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Microsoft launches beta version of Skype for Web

Microsoft has unveiled Skype for Web, a browser-based version of the VOIP service. Currently in beta, Skype for Web functions just like its native desktop counterpart, with voice and video calling and text messaging. The beta is available for Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Firefox on Windows, and Safari 6.0 or later on OS X.

In order to use the Skype for Web beta, you will need to download a plug-in before your first call, although Microsoft is working on removing this requirement at some point in the future. Being a beta, there are some issues present in this initial form. Known issues include increased battery consumption on OS X, as well as increased time to connect when placing an outgoing video call.

Invites for the beta will roll out over the next few months. Some new and existing Skype users are already receiving theirs. To check your invite status, simply sign in with your Skype account on the Skype website.

Source: Skype (opens in new tab)

20 Comments
  • I'm surprised this wasn't the first version of Skype since it's inception. Posted via the Android Central App
  • HTML5 has come a long way and Skype has been around a long time. Posted from my Motorola Moto G.
  • I'm amazed that they actually permit using Chrome for this Beta as usually whenever you try to do stuff with Microsoft they demand you to use IE lol.
  • It's a way for them to get the "Chromebook" users to use Skype....but since it needs a plug-in that will happen in the future most likely when that's not required anymore.
  • It's funny because IE doesn't support WebRTC yet...
  • They do? Really? When? What? Specifics please.
  • Requiring a plug-in pretty much defeats the purpose of putting this on the web.
  • The article said that Microsoft is working on removing the plug-in requirement. Posted via Android Central App
  • Uhm, how is this a beta? Skype for the internet (web) has been around for years... Of course it's been crappy beta for years to but still... Posted via Android Central App
  • Do you really not know what this article is about? Posted from my Motorola Moto G.
  • So, what is the big hype? Ok, they want Skype to work in a browser but it woll not be a web application until it is OS agnostic. Nice try, but it is really chasing their own tail. Lots of acticity with no real progress.
  • Is anyone having an issue in android lollipop where, it shows apps you already closed? Posted via the Android Central App
  • You may have closed the app but didn't stop it. You might try pressing the open app button and then use the close all sweet itch inside the chain nger. Posted via the Android Central App
  • Why they need a plug-in?
    Any browser supporting webrtc, like Chrome, does not need any plugin to do VoIP or VideoIP!
    I don't need any stupid plugin in my browser, just use webrtc!
  • Stupid IE doesn't support webRTC.
    As a web developer having to deal with this shit on a daily basis, I say: BURN IE, BURN Burn again
    Oh, and take Safari with you while you're at it
  • >"The beta is available for Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Firefox on Windows, and Safari 6.0 or later on OS X." Linux??? Typical. And I would hardly call this "for web" since anything requiring a plugin means it has NOTHING to do with the web. Web=html. It is just Intenet based.
  • This is only a beta. Actually it sounds more like an alpha. Hopefully they get it working in HTML5 only and then it will work on anything. Now that HTML5 is finally certified, maybe more developers will utilize it to bring more and more useful apps to the web, and thus Linux ;) Posted from my Motorola Moto G.
  • Skype crashes utilizing ART. That doesn't bode well for L.
  • Skype is too heav6of an application, maybe they should fix that first. Plus why was this no make years ago. Facebook msger or hangout works for me. Posted via the Android Central App
  • You should be able to choose whatever app, service or program you like to communicate with someone. That's why Matrix.org (http://matrix.org/) is open source and creating a new open standard for interoperable Instant Messaging and VoIP. Our aim to make VoIP/IM as universal and interoperable as email. You should be able to choose your favourite app and still be able to communicate with friends using competing apps and services.