Headlines

3 years ago

PlayStation Store and games now available on Sony Xperia S

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For whatever reason, Sony wasn't able to finish up PlayStation support for the Xperia S before the phone hit store shelves in Europe. Today, though, that placeholder link in the Xperia S app drawer now loads a web page where the PlayStation Store and PS Pocket app can be downloaded. The same goes for the Xperia S's Japanese counterpart, the Acro HD, which launched in late February.

To get your fill of classic 32-bit titles, you'll first need to enable non-Market applications in Settings > Applications, then run "Let's start PS store" in the app tray. Next, download the two apps, which in turn will let you buy and play games. We're seeing around a dozen titles available on our review unit, though some of those are still only playable on the Xperia Play. And it should be noted that you'll need a PlayStation Network or Sony Entertainment Network account to access Sony's mobile gaming catalog.

The manufacturer plans to bring PS certification to all its 2012 phones, including the Xperia P, U, Ion and the recently-announced Xperia Sola.

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3 years ago

Motorola MOTOACTV now officially available in Canada for $250

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Although you could have picked it up from a few online retailers previously, the Motorola  MOTOACTV has now officially been released in Canada. The Android-based fitness tracker that has seen a few large updates since it's general release will be sold at select Running Room locations across Canada as well as online at thesource.ca with a MRSP of $249.99 (8GB) including a watch strap. Looking to learn more? You can check our full review here.

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3 years ago

Radio transplant brings AT&T Galaxy Note to life on T-Mobile's '4G' HSPA+

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Since it emerged that the AT&T Galaxy Note's hardware supported T-Mobile's HSPA frequencies, there's been a cash bounty out for anyone able to bring Tmo 3G and '4G' connectivity to the device. Now it may be time for someone to collect that reward, as a method involving copying over parts of radio firmware from other devices has resulted in success.

The method, discovered by hacker 'Tomin.FHL,' requires users with rooted, SIM-unlocked AT&T Notes to download and flash specific parts of a radio file from another phone through ClockworkMod recovery. And that's pretty much it. Though obviously you'll well and truly void your warranty in the process, which means you'll be on your own if something goes wrong (like, say, bricking your phone because you flashed a hacked radio onto it).

Over on XDA​, various forum members have tried the hack with varying levels of success. The general consensus seems to be that it works, though you can expect slower HSPA data rates than you'd get on an officially-sanctioned Tmo device. If you're understand the risks, you'll find more info over at the source link.

Source: XDA; via: TechCrunch

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3 years ago

ICS on the SGS II, Rezound Pacific time [From the Forums]

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If you've been following along with the news today, then you heard the news about Google IO registrations opening up. While we spent most of the day dreaming about what we'll see there, there was plenty of other news that followed. If you're looking to get back in the loop, check out some of the previous posts or head on into the Android Central forums for more discussion:

If you're not already a member of the Android Central forums, you can register your account today.

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3 years ago

Why to use a secure lockscreen [security and privacy]

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We've talked before about how to set up your Android phone with a secure lockscreen, and today we're going to talk about why you should do it. We're all concerned about our privacy and security when it comes to our smartphones and connected devices, and the first step is to take whatever measures are available to us and put them to good use. It's not very wise to sit back and complain about the security issues if we're not willing to take any steps ourselves to keep things private. Ultimately, we as users are responsible for security and privacy on our phones. 

A rally against an application, or our carriers, for privacy concerns is all well and good. It's something we all need to concern ourselves with, and be armed with as much information as possible. But in the end, we have to make the final decisions about what we feel is secure and what isn't. A good start is to keep your private information safe in the event that you lose your phone or it gets stolen. It happens -- it's happened to me, it's likely happened to more than a few of you. You either leave your phone behind somewhere and it's gone when you go looking for it, or some unsavory type takes it upon himself to make your property disappear. A couple years back I was relieved of my laptop and briefcase containing two smartphones in a parking garage, and after the initial period of anger and shock I instantly worried about the fellow having access to my information -- not the equipment itself. Luckily, everything was password locked and I don't think any of my precious data made its way into someone else's hands. The laptop and phones were replaced, and all was well.

That scenario would have played out a good bit differently had the phones been left unprotected. Besides my personal information (which I certainly don't want anyone to have access to) I had business contacts, documents that were covered under an NDA, and other information that would have caused quite a stir if it had ended up in the wrong hands. Companies -- even and especially the one you work for -- take that sort of thing pretty damn seriously, and they should. That means you should. Whether it's some sort of trade secrets, sensitive financial data, or just information about your family, you don't want someone getting hold of it. Would you want someone horrible enough to steal your phone knowing which school your kids attend, or your Mom's address? What about your banking information, or your work email? Just because you have nothing to hide doesn't mean you shouldn't care. If you think cancelling and replacing credit cards and your drivers license is a pain when you lose your wallet, imagine what it's like trying to fix things when your Google account has been compromised. Or your PayPal account. Or even Facebook. 

Yes, it's inconvenient to have to type in a PIN or passcode every time you unlock your phone. It's also inconvenient to pay your car insurance every month. But when the time comes that you need either, you'll be glad you did.

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3 years ago

NOOK for Android - v3.1 update brings access to Barnes & Noble’s collection of comics, graphic novels and manga titles

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The latest update to NOOK for Android has bumped the app into v3.1 and aside from having the normal bug fixes and stability improvements in it, you can now also have access to Barnes & Noble’s collection of comics, graphic novels and manga titles.

With exciting graphics in stunning color that virtually jump off the page, NOOK Comics enables customers to explore favorite super heroes and characters in landscape and portrait and pinch and zoom to dive into even the tiniest details of the action. Barnes & Noble’s vast selection of NOOK Comics features the largest digital collection of Marvel’s graphic novels available through a third party, as well as titles from other leading publishers including Archie, IDW, Dynamite and Dark Horse.

The v3.1 update also includes NOOK Shop enhancements that allow folks to easily add or edit the default credit card associated to their account, as well as  un-archive content with a single tap in NOOK Library. The update is available now in the Google Play Store and you'll find the download link, past the break.

Source: Barnes & Noble

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3 years ago

T-Mobile G-Slate getting an update to v10p, which is not ICS

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The T-Mobile G-Slate is in the midst of getting an OTA update to version 10p, which will bring security fixes, USB controller support, and a fix for an Android Market (Google Play?) update problem. It's not Ice Cream Sandwich, and at first glance it looks like it will be based off Android 3.2. All we're sure about at this moment is that it's version 10p.

Worth noting that you'll need to clear data on the Download Manager app to install the update, which the notice screen reminds you to do before installation. Be sure to back up any files you may have sitting in the Download Manager, just in case they too are deleted. You'll also have to have your G-Slate charged up before you can continue. 

If you're one of the few who picked up the G-Slate, now would be a good time to check for updates.

More: T-Mobile; Thanks, CXENTE!

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3 years ago

Regulator approves T-Mobile / Orange plans for UK 4G network this year

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Ofcom proposal paves the way for first UK 4G LTE
network launch later in the year

British smartphone users have had to watch from the sidelines as North American and Asian carriers roll out ever faster 4G networks. However, UK telecoms regulator Ofcom has today issued a initial ruling which represents the first step towards two leading networks' 4G plans coming to fruition. The regulator has preliminarily approved plans from T-Mobile UK and Orange (under the "Everything Everywhere" banner) to re-farm their existing 1800MHz spectrum for use with LTE and Wimax.

If this happens, it'll make Tmo and Orange the first UK networks to roll out 4G services. Rivals O2, Three and Vodafone all plan on launching LTE on 800MHz and 2600MHz bands, and these haven't yet been auctioned off. And 800MHz airwaves in particular are still used for analog TV broadcasts in some parts of the UK. Competing networks have until April 17 to respond to the ruling, but as GigaOM ​points out, Ofcom's wording makes it clear they've no worries that the plans will hand Everything Everywhere an unfair advantage.

Ofcom estimates that assuming final approval was given in Q2, EE would be able to light up its LTE network around the end of Q3 -- potentially a full year ahead of the rest of the pack. As we've seen in other LTE markets, major cities will probably see 4G services first -- and we'd expect Mifis and 4G dongles to hit the market before the first LTE-enabled smartphones appear. Nevertheless, the possibility of next-gen networks finally arriving in the UK is a tantalizing one, and we'll be watching EE's plans with interest.

Source: Ofcom; via: GigaOM

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3 years ago

DroidDoodle: Don't poke the iPad

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Don't poke the iPad.

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3 years ago

HTC One S rooted before release with Modaco Superboot

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Much like the HTC One X that saw root come by way of MoDaCo's Superboot previously, the HTC One S has also been given the same treatment. All the same rules apply here as they did for the One X, meaning you'll be needing a device with S-OFF in order to get this to work and since HTC doesn't ship devices with their bootloaders unlocked, we'll have to wait and see how quick they offer up usage of the bootloader unlock tool. Unless of course, someone takes it upon themselves to beat them to the punch. In either case, whenever S-OFF can be achieved on the retail units you'll only need to load up the MoDaCo Superboot and you'll have root.

Download: MoDaCo

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3 years ago

The Telegraph to launch new Android application

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The Telegraph, long respected British broadsheet newspaper, have announced they are to launch a new application for Android. 

Not content with just pushing their printed content to a mobile app, The Telegraph's offering will also bring with it breaking news, live financial data, picture galleries and video content. 

Perhaps the best feature though -- well for soccer football fanatics like myself -- is how The Telegraph will be handling their football coverage. Live scores, tables, fixtures and results are a given, but subscribers in the UK will also be able to access Premier League highlights courtesy of ESPN. Goals can even be viewed when a match is still being played. 

The usual social network sharing options are on board, so your friends on Facebook and followers on Twitter can see the news stories you want to share with them. A customizable homepage is also thrown in for you to tailor the content you want to see.

Print subscribers -- and iPad subscribers if you're into that sort of thing -- will be able to take advantage of this application free of charge. The rest of us will have to pay a subscription fee, but The Telegraph are offering a free one month trial before you commit. No launch date has been given as yet, but is expected to be announced in the coming weeks. 

Source: The Telegraph

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3 years ago

Tag Heuer launching eye-wateringly priced Android smartphone

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Are you in the market for a truly exclusive Android smartphone? Money not an issue? Well luxury Swiss watch maker Tag Heuer have just the device for you. Their latest creation is called the Racer, it does run Android, and will cost a staggering €2800 ($3670).

So what does all that money actually buy? No plastic for one. The Racer is constructed from carbon fiber and titanium, protected by a shockproof rubber chassis. With its exposed screws and "avant-garde communication" labeling, the Racer certainly looks expensive. 

Curiously -- and despite having the four buttons on the front -- we're promised the "latest Android software" on the Racer. For the price though you would have to say that a little Ice Cream Sandwich is the least you deserve. Specs are pretty sparse -- read non-existent -- at this stage, but we are promised a "new customizable 3D user interface to fit the individual needs of each owner." 

CrackBerry Kevin's beloved Porsche Design BlackBerry P'9981 has itself some company in the exclusive, ridiculously expensive, designer smartphone market. The Racer is due in July, and to get one you'll be visiting one of Tag Heuer's own boutiques, selected watch and jewelry retailers and luxury mobile boutiques. Definitely no Best Buy on this one. Check out a short promo video after the break. 

Source: Tag Heuer

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3 years ago

Input/Output is Google's solution for killing time until IO 2012

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Google is busy gearing up for its big IO Developer Conference in June (we'll be there!), but what's the point of hard work without a little bit of fun? Today the developers team introduced us to its idea of a good time: Input/Output, a game of strategy, geometry, architecture, and all that stuff that you may or may not consider fun depending on your level of geeky. In order to build the perfect machine, you'll need to arrange (and rearrange, and then rearrange again) pendulums, flippers, elevators, redirectors, tracks, and walls to get your particle from one end of the screen to the next. It's a bit of an acquired taste, but if you're visiting the Google Developers' page in the first place, you probably have at least some interest. And hey, if you're good enough, your machine will be featured front row center during the conference. Fun or not, it's definitely one way to kill the time between now and June 26.

Source: Google IO

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3 years ago

T-Mobile HSPA+ lights up in 8 new cities

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T-Mobile today announced that it's flipped the switch on its HSPA+ 4G network on eight new cities. They are:

  • Abilene, Texas
  • Amarillo, Texas
  • Odessa, Texas
  • Victoria, Texas
  • Bakersfield, Calif.
  • Eau Claire, Wis.
  • Joplin, Mo.
  • St. Joseph, Mo.

T-Mobile CTO Neville Ray in a blog post also says that the company's priority is now on prepping for an LTE rollout in 2013, and that it'll be "well positioned and ready to move to LTE Advanced" beyond that.

More: T-Mobile

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3 years ago

Google IO 2012 registration to start March 27

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Registration for this year's Google IO developer conference in San Francisco will begin at 7 a.m. PDT March 27. And you'd better set your alarm -- the 2011 conference sold out in less than an hour. Here's the pricing breakdown:

  • General attendee: $900 -- up significantly from 2011.
  • Academia (student, faculty): $300

Google's got a few rules to follow, too -- only one ticket can be purchased per person, and it's up to Google to approve any ticket transfers. You'll also need access to Google+ and Google Wallet to register.

It's worth a reminder that you'll undoubtedly be hearing about the hardware Google likes to give away at its developer conferences -- last year it was a Samsung Verizon LTE Mifi and a special-edition Galaxy Tab 10.1 -- but graft is the absolutely wrong reason to go to IO. The giant wall of candy and robots and the big official party and the hours and hours of information from the people that make all this happen? Now that's the reason to go.

The 2012 Google IO conference has expanded to three days and runs from June 27-29 at Moscone West in SOMA. And you can bet your bippy we'll be there for the whole thing.

Be sure to check out our complete coverage of Google IO 2011 for a taste of what we might see this year.

More: Google IO registration

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