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11 min ago

What are VoLTE and HD Voice, and why should you use them?

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What is VoLTE and why should I care about it?

Here in the U.S., most carriers have rolled out the red carpet for Voice over LTE. If it is available in your area and through your carriers, taking advantage of the upgrade currently depends on your having the right hardware. Once you have everything you need, setting VoLTE up on your phone is very easy and well worth it.

Let's take a deeper look.

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1 hour ago

Google Play is still in beta, but it's good to be back on Chrome Stable

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Google Play is finally on the Chrome Stable channel for the Asus Flip and the Acer R11.

Google has made a lot of progress getting Google Play and Android apps working on Chrome. It wasn't the worst thing to come out of Mountain View when it initially launched, but there were bugs and it lacked a lot of polish, especially when running next to Chrome itself which is dead-simple and very user-friendly. The worst part of the experience for me and many others was using the Chrome Dev channel.

I really like being able to run a handful of apps from Google Play on my Asus Flip. I actually enjoy using a Chromebook for work and play, and the addition of apps like Slack and Hangouts — that are far better than their corresponding Chrome extensions — make me more productive. Each is one less thing I have to use my phone to do. But some of that shine was taken away when the browser would crash, or tabs would reload while I was a few hundred words into a writing groove, or everything would just stop working for a few seconds at a time. That makes things pretty rough, and eventually, I was back to the Stable channel on another Chromebook and left my Flip be a "testing device" which is really what the Dev Channel or Canary are for. Playing with developer software is fun, but I don't recommend you try to depend on it.

Using developer software can be fun, but I can't depend on it.

Thankfully, the Chrome Stable update to 53.0.2785.129 for the Asus Flip and the Acer R11 carried the Google Play store along with it. It's still in beta, and it can still be a little finicky. The Play Store tells me I have no connection more often than it should. Every once in a while when I go to pull up an app from my shelf it has to restart. Annoying, but not show-stopping because everything else is working fine again. And it's nice to have those few apps available again even if not perfect. My long national nightmare is over. Or something like that.

There are plenty of other Chromebooks that will get access to Google Play "soon." The Chromebook Pixel (the 2015 version) hasn't been updated to a Stable channel build with Google Play just yet, but we know it's coming. Along with plenty of models from HP and Dell and everyone else who makes them. We have no exact timeline, for I'm looking for it to be a few weeks yet so Google and everyone involved can make sure the initial push to more users goes as smoothly as they had hoped before they push things out to any more models — we all know how Google likes to take its time with software rollouts and extended testing. When it happens we'll let you know.

Here's where I ask you to write a bunch of words! If you have an R11 or a Flip and didn't jump to Dev to try Google Play (a longshot, I know) tell us what you think about it now. It's a definite improvement on the Stable channel, and that might make us think it's better than it is because we saw how much worse things could be. And if you've been using Google Play all along on your Chromebook, let me know that I'm not crazy and it really is a better experience on Stable.

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1 hour ago

Mobile Nations Weekly: Sequels and successors

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iPhone 7 takes the world by storm, Forza races onto consoles everywhere, and yet another chat platform says Allo.

If there's only one iPhone 7 review you read, make it Rene's at iMore. Diving deep into what makes the new iPhone, both good and bad, it's everything you need to know about the phone you're going to start seeing everywhere. Oh, and there's also a whole new version of tvOS and even an updated and renamed Mac operating system.

The HP Elite x3 is the best Windows phone that Dan's ever used, but it's not yet ready. It's an awkward position. Forza Horizon 3 is one of the best racing games ever, if not the best — and the best Xbox One game. And Gears of War 4, coming in October is shaping up to be one heck of a game, and as an Xbox Play Anywhere title it'll work on both Xbox One and PC with one purchase.

After a few months of gestation, Google's anticipated chat app slash smart assistant Allo has launched. It's Google's latest attempt at a communications platform, and it's mostly stripped down the messaging side and seriously ramped up on the artificial intelligence. But if you're more into the hardware side of things, Google's next Nexus Pixel phones are coming on October 4. Probably.

If VR's your thing, Sony's PlayStation VR appears to be threading the needle between the accessible and affordable options that lack power (Samsung Gear VR) and the super powerful versions that demand an expensive PC to even function (HTC Vive, Oculus Rift). You might have heard of Sony — they've been doing the whole console gaming thing for a few years now — so it's no surprise that PlayStation VR has an impressive list of games lined up for launch.

Which smartphone camera do YOU think is the best?

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3 hours ago

From the Editor's Desk: How to launch a smartphone

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It's okay, and entirely expected, to be frustrated by cumbersome phone launches — but some perspective on what's happening can be helpful.

Launching a smartphone is difficult. Even if you think you understand how difficult it is, it's far more difficult still. When you're a small company you have a certain set of problems, usually limited by money and scale of distribution; but if you're big, you have an exponentially larger customer base to serve and the issues associated with the momentum of a huge company.

In the past couple of weeks we've seen a range of issues come front and center before consumers. On one hand, we have the Note 7 — it hit the market swiftly with carrier and retailer support, but had a critical battery flaw that required weeks of backtracking and recalls. Then we have Moto and Sony, which both just launched unlocked phones in the U.S. for what most are calling "too high" $699 prices — bonus round of fail is Moto is launching unlocked nearly four months later than its Verizon Droid Editions (which themselves launched over a month after announce). And finally we have the LG V20, which was unveiled three weeks ago now and we've yet to see even a peep of pricing, availability or pre-orders from the U.S. carriers — and no indication whatsover that it's coming to Europe.

When launching a phone, stumbles are almost inevitable.

The point here is that no matter how big or small the company is, the process of creating and launching a phone while hitting every last point to a T is near impossible. And even when you think you've really nailed it, something happens in the open market that can torpedo the plans. There are so many moving parts, whether it's manufacturing, distribution, carrier partnerships, pricing quibbles with the accounting department or a problem with a supplier. Something inevitably has to give, and there are compromises made throughout the process.

We hold these companies to extremely high standards, and rightfully so — they're asking for a lot of our money, loyalty and patience when launching new products. But if we take a minute to consider just how many balls are up in the air at any given time for a phone launch, it can help us understand what's happening while we're frustrated that our next phone costs $700, is launching two months late and is missing a key feature.

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18 hours ago

Pokémon Go updates: Everything you need to know

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There's a new Pokemon Go update. Here's what you need to know!

Pokémon Go updates aren't common, but they are a big deal. Here's what you need to know about each major one!


Update, September 10: Added information about version 0.37.0 with the new Appraisal system!

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21 hours ago

Hiroshi Lockheimer is on the Pixel hype train

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OK, we get it. As the SVP of Android, Chrome and Google Play Lockheimer should be amped about the things to come. We'd go as far as saying that's his job. So what makes this particular time a company executive praising his products worth talking about?

He's comparing the coming Pixel phones (all but confirmed to be coming on October 4) to Android's debut with the T-Mobile G1. And he's doing it in front of all the die-hard Android nerds who are going to hold him to it.

We have limited information about what's in store come October. We gather that the rebranding of Google's Nexus line with the Pixel name means a more active involvement from Google in all areas — from design and software to advertising and support. Think of them as HTC phones made for someone else like HTC used to do for HP and Palm — yes, your old Treo 650 was made by HTC. This means Google is the company who will see these phones succeed or fail. And Lockheimer is betting on success.

We have to wait a few more weeks to see the Pixel phones for ourselves. And we'll have to wait even longer to say anything about their success. In the meantime, we'll take all the teasing you care to give us, Hiroshi.

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1 day ago

MrMobile Retro Review: Looking back at the Nokia N-Gage

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In 2003, Nokia declared war on Nintendo with the N-Gage, a Game Boy Advance lookalike with a Series 60 mobile phone inside. The conflict – to put it mildly – did not go in Nokia's favor. With a cumbersome design that required the owner to remove the battery in order to change games, the N-Gage wasn't exactly user-friendly, and with only a handful of available titles compared to the Game Boy Advance's 1,200, the N-Gage ecosystem hardly justified the device's $299 asking price. Worse still: the phone's earpiece was mounted on its spine, making for a bizarre look and feel when it came to voice calls and leading to the unfortunate nickname "Taco Phone."

Needless to say, Nokia's N-Gage experiment did not go well. The company launched a sequel (the N-Gage QD) in 2004 and eventually repositioned N-Gage as a gaming platform that spanned its Symbian smartphone line, but it never gained the traction Nokia sought and the brand was shuttered in 2010.

Today, the original N-Gage is a monument to the days when new form factors flooded a nascent mobile market, and a still-dominant Nokia led the charge to pack ever more functionality into the humble cell phone. Join MrMobile for the Nokia N-Gage Retro Review – and if you owned one of these (or even if you just wanted one) drop a comment below with your story!

Gettin' social with it!

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1 day ago

Android and chill: Nougat and the root question

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Android is safer than ever for the people who want (and need) it to be safe. We should be happy about that.

There's some talk about Pixel phones and root — specifically that it's not working with any of the existing methods. All the nuts and bolts are at XDA — excellent job on that Mishaal — for those who want to dig deeper into the how and why, but I want to just talk about what it means for us.

And why it's a really good thing. Before you grab your torches and teach me a lesson for thinking it's good that we can't root a Pixel phone, hear me out. I think you'll agree when we're finished.

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1 day ago

Samsung Galaxy S8 reportedly using powerful new GPU

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Samsung phones sign

ARM Mali-G71 could provide the power for a 4K display and enhanced VR.

Rumors of a 4K display in the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S8 have been swirling for some time, with a super-dense display offering a significantly upgraded VR experience in next year's flagship. And now it's reported that Samsung could use ARM's most powerful GPU yet in its next Exynos processors.

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1 day ago

Evening brief: Google's ready to launch a Wi-Fi router ... and then buy Twitter

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Google's making splashes out there, but it's not the only news!

Twitter has been rumored to be for sale for ... well, forever. The latest rumors claim that Google's in the running to acquire the social network — maybe this one will work out better than Google+ did. In further (and far simpler) rumor news, it sounds like Google may be planning to launch its own Wi-Fi router, but it won't be part of the OnHub brand. It also won't be part of Google Home, which is a separate device.

And now a little bit of carrier news. Verizon rolled out all of its advanced calling features to prepaid accounts today, further legitimizing the choice of going with a simple, cheaper plan from the carrier. With a compatible device, you can now get HD voice calls, simultaneous voice and data, and six-way calling. Over in the UK, EE is teasing upcoming phone announcements in October — I wonder what those could be? Go forth and catch up with today's news!

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1 day ago

Best Android Phone Under $400

OnePlus 3

Tired of overspending for the latest and greatest? Get flagship-level performance at half the price.

Best overall

OnePlus 3

See at OnePlus

The OnePlus 3 is, simply put, the best package under $400. You're basically purchasing Samsung-level performance at an unlocked price.

Inside, the OnePlus 3 is like any other flagship: It has a powerful Snapdragon 820 processor, a solid 3000mAh battery, and a stellar 16-megapixel rear-facing camera with capable low light performance. The OnePlus 3 also has 6GB of RAM, which might not seem entirely significant at first, but the extra bit of memory really does come in handy over time. And though its 5.5-inch display is a mere 1080p in a Quad HD world, you'll come to appreciate the energy savings.

Do keep in mind that if you bring home this aluminum-bodied beauty that you won't have Google behind the software updates. OnePlus is in charge of its OxygenOS, and while it provides a near-similar experience as Google's Android, it's packed with extra features that you'd typically have to download a third-party app to implement. Still, it's a better alternative to the other versions of Android floating around out there.

Bottom line: Flagships are expensive without a subsidy, so if you're looking to save some cash but you don't want to skimp on the features, the OnePlus 3 is a worthy choice.

One more thing: Because of its unlocked nature, the OnePlus 3 is only compatible with AT&T and T-Mobile (and their respective MVNOs) in the U.S.

Why the OnePlus 3 is the best

The phone to get if you want bang for your buck.

For a mere $400, you get the top of the line specifications, stellar smartphone performance, a rear-facing camera that's almost as good as the competition, and solid battery life. And sure, the OnePlus 3 may be the "alternative" flagship, but it hardly looks it.

It might not appear exemplary at first, but Andrew Martonik's review of the device earlier this year makes a convincing argument for why it's so stellar:

Every edge, every join of materials, every cutout, every transition from curve to flat — every placement is perfect. This precision is hardly exclusive to OnePlus nowadays, as just about any manufacturer can now do things with metal and glass that were previously reserved to multi-billion-dollar companies just a few years ago. But just because you can do it now doesn't mean every phone is built as well as the OnePlus 3.

The design on this device is stunning, and it's even more attractive after you pop on one of OnePlus's fashionable back covers.

OnePlus hasn't typically had the best track record when it comes to its device launches and software updates, but the company is quickly changing its tune. OnePlus ditched its archaic, invite-only business model and made the phone readily available for anyone who has cash to burn.

The only drawback of the OnePlus 3 is that its software and security updates depend entirely on its small software development team, which historically hasn't kept up with the industry leaders in updates. But the OnePlus 3 is a hell of a deal at its price point, so if you're looking to save some cash without compromising much, this smartphone is your best bet.

Best shiny phone

Honor 8

See at Amazon

Do you like shiny things? The Honor 8 is plenty shiny for those of you attempting to add more sheen into your life. I mean, just look at the blue color featured here. It's even more gorgeous in person, and it doesn't cost an arm and a leg.

The Honor 8 is Huawei's second attempt at entering the U.S. market. It's got a 5.2-inch 1080p display, a 3000mAh battery, 4GB of RAM, and Huawei's in-house developed Kirin 950 processor. The Honor 8 also has dual 12-megapixel rear-facing cameras, both of which work in conjunction to produce the best possible photo you could want. As we discussed in our review, it's plenty capable of being your primary shooter.

The only drawback of the Honor 8 is that Huawei's EMUI is a bit of a doozy to get used to. Its default launcher doesn't offer an app drawer, so you'll have to find another launcher if you're used to having one. It also comes with a bit of bloatware and extra apps you might find redundant alongside Google's offerings, though you can thankfully uninstall and deactivate them at will.

Bottom line: If you're looking for last year's flagship performance at an affordable price point, the Honor 8 is an impressive little package.

One more thing: Like the OnePlus 3, the unlocked Honor 8 is only compatible with AT&T and T-Mobile's networks, along with their associated prepaid MVNOs.

Best to try something new

ZTE Axon 7

See at Amazon

You might have forgotten that ZTE is a major player in the U.S. smartphone wars, but that's okay. The good news is that the company is the brains behind the very impressive Axon line and the Axon 7 is a worthwhile choice if you don't mind dealing with a clunky Android interface.

The ZTE Axon 7 offers a 5.5-inch Quad HD AMOLED display, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 3250mAh battery. It also has a 20-megapixel rear-facing camera, though it's not the best shooter in low light environments. But if you're an audiophile, the Axon 7 might make your ears perk up.

Bottom line: If you're tired of the same old smartphone brands in your life, the ZTE Axon 7 might be that "something new" that becomes your "something constant."

One more thing: The Axon 7 is equipped with the bands necessary to work on a network like Verizon Wireless, but your best bet is to be an AT&T or T-Mobile (or their prepaid brands) subscriber before purchasing this device.

Best for even less

Moto G4 Plus

See at Amazon

Not everyone wants to wield the latest and greatest. The Moto G4 Plus will do just fine if you're simply in the market for a solid smartphone. The G4 Plus offers a 5.5-inch Full HD display, a 1.5GHz Snapdragon 617 processor, and up to 3GB of RAM. It also has a 16-megapixel rear-facing camera and a front-facing fingerprint sensor, so you can be just as secure as all your friends with their cool flagships.

Take heed that there are several versions of the Moto G4. Here's a look at what's different between the two primary models, the Moto G4 and G4 Plus.

Bottom line: If you love living the unlocked life and only need the basics to get you through it, the Moto G4 Play Plus is the way to go.

One more thing: Motorola's been pretty consistent with its software updates.

Best overall

OnePlus 3

See at OnePlus

The OnePlus 3 is, simply put, the best package under $400. You're basically purchasing Samsung-level performance at an unlocked price.

Inside, the OnePlus 3 is like any other flagship: It has a powerful Snapdragon 820 processor, a solid 3000mAh battery, and a stellar 16-megapixel rear-facing camera with capable low light performance. The OnePlus 3 also has 6GB of RAM, which might not seem entirely significant at first, but the extra bit of memory really does come in handy over time. And though its 5.5-inch display is a mere 1080p in a Quad HD world, you'll come to appreciate the energy savings.

Do keep in mind that if you bring home this aluminum-bodied beauty that you won't have Google behind the software updates. OnePlus is in charge of its OxygenOS, and while it provides a near-similar experience as Google's Android, it's packed with extra features that you'd typically have to download a third-party app to implement. Still, it's a better alternative to the other versions of Android floating around out there.

Bottom line: Flagships are expensive without a subsidy, so if you're looking to save some cash but you don't want to skimp on the features, the OnePlus 3 is a worthy choice.

One more thing: Because of its unlocked nature, the OnePlus 3 is only compatible with AT&T and T-Mobile (and their respective MVNOs) in the U.S.

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1 day ago

Unlock your Chromebook using your Android phone with Smart Lock

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While the idea that Android is the key to the future is debatable, it can easily be a key to your Chromebook.

Here is a cool Chromebook feature some of us didn't know about: you can use the Smart Lock feature on your Android phone to enable Smart Lock on your Chromebook! Once set up, as long as your phone is in Bluetooth range, instead of needing to use your password to unlock your Chromebook you can click an icon to sign in via your phone's credentials. The feature has been around for a while, but it's really improved and even looks nice in a Google Material way.

A few caveats apply: your phone has to be fully booted, and both the phone and the Chromebook have to be connected to the internet so they can communicate through your Google account. If those two conditions are met, it works reliably and makes things more convenient. Of course, Smart Lock isn't the most secure way to lock your Chromebook (or your phone) but offering something that's fairly secure and easy to use is the best way to get folks to lock their devices.

Let's see how to set it up.

  • Make sure your Chromebook and your Android phone are turned on, signed into the same Google account, unlocked, connected to the internet, and that Bluetooth is enabled on both devices. If you haven't set up Smart Lock for your Android phone, you'll need to do that first. Any of the methods will work. (Also, make sure only one Chromebook and one phone are turned on in Bluetooth range of each.)
  • Open your Chromebook's settings and scroll down to the bottom. Click Show advanced settings. Scroll down about halfway and find Smart Lock for Chromebook, and click the Set up button.
  • Your Chromebook will scan for available Bluetooth devices, and when it finds your Android phone you'll see it listed with a button to use it. Go ahead and click it.
  • On your phone, you'll see a notification that it was found. Open the notification (nothing will appear) to allow the Chromebook and phone to pair with each other over Bluetooth. Then move back to the Chromebook as suggested.
  • A few seconds later you'll see that everything is setup and you're ready to give it a try. Click the button to check it out, and your Chromebook is locked and you can click or tap anywhere on your account picture or click the lock icon to sign in.

Instantly, you'll get an email to your Google account address that lets you know your account has a new device using the Smart Lock feature. If you use a recovery address (and you really should) that address will also get an email. This email tells you which account was used, and which two devices are set up to pass Smart Lock credentials to each other. There's also a link there if you didn't do this yourself and something fishy is afoot.

We'll use device security when it's this easy. That's a win all around.

Smart Lock works with multiple Google accounts, too. As long as all the accounts are signed in on the same phone, your Chromebook can sign in using Smart Lock. For managed accounts (like Google Apps or Google Education accounts) the administrator might have to enable it, depending on the policies in effect.

The same inherent security issues with Smart Lock for your phone apply here. This isn't nearly as safe as signing in manually each time you unlock your Chromebook's screen. And if someone swipes your phone and your Chromebook, they have one more avenue to try and break into your account. If you ever lose your phone or your Chromebook, you should change your Google account password right away. While not bulletproof on the security front, Smart Lock is miles better than not locking your Chromebook at all. Since it's this easy to set up and use, people like us will do it. That's a win for security.

Chromebooks

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1 day ago

Android Central 307: A burning need for Allo

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Audio-only stream below

Apply twice daily and consult Google Assistant if burning persists for longer than a week.

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1 day ago

Google Drive: Ultimate Guide

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How to set up and use Google Drive on Android

How do I use Google Drive on Android?

Google Drive is one of the handiest cloud storage services around, giving you 15GB of free space, which you can access from just about any device with an internet connection. The age of USB thumb drives is over.

When you set up your Android phone, you would have been prompted to add your Google account, which is all you need to use Google Drive. Here's how to set up your personal Google Drive and use some of its main functions.

How to add an account your Google Drive on Android

If you've already set up your Gmail account on your phone, then you'll just have to launch Google Drive and perform steps 1-3 below. If you'd like to add another account, like a work email address, continue on after step 3.

  1. Launch Google Drive from your home screen or from the app drawer.
  2. Tap the next arrow in the bottom right corner through the start screens.
  3. Tap Done in the bottom right corner of your screen.
  4. Tap the menu button in the top left corner of your screen. It looks like ☰.

    Tap the next arrow, tap Done, tap the menu button

  5. Tap the dropdown arrow next to the current account that's associated with your Google Drive.
  6. Tap Add account.
  7. Tap the type of account you'd like to use. You can even use Twitter!

    Tap the dropdown arrow, tap Add account, tap the type of account you want to use

  8. Enter your security measure if you have a pattern lock or PIN lock on your phone.
  9. Enter your email address or login credentials, depending on what type of account you chose to add.
  10. Tap Next.
  11. Type in your Password and tap Next in the bottom right corner.

    Enter your security measure, enter your email address, tap next, enter your password, tap next

  12. Tap Accept.
  13. Tap the circle next to a payment option.
  14. Tap Continue.

    Tap Accept, tap a payment option, tap Continue

The account will now be added to your phone and can be used with other Google apps, like Gmail, Docs, Sheets, and more!

How to upload files to your Google Drive on Android

You can upload Microsoft Word documents, Google Docs, photos from your Gallery, and tons more!

  1. Find the document on your phone that you'd like to upload to Google Drive. In this example, we're using a photo from the Gallery.
  2. Tap the share button. It'll usually look like a left-pointing triangle, with a dot at each point.
  3. Tap Save to Drive.

    Find the document you want to share, tap the share button, tap Save to Drive

  4. Tap Allow if prompted to allow Google Drive access to your files.
  5. Add a title to the document if you'd like and tap Save in the bottom right corner of your screen.

    Tap Allow, add a title if you want, tap Save

Your file will now be uploaded to your Google Drive where you can view it from any device on which you can access Google.

How to view files in your Google Drive on Android

Viewing your files in Google Drive on Android is as easy as launching the app from your home screen or app drawer. That's it! When you launch the app, you'll be brought to your Drive with all of your files right there for you to scroll through and view. Just tap a file to open it.

You can search for files by name by tapping the search icon (usually looks like a magnifying glass) and typing the name of the file you'd like to view.

How to share files from your Google Drive on Android

You can share any file from your Google Drive, either by sending the physical file or by sharing a link that will allow someone to view the file in your Google Drive (they won't be able to see anything else).

  1. Launch Google Drive from your home screen or from the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the file you want share. It looks like three vertical dots.
  3. You have two ways to share your file:
    • Tap Share link to send someone a link to this file in your Google Drive.
    • Tap Send file to send someone the physical file.
  4. Tap a sharing method. You can share files via email, Facebook, messaging, and much more!

    Tap the more button, tap Share link or Send file, tap a sharing method

Now you can just share the file or the link via the method you've chosen normally. If you're sending it as a message, just tap the send button like you would for a text message. If you're sharing it via email, you can add a message and add multiple recipients, just like normal!

How to view files that were shared with you via Google Drive on Android

If you have notifications for Google Drive turned on (which they usually are by default), you can just tap the notification and it'll open right to the file that's been shared with you. If you dismissed the notification by mistake or just didn't get one, here's how to view files that have been shared with you!

  1. Launch Google Drive from your home screen or from the app drawer.
  2. Tap the menu button on the top left of your screen. It looks like ☰.
  3. Tap Shared with me.
  4. Tap the file you'd like to view.

    Tap the menu button, tap Shared with me, tap the file you want to view

How to download a file from Google Drive

If you're transferring files via Google Drive and want to save a hard copy to your phone, you just have to download the file.

  1. Launch Google Drive from your home screen or from the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the bottom right of the file thumbnail. It's the three vertical dots.
  3. Tap Download.

    Launch Google Drive, tap the more button on a file, tap Download

The file will now be downloaded to your phone. You'll receive a notification when it's downloaded, and you can tap that to view it or look in your file storage.

How to check your storage in Google Drive on Android

Google Drive starts you off with 15GB for free, and if you find you're saving a lot to your Google Drive, it's probably best to keep an eye on your storage.

  1. Launch Google Drive from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the menu button on the top left of your screen. It looks like ☰.
  3. Tap Settings.

    Launch Google Drive, tap the menu button, tap Settings

The first item in the Settings list is Storage and beneath it, it'll tell you how much of your 15GB you have used. If you're just using your Drive to save Google Docs, it's going to take you a very long time to fill it up.

How to delete files from your Google Drive on Android

If you do find your Google Drive is getting a bit full because you've been using it to save photos, videos, music, and a ton of other stuff, you can choose to pay to upgrade your storage or take the frugal route and delete some stuff!

  1. Launch Google Drive from your home screen or the app drawer.
  2. Tap the more button on the file you'd like to delete. It's the three vertical dots in the bottom right corner of the thumbnail.
  3. Tap Remove, which is at the bottom of the options.

    Launch Google Drive, tap the more button on a file, tap Remove

The file will now be removed from your Google Drive, but you can always re-upload it if you need to.

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