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6 days ago

At just $20 you won't be afraid to try some tricks with this mini drone

9

Our friends at Thrifter are back again, this time with a great deal on a mini drone!

Update: This popular deal is back again with a new coupon code. Be sure to use code AUDRONE1 at checkout for the savings!

Right now you can pick up Aukey's mini-drone for just $20.39 at Amazon with coupon code AUDRONE1, a savings of just under $10. You can control this drone with your smartphone, allowing you to fly it just about anywhere, and once you get good at flying it you can even start performing some tricks as well. It takes off and lands easily with just a single tap, and the controls are super responsive so you won't have to worry about delays. It comes with two extra sets of propellers, just in case you happen to crash and break one.

Being so small you can pack in just about any bag so you can keep it with you at all times. Remember to use coupon code AUDRONE1 for the full savings. Will you be learning to fly with Aukey's drone? Let us know in the comments!

See at Amazon

For more great deals on tech, gadgets, home goods and more, be sure to check out our friends at Thrifter now!

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6 days ago

Best Android Phone Under $100

It's possible to get a decent Android experience, even on a shoestring — and unsurprisingly Motorola dominates this field.

Best overall

Moto G Play (with ads)

See at Amazon

The Amazon-exclusive Moto G Play is a $150 phone reduced to $100. The catch? You'll get ads and offers from the retail giant on your lock screen, which may or may not be a deal-breaker depending on how you like to use your phone. (We've got a good breakdown of what it means here).

Otherwise, you're getting a decent entry-level Android phone for not a lot of money at all. The Moto G Play (a.k.a. Moto G4 Play) packs the same soft-touch polycarbonate body as its big brother, the Moto G4, and runs a Snapdragon 410 processor, which has plenty of power to run Android 6.0 Marshmallow on a 5-inch 720p display. There's a reasonable 16GB of storage, expandable via microSD, and an 8-megapixel camera that handles the basics well.

Bottom line: Putting up with lock screen ads allows you to get a $150 phone for $100. It's not perfect, but it's a lot better than you'd otherwise get for the cash.

One more thing: It's unlocked, so you can use it on any carrier of your choice. And if you know where to look, there are some places on the Internet that'll help you take care of those pesky ads.

Why the Moto G Play is best

Amazon plugs the price gap with offers on your lock screen.

With ads from Amazon, or without ads from Verizon, the Moto G Play gets you a great core Android experience — fast software, thanks to Motorola's hands-off approach towards customization, and decent specs all-round.

It's not the flashiest or showiest smartphone, with a relatively generic design, but you don't expect pizzaz when you're paying less than a Benjamin for a full-featured smartphone. Same deal with bonus features like water resistance and swappable backs, like you might get from last year's Moto G (third generation).

Instead, the Moto G Play is just a solid all-round phone for not a lot of cash.

Best ad-free

Moto E LTE

See at Amazon

The unlocked Moto E LTE can be used on any supported network, and doesn't come with any of the bloatware you'd expect from the U.S. carriers. And better still, it's only $81. It's powered by the same Snapdragon 410 chip that's inside the Moto G Play, however you do lose a few important features compared to that phone — a smaller 4.5-inch screen with a less impressive qHD (960x540) display. And there's only 8GB of storage, so an SD card will be an essential purchase.

Bottom line: You're getting less phone than a Moto G Play, but also at a lower price without bloatware, carrier locks or ads.

One more thing: You'll definitely want to snap up a microSD card.

Best on Verizon

Moto G Play Droid

See at Verizon

If you're settled on Verizon as your carrier of choice, you can get the Moto G Play (Droid) for $85 without the need to see any ads on your lock screen. Droid branding aside, this is the same phone as the Amazon version, just running on Verizon's network with the expected loadout of pre-installed bloatware apps. On paper it's close to last year's third-gen Moto G, with a Snapdragon 410 processor, a 5-inch 720p display and 16GB of storage.

The main trade-offs between last year's G: Lack of water resistance and a less spectacular camera. The Moto G Play is splash-resistant however, which means you won't need to worry about using it out in the rain.

Bottom line: Trading ads for bloatware gets you Moto's best super-cheap phone for less — if you're on Verizon.

One more thing: Don't expect software updates to be as quick as the unlocked version.

Best on AT&T

Samsung Galaxy Express Prime (GoPhone)

See at AT&T

In AT&T's GoPhone range, the somewhat ridiculously named Samsung Galaxy Express Prime stands out as offering the best bang for your buck. You'll get Android 6.0 Marshmallow and Samsung's TouchWiz UI on a 5-inch 720p SuperAMOLED display, powered by the Korean firm's own Exynos quad-core processor. And an ample 2,600mAh battery should be enough to see you through the day.

The Galaxy Express Prime also looks a little more eye-catching than other devices in this range, appearing like a shrunken-down Galaxy S5. Other specs aren't the greatest — only 1.5GB of RAM and a mere 5-megapixel camera, but at least there's a reasonable 16GB of internal storage, expandable via microSD.

Bottom line: Probably the best Samsung phone you're gonna find for under a hundred bucks.

One more thing: Don't expect an update to Android Nougat anytime soon, if ever.

Best on T-Mobile

Samsung Galaxy J3 Prime

See at T-Mobile

A distant cousin of the AT&T Express Prime, T-Mobile's Galaxy J3 Primepacks in the essentials for a good deal less than $100. Once again you're dealing with an entry-level quad-core processor, at 1.35GHz, 1.5GB of RAM, and a similar style of chassis.

The biggest difference is the network — if you're in a great location for T-Mobile coverage, you'll get largely the same experience as the AT&T GoPhone offering, only for less cash on a network that might suit you better.

Bottom line: You'll get Android 7.0 Nougat out of the box, which is rare for a phone this cheap.

One more thing: You'll need to buy a refill pack to get the J3 Prime for this price, which nudges the price a little over $100 in total.

Best on Sprint

Virgin Mobile Samsung Galaxy J3 Emerge

See at Virgin Mobile

Deja vu? Virgin Mobile's Samsung Galaxy J3 Emerge is basically the same phone that's sold on T-Mobile, only in a slightly different color, and running older software. You get the same core experience and feature set, only with a less up-to-date operating system and on a network that may be more convenient for you.

Bottom line: Unlike its Tmo-toting counterpart, the Galaxy J3 on Virgin and Sprint ships with Marshmallow not Nougat.

One more thing: Virgin's promotional price cut of $50 drops the J3 Emerge down to significantly under our $100 target budget.

Conclusion

You'll need to put up with the occasional ad, but Amazon's offer of a Moto G Play for under $100 is really hard to beat.

Best overall

Moto G Play

See at Amazon

The Amazon-exclusive Moto G Play is a $150 phone reduced to $100. The catch? You'll get ads and offers from the retail giant on your lock screen, which may or may not be a deal-breaker depending on how you like to use your phone. (We've got a good breakdown of what it means here).

Otherwise, you're getting a decent entry-level Android phone for not a lot of money at all. The Moto G Play (a.k.a. Moto G4 Play) packs the same soft-touch polycarbonate body as its big brother, the Moto G4, and runs a Snapdragon 410 processor, which has plenty of power to run Android 6.0 Marshmallow on a 5-inch 720p display. There's a reasonable 16GB of storage, expandable via microSD, and an 8-megapixel camera that handles the basics well.

Bottom line: Putting up with lock screen ads allows you to get a $150 phone for $100. It's not perfect, but it's a lot better than you'd otherwise get for the cash.

One more thing: It's unlocked, so you can use it on any carrier of your choice. And if you know where to look, there are some places on the Internet that'll help you take care of those pesky ads.

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6 days ago

Spotify may finally launch in India later this year

0

Spotify could make its long-awaited debut in India sometime later this year.

Google Play Music rolled out All Access in India last month, making its international catalog available to customers in the subcontinent. It now looks like Spotify and Amazon Prime Music are about to make their foray into the market, according to industry sources speaking to The-Ken (paywall).

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6 days ago

How to manage accessories, goals, and more with Samsung Health

3

Samsung Health offers you everything you need to get started on the right track to a better, more healthier version of yourself. However knowing how to manage everything this app delivers is absolutely crucial. While there are a lot of moving pieces, it's easy to stay in control.

Stay in control with Samsung Health

As you may have guessed by now, there are a lot ways to control your Samsung Health experience. Once you have gotten rolling with your fitness routine using Samsung Health to build those great new habits, you may find yourself wanting to tweak things to better suit your fitness goals.

This could involve anything from dropping a workout program when you realize it isn't the right fit for you currently, to adjusting what your daily goals are. While Samsung Health will automatically set certain goals for you, these are fully adjustable so you can have it reflect your personal goals.

Staying in control of your health is a personal journey, and not really something that anyone else can help you with unless you're committed. Using this app may help keep you motivated and track all the details of your workouts, but you will, of course, need to know how to access them.

How to drop a program

  1. Open Samsung Health.
  2. Tap on Manage items with the plus icon.

  3. Tap the program you are currently tracking.
  4. Tap drop program.

How to set your daily step goal

  1. Open Samsung Health.
  2. Tap the step counter.

  3. Tap the overflow icon that looks like three vertical dots in the upper right corner.
  4. Tap Set Target.
  5. Drag the slider to set your new daily step count goal.

How to switch between the device tracking your steps

  1. Open Samsung Health.
  2. Tap the step counter.

  3. Tap the box below the step counter.

  4. Tap the source of step count data you want to use.

How to cancel a goal

  1. Open Samsung Health.
  2. Tap a goal.
  3. Tap the overflow icon in the upper right corner that looks like three vertical dots.

  4. Tap view goal details.
  5. Tap cancel goal in the bottom right corner of your screen.
  6. Tap cancel goal.

How to export tracked data

  1. Open Samsung Health.
  2. Tap the tracked data you want to export.
  3. Tap the overflow icon that looks three vertical dots in the upper right corner.

  4. Tap export data.
  5. Tap the period of time, and file type you want to export.
  6. Tap export.

How to view a weekly summary of activity

  1. Open Samsung Health.
  2. Tap the profile icon in the upper right corner of the screen.

  3. Tap weekly summaries at the bottom of the screen.
  4. Tap the weekly summary you want to view.

Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+

Main

Verizon AT&T T-Mobile Sprint

About

The Galaxy S8, and its larger sibling the S8+, are Samsung's top-end devices for 2017 meant to appeal to the general consumer and power user alike. The two phones are only differentiated by screen and battery size: 5.8 inches and 3000mAh, and 6.2 inches and 3500mAh.

The displays have a new 18.5:9 aspect ratio with a QHD+ resolution, meaning they're extra tall and narrow. Samsung moved to on-screen buttons and reduced bezel size dramatically in order to fit as much screen into the body as possible. That moved the fingerprint sensor to the back of the phones, where it sits somewhat-awkwardly next to the camera lens. Iris scanning makes its return in a new-and-improved version from the Note 7.

Though the batteries haven't increased in size from the Galaxy S7 and S7 edge, the hope is that the improved efficiency of the new 10 nm processor inside will provide some help. The processor is backed up by 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage. Waterproofing and wireless charging are still here as well, plus a new USB-C port on the bottom. The rear camera is unchanged in terms of its 12MP sensor and f/1.7 lens, but has improved processing thanks to a new ISP and software.

Specs

Width Height Thickness 5.86 in
148.9 mm
2.68 in
68.1 mm
0.31 in
8 mm
5.47 oz
155g grams
  • Display:
    • 5.8-inch AMOLED display
    • 2960x1440 resolution
    • 18.5:9 aspect ratio
    • Dual-curve infinity display
  • Cameras:
    • 12MP ƒ/1.7 rear camera
    • Dual-pixel phase detection autofocus
    • 1.4-micron pixels
    • 8MP ƒ/1.7 front camera
  • Battery:
    • 3000 mAh battery
    • Non-removable
    • USB-C fast Charging
    • Qi + PMA wireless charging
  • Chips:
    • Snapdragon 835 processor
    • Samsung Exynos 8896 processor
      (varies by region)
    • 4GB RAM
    • 64GB internal storage
    • microSD card slot
    • Android 7.0 Nougat
  • GS8+
    • Samsung Galaxy S8+
    • 6.2-inch AMOLED display
    • 3500mAh battery
    • 6.28 in x 2.89 in x 0.32 in
      159.5mm x 73.4mm x 8.1mm
    • 6.10 oz / 73g

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6 days ago

OnePlus teams up with DxO to 'elevate' the camera experience on the OnePlus 5

15

The camera on OnePlus' upcoming flagship will be tuned by DxO.

OnePlus has announced that it is teaming up with DxO to "enhance" the camera on the OnePlus 5. DxO is the company behind DxOMark, a photography benchmark that is used by leading phone manufacturers. Just this week, HTC announced that its latest flagship — the U11 — netted the highest rating for a smartphone camera, beating out the Pixel.

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6 days ago

How to quickly launch the Galaxy S8 camera with the power button

28

The Galaxy S8's camera shortcut has moved from the home button to the power button. Here's how it works!

On the Galaxy S6 and S7, the camera app was easily accessible by double-pressing the physical home button from anywhere — screen on or off, and in any app. But the Galaxy S8 has no physical home button, which necessitated a change of strategy.

By default, the Galaxy S8 will launch the camera app if you double press the Power button. You can choose whether to Turn Off or Keep On the first time you use this shortcut.

But let's say that, perhaps, you were too quick to dismiss the helpful shortcut feature at the beginning. The good news is that you can go into the phone's settings panel to turn it back on.

How to enable Galaxy S8 camera quick launch

  1. Open the Settings panel.
  2. Tap on Advanced Features.
  3. Tap the Quick launch Camera shortcut to enable it.

Now you're back in business with the Galaxy S8's quick launch camera shortcut.

Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+

Main

Verizon AT&T T-Mobile Sprint

About

The Galaxy S8, and its larger sibling the S8+, are Samsung's top-end devices for 2017 meant to appeal to the general consumer and power user alike. The two phones are only differentiated by screen and battery size: 5.8 inches and 3000mAh, and 6.2 inches and 3500mAh.

The displays have a new 18.5:9 aspect ratio with a QHD+ resolution, meaning they're extra tall and narrow. Samsung moved to on-screen buttons and reduced bezel size dramatically in order to fit as much screen into the body as possible. That moved the fingerprint sensor to the back of the phones, where it sits somewhat-awkwardly next to the camera lens. Iris scanning makes its return in a new-and-improved version from the Note 7.

Though the batteries haven't increased in size from the Galaxy S7 and S7 edge, the hope is that the improved efficiency of the new 10 nm processor inside will provide some help. The processor is backed up by 4GB of RAM and 64GB of storage. Waterproofing and wireless charging are still here as well, plus a new USB-C port on the bottom. The rear camera is unchanged in terms of its 12MP sensor and f/1.7 lens, but has improved processing thanks to a new ISP and software.

Specs

Width Height Thickness 5.86 in
148.9 mm
2.68 in
68.1 mm
0.31 in
8 mm
5.47 oz
155g grams
  • Display:
    • 5.8-inch AMOLED display
    • 2960x1440 resolution
    • 18.5:9 aspect ratio
    • Dual-curve infinity display
  • Cameras:
    • 12MP ƒ/1.7 rear camera
    • Dual-pixel phase detection autofocus
    • 1.4-micron pixels
    • 8MP ƒ/1.7 front camera
  • Battery:
    • 3000 mAh battery
    • Non-removable
    • USB-C fast Charging
    • Qi + PMA wireless charging
  • Chips:
    • Snapdragon 835 processor
    • Samsung Exynos 8896 processor
      (varies by region)
    • 4GB RAM
    • 64GB internal storage
    • microSD card slot
    • Android 7.0 Nougat
  • GS8+
    • Samsung Galaxy S8+
    • 6.2-inch AMOLED display
    • 3500mAh battery
    • 6.28 in x 2.89 in x 0.32 in
      159.5mm x 73.4mm x 8.1mm
    • 6.10 oz / 73g

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6 days ago

Assistant finally lets you type to ask questions on your phone [Update: Now live!]

22

Google Assistant is getting much more functional.

Update: Google has started rolling out the update that will allow you to type to ask Assistant queries on your phone. Just ask the assistant to pull up images of a person or place and it will search through Google Photos to find relevant matches.

Original story follows:

Google Assistant expanded to millions of Android devices earlier this year, with the service now installed on over 100 million devices. At I/O 2017, Google is introducing new features to make the Assistant much more functional.

According to Google, over 70% of all Assistant requests are expressed through natural "conversational" language queries, with many of them being follow-up questions. Google is making the AI assistant more conversational and giving users new input methods — you'll be able to finally type to ask Assistant questions on your phone.

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6 days ago

Android Instant Apps are now open to all developers

0

After a year of testing, Android Instant Apps are now available for all developers.

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Google unveiled Instant Apps at last year's I/O, offering developers a way to build a lightweight version of their app that customers can use directly from search results. The idea is to offer a native app experience even when that particular app isn't installed on your phone. Google trialled the service with select developers earlier this year, and is now making Instant Apps available for all developers.

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6 days ago

Google Home just leapfrogged Amazon Echo at I/O 2017

55
Google Home

Google just took the lead with a 2-hour keynote address.

*/ /*-->*/

Google I/O 2017 marked a massive improvement in Google Home's capabilities, the importance of which should not be underestimated. With less than a 30 minute slice of the two-hour long keynote address, Google rolled out fresh Google Home features that improve daily functionality of the connected speaker and completely change the possibilities for both requesting and receiving information from it.

Amazon should take note.

Adding push information

Google Home

It becomes harder and harder to ignore Google Home's presence.

In what may have initially come across as a small development, Google made an important change to the way Google Home works by introducing what it calls "proactive notifications." Up to now, Google Home was always listening and waiting for your input — now, it can pulse its lights to let you know it has something to tell you. When you notice the lights, simply say "hey google, what's up?" and it will give you the timely information that you'll hopefully find useful. Google says what it pushes will be limited to only the most important information, and if done correctly it can be extremely useful.

This is a huge change to the way you're expected to interact with Google Home, and has the potential to dramatically increase use by the average Home owner. By proactively pushing useful information, it becomes harder and harder to ignore Google Home's presence, which creates a loop of using Home more often.

Calling without a catch

One large feature that caught everyone's eyes in the wake of Amazon's recent Echo announcements was free calling from Google Home. You can now simply ask Google Home to call any of your contacts, so long as they have a phone number associated with their contact entry in your Google account. This critically bests the Echo in that it actually dials a phone number — you can call any mobile or landline, rather than dialing someone else's Google Home or phone via the Home app. The outgoing calls from Home can even be masked to look like they're coming from your phone, which makes the experience 100% seamless for the person on the other end.

Call any number at any time — no strings attached.

An important function that really makes voice calling effective is Google's recent implementation of multi-user functionality based on voice recognition. If you say "call mom" it's going to dial your mom ... and if your spouse says the same query it's going to call their mother instead. A decidedly personal experience that just makes sense, but is a difficult technological problem to solve.

An entirely new interface paradigm

Google Home visual responses

Google Home can respond on your phone or TV, too.

The final part of the latest Google Home announcements has less to do with Home itself and more with how it fits into your entire life. Now Google Home is no longer operating in a silo — it's simply the contact point for your voice, and can then give you information on other devices. Google Home can now send content to your phone or TV when applicable, whether that means sending Google Maps directions to your phone when you ask or playing a YouTube video on your nearby TV.

You could easily see this as a direct shot across the bow of the new Amazon Echo Show, which made the important jump to using a screen in addition to voice so that it can always offer you information no matter your query. Google Home and Google Assistant's strength over Amazon here is that Google has potential for deeper integration with more of your screens. Chromecast and Android TV give more options for your big screens and multi-room audio, while Google Assistant being built into just about every Android phone offers a deep hook in billions of devices.

Of course this is only a big feature if you're a household that already has Chromecasts or Android TVs — which isn't necessarily a given — but the potential is there in ways that Amazon can't yet offer.

Your move, Amazon

With these fresh Google Home features, the ball is back in Amazon's court to try and step up and match what Google Home is now capable of. Amazon may have a larger, longer-standing install base of Echo devices, with new hardware coming, but Google's superiority in software and platforms is winning right now.

Google Hardware

Google Home family

Google Wifi:

Google Amazon

Google Home:

Google Best Buy

Chromecast Ultra:

Google Best Buy

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6 days ago

Google Lens is Google Goggles on steroids — and everything Bixby Vision should have been

20
Google Lens

Google's big data advantage might help it surpass the Galaxy S8's fledgling Bixby feature.

*/ /*-->*/

Google Lens was one of the major announcements of the I/O 2017 keynote, as Google revealed the latest step in its visual search journey. This is an endeavor which can be traced back to Google Image Search years ago, and which is a close relative of the AI powering Google Photos' object and scene recognition.

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6 days ago

Google Photos gets smarter and more social: Top 4 announcements from Google I/O 2017

9

The new features will certainly be helpful for loyal users, but they also exist to help you to spread the word on what Google Photos can do.

*/ /*-->*/

Google has more than half a billion active users uploading over a billion image files to Google Photos daily, so it's no surprise that the company is doubling down on what's turning out to be a successful photo-sharing platform.

At Google I/O 2017, the company announced a host of new features coming to the feature-filled photo sharing service. Here's a quick jaunt through what's new with Google Photos, as well as some of the new features that are coming later this summer.

Watch Google's explainer on what's new with Google Photos.

Suggested sharing

You're using Google Photos to store your photos, so naturally Google wants you to share them with other people. Suggested sharing uses machine learning to actively suggestion who to share a picture with. If your friend Brad is in the photo, for instance, Google Photos will suggest that you send the photo to him so that he knows how silly he looked at the pool party last Saturday. Additionally, Google's machine learning will give Brad suggestions when he sees this photo, so that he can share it with anyone else who might be interested.

You can invite anyone to see a photo, even if they don't have the Google Photos app installed. iPhone users, for instance, will receive a notification with a link to the photo, and be invited to add others to share the photo with, too. It's a share-share situation!

Shared libraries

Google Photos' Anil Sabharwal shows the crowd at Google I/O 2017 what Shared Libraries are all about.

Got a giant extended family? That's fine; now you can share an entire photo library with them all so that anyone can share photos of each other whenever there's occasion to. Shared Libraries work akin to shared photo albums, though they'll stay integrated in your own camera roll. You'll be able to search through those pictures without having to navigate to a particular photo album, too, and with the machine learning engine working behind the scenes in Google Photos, any extra, non-interesting photos you snap won't be filed in there.

Google Lens

Google Lens is coming soon, and it's going to add more functionality to Google Photos.

The Google Lens features aren't ready for Google Photos yet, but the machine learning engine is coming later this summer. Google Lens will be able to understand what's in an image, identify what you're looking at, and help you edit photos on the fly. It'll even get rid of obstructions in an image — in the event you actually catch your finger ruining an an otherwise amazing photo, for example.

Photo Books

You can order a Photo Book now from Google Photos.

Photo books are a major thing for many families, and they're especially helpful if you just want to show a number of choices photos from your last trip, for example. Google Photos will be able to identify the best photos you've taken from any album and curate it into a worth-to-share picture book.

A 7-inch softcover will cost $9.99, while the hardcover version will cost $19.99. The books are 20 pages by defaults and features 40 of the best photos. Additional pages will cost $0.35 in the softcover, and $0.65 on hardcover. Photo Books are available now for Google Photos on the web and will come to iOS and Android soon.

The easiest-to-use photo app

The latest announcements for Google Photos should be no surprise if you've been utilizing the service since its major revamp two years back, particularly with regards to its machine learning capabilities. Shared Libraries are also merely evolutions of a sharing feature that's already existed — you've been able to share individual photos and albums before, but now it's more inviting to those who may not be privy to the Photos' existence.

It's obvious Google is committed to making its photo-storage service soar, which is why it's intent on getting the word out on its usefulness. These features have been added to encourage its veteran users to share photos while inspiring the uninitiated to switch to the service and take advantage of what it can do.

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6 days ago

Google's 'Find My Device' app is the next-gen Android Device Manager

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Android Device Manager is now Find My Device, and it has a few new features to keep it useful and relevant.

One of the less publicized announcements at Google I/O was the rebranding of the popular Android Device Manager — the app that allows you to find or reset a lost or stolen phone — to Find My Device, with a new design and some additional features.

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The fundamentals of the app haven't changed — you still use it to look up the current location, or last GPS location, of any Android device associated with that particular Google account. But the app looks new, with a nice dose of Material Design, and the ability to check the battery and Wi-Fi status if the phone is searchable.

If the phone isn't accessible to Find My Device, it shows the last known location, which could prove incredibly useful when searching for a phone that's been stolen or lost under the proverbial seat cushion.

Find your phone: the ultimate guide to Android Device Manager

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6 days ago

Kodi 18 Leia: What you need to know about the next version of Kodi for Android

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Everything you need to know about the next version of Kodi that's heading to Android.

Kodi 17.1 "Krypton" is the current release that's available through the Google Play Store, but work on next version of the popular media server software is already well underway. In a break from the normal routine of choosing names within the community, Kodi 18 will be known as "Leia," in honor of everyone's favorite princess who sadly left us.

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6 days ago

Best Samsung Phones

If you're into Android, a Samsung phone is probably on your list. Here's what to consider.

Since the debut of the Galaxy S2, Samsung has ranked as one of the top selling manufacturers of Android smartphones. Over the years, the South Korean company has managed to positively iterate on its flagship offerings by offering new features and a better interface with every new model.

This year, it's the Galaxy S8 that takes the spotlight as the defacto Samsung device, but it's not the only Galaxy offering you can choose from. Here's a guide on the differences between the varying high-end Samsung devices you should consider adopting as your daily driver.

This article is updated periodically. It was last updated May 2017.

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6 days ago

Daydream Standalone: Everything we know so far

Google is upgrading Daydream in a big way.

On stage at Google I/O today, VR VP Clay Bavor announced the next step in Daydream's evolution. While using your phone to power a VR headset is convenient, and the experiences created there have been impressive, the next step will probably not be powered by your phone. Clay dubbed this evolution of Daydream "Standalone VR" and this is what we know about it so far!

Read more at VRHeads.com

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