Sony Music Unlimited

Sony's Music Unlimited streaming service is being updated today to offer high-quality 320 kbps AAC music on all platforms, including Android. The service, which offers unlimited (go figure) music streaming for the monthly price of $9.99, is hoping to persuade users to try it over competing services like Spotify and Rdio. 320 kbps AAC is generally regarded as a high enough quality streaming that general users won't notice the difference between it and locally stored files, but also keeps data usage from streaming reasonably low.

You can download the Music Unlimited app from the Play Store link above, and there is currently a 14 day free trial available when you sign up. The higher quality audio may be enough to have more users trying this service going forward.

320kbps AAC Streaming Playback Now Available for PlayStation 3, Android Smartphones and Tablets, and PCs

FOSTER CITY, California, Jan. 29, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Sony Network Entertainment International today announced that the company's Music Unlimited service now offers users the ability to listen to high quality audio through the service's PC (Windows® and Mac OS®), Sony Xperia™ and other Android™ smartphones and tablets, Sony Android Walkman®, and PlayStation®3 (PS3™) computer entertainment system applications.  By turning on the high quality streaming option in Music Unlimited's settings menu, songs will playback in pristine 320 kbps AAC high fidelity audio.
Sony Entertainment Network's Music Unlimited service is a cloud-based digital music service that hosts a global catalog of over 18 million licensed songs(1) and is available on a wide range of Sony and non-Sony connected devices including any personal computer (including Windows and Mac OS), iOS devices including iPhone® and iPod touch®, Android devices including Sony Xperia smartphones and tablets, as well as the PS3, PlayStation®Vita, and connected Sony BRAVIA HDTVs as well as various Sony home audio and video devices.

The new feature, which is now live on the PS3, Android smartphone and tablet, Android Walkman, and web apps, will be added to other devices compatible with the Music Unlimited service later this year.

Additional information about Sony Entertainment Network can be found by visiting: blog.sonyentertainmentnetwork.com, www.facebook.com/sonyentertainment, and www.twitter.com/sonyentnet. 

(1) Number of tracks available from this catalog varies by country and may be less.

 
There are 7 comments

icebike says:

Quote: "320 kbps AAC is generally regarded as a high enough quality streaming that general users won't notice the difference between it and locally stored files"

From my research, at 320kbps, the AAC codec produces a result that may well be indistinguishable from CD quality for most listeners most of the time with almost all music. Its way better than MP3 at this bitrate.

No point in trying any tests with my ageing ears, but those who have good ears generally can't reliably tell 320k AAC from CDs in blind tests.

I wish Google Play music would switch to AAC.

Miths says:

I tried it briefly last year but there was no offline option like Spotify has. Not a big problem most of the time, but I'm not going to pay for a music service I can't use when I'm out of 3G range (or on my tablet) when I could be - and am - spending that money on a Spotify subscription instead.

And yes, it would be more correct to say that 320 kbit makes sound quality almost indistinguishable from CD (I've made direct comparisons between 320 kbit rips and the original CDs on a pretty expensive headphone setup, and any very minor differences I heard may well have been my imagination) than similar to "locally stored files" (which will also typically range in bitrate from 128 to 320 kbit, in fact I doubt most people rip CDs in bitrates higher than 256k).

jonoave says:

I think Sony has an offline option now.

What kinda case is that in the article picture? Is that on a Nexus 4?

Westoncreg says:

Hey being this is sorta on topic, I'm going to be switching to android from windows phone to let that os mature a bit any idea when Xbox music will hit the android store if at all anymore?

these little tweaks do little to offset the stagnant Sony tech culture... The first sentence of the initial Sony Entertainm​ent Network announcement email I got from Sony: Now you can buy games, movies, and more on the web!

great lead-off if it were sent in 2001, but 2013??

the last sentence is 'Not currently available on mobile devices'

the slow Sony death spiral is actually kinda fun to watch....Couldn't happen to nicer people