4 GHz dual core processor you'll also get a massive 2500 mAh battery to power that 1280x800 SuperAMOLED HD display, HSPA+ data as well as the 8MP rear camera and 2MP front-facing shooter.

And we can't forget the S Pen, which is included with the Galaxy Note. The Galaxy Note supports screenshot-taking and annotation across all areas of the UI using the S Pen and its technology, which Samsung will be offering an SDK for eventually.

Source: Samsung

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2 years ago

Raider in Canada, Pwned by the RAZR! [From the Forums]

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With all the talk of exclusivity and such, let me just say.. this post is exclusive to Android Central. With that out the way -- plenty of Android news happned already today so make sure you get caught up either here on the blogs or in the exclusive Android Central forums. Also, stay tuned for the Greatest Android Podcast in the world.

If you're not already a member of the Android Central forums, you can register your account today.

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2 years ago

Intel CEO Paul Otellini to give keynote at CES; will we see a new generation of Android hardware?

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It's 50-50 on this one, we suppose, but Intel CEO Paul Otellini will be giving a keynote address on the first afternoon of CES on January 10 in Las Vegas. And it's entirely possible that we'll see some new Android hardware come out of it. You'll recall that Google's Andy Rubin joined Otellini at Intel's developer conference last month to announce that "Combining Android with Intel's low power smartphone roadmap opens up more opportunity for innovation and choice." And that goes from the kernel on up.

Needless to say, this won't be a CES to miss, and we'll be there to bring you the whole thing.

Source: Press release

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2 years ago

Motorola shipped 4.8 million smartphones, just 100,000 Xoom tablets in Q3

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Motorola Mobility just announced its third-quarter 2011 earnings, dropping word that it shipped 4.8 million smartphones for the three months ending Sept. 30. It also said it shipped 100,000 Xoom Honeycomb tablets. By comparison, it shipped 3.8 million smartphones in Q3 2010, The Xoom wasn't available until 2011, but consider that Motorola said it shipped 440,000 of them in the second quarter. That's quite the drop.

Moto also give an update regarding its merger with Google, but didn't do much more than just repeat that shareholders will vote on the deal Nov. 17, and that it's all contingent on passing legal muster in the U.S., Europe, Canada, China, Israel, Russia, Taiwan and Turkey, and that the whole deal could be final by the end of 2011, or in early 2012. Motorola's attributing $18 million in expenses to the merger.

No conference call this quarter. Too bad. They're usually pretty juicy. Hit the link below for all the financial nitty gritty.

Source: Motorola

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2 years ago

Carrier IQ named 'company under $100M to watch' -- and users don't even get a thank-you

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Market research firm IDC has named Carrier IQ -- a name that provokes a cringe or two -- one of the "companies to watch" for analytics groups under $100 million in revenue.  Because it sells away data about your phone use -- telling your carrier what apps you use, how you use them, and when you use them -- we don't like it much around these parts.  It's sneaky -- and sneaky is bad.  How the whole deal works is that the carriers pay to have an app installed on the shiny new phone you bought, and it runs in the background.  The data it sends helps carriers and manufacturers work together to focus improving and innovating the things that folks like you and I use most often.  It saves them money, and makes you want to buy their next product by making Sense 4.0 do the things that users often do in a new (and hopefully better) way than Sense 3.0 did.  Doesn't sound so bad, does it?  Read on.

It's not inherently evil, at least on the surface.  A carrier eats some of the cost of a phone when they sell it to you subsidized, and users get to enjoy the $200 they saved.  But things get a little dicey when you consider who really owns the phone you just paid $299 for and signed two years of your contract life away for at the mall.  They tell you up front that they are tracking usage and sending off data about you, but you're not given notice (or a chance to decline) until after the money has been spent.  It's like buying a new TV and finding out that Channel 2 has been switched to the Best Buy News Network when you get home and hook it up.  You can pack it back up and pay a restocking fee, or shake your head and accept it.  Combine all this with the fact that you don't get a break on your monthly bill with most carriers if you opt-out of buying their phones, or that some carriers won't even let you use phones that they don't control, it things take a turn for the worse.  And when bugs appear, things turn from worse to FUBAR.

Before anyone jumps in and says "justrootyourphone," that's not the solution.  My mother can't, won't, and shouldn't have to root the phone to keep her information a little more private and keep others from profiteering from her.  And that solution pretty much goes out the window when you consider she has a Nokia feature phone, which you can't just "root" -- yes, this problem goes beyond Android.  What to do?  Buy an iPhone or a Nexus.  Or just accept what's happening and stop feeling indignant about it, because it's not going away any time soon.

More: BusinessWire

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2 years ago

Verizon's exclusive Galaxy Nexus exclusive no more?

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Seriously, this is the last time we're going to write about this Verizon-Galaxy Nexus exclusivity thing. But it's worth noting that Verizon's removed the "Exclusively from Verizon" line from its little banner image, which really only means that something that wasn't actually exclusive in the first place apparently still isn't exclusive. Make sense? No? Fine. Read this again.

Source: Verizon; via Phandroid

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2 years ago

Galaxy Nexus hits Europe Nov. 17, elsewhere thereafter

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We're at Samsung's World Tour event in London, and word just got passed that the Galaxy Nexus will be available on Nov. 17, and acrosst the globe shortly thereafter. It's unclear if that means the U.S. as well, with Verizon's "exclusive" and all. Stay tuned.

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2 years ago

C Spire's Motorola Milestone X gets its Android 2.3 update, too

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If you're making use of a Motorola Milestone X on CSpire we have some good news for you all. Yesterday, the carrier started to roll out an Android 2.3 Gingerbread update to the device which has been long awaited. Most users should get an update notification but if not just go to: Home>Menu> Settings>About Phone>System Updates

After that, you should find the update available for download and installation. Once updated, you'll find all the normal Android 2.3 goodies as well, a newer version of Blur.

Source: CSpire; Thanks, StromTrooper626!

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2 years ago

Google+ expands to Gapps

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Finally, Google has opened up Google+ to Gapps users. That means if your sole Google account (and we do realize there are some of you out there) is run through Google Apps, you can now use that account for Google+. You'll have the same features as everyone else, and the ability to share with everyone on your domain, even if you haven't added them all to a circle. Very cool.

Source: Google Enterprise blog

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2 years ago

Android Quick App: Open Sea

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Who hasn't dreamed of being Moses, parting the Red Sea, right? Just us? No matter. With Open Sea, that's exactly what you do. You're "Mo" (get it?), the "prophetic leader" who "urges people to flee across the sea ... by foot."

Gameplay's pretty simple. You've got several sections of sea you need to move out of the way. Tap, and begone! It does get a little trickier, with multiple groups of follwers making the trek, and mummies and other obstacles getting in the way. But you can strike back as well, and hopefully take a little less an 40 years to get things done.

Open Sea is available as an abreivated "lite" version or as a 99-cent download. We've got hands-on video and download links to the paid version after the break.

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