A sign of the changing ways we're watching television shows

After recent speculation, today the BBC has officially announced its plans to close down BBC Three as a broadcast television station and move it to an online only affair. The move – subject to approval – will reinvent the channel as a BBC iPlayer only offering. Ultimately the closure comes as part of a cost-saving and restructuring effort, but BBC Three was chosen it seems based on its target demographic; the young folks.

The iPlayer is a key part of the future for public service broadcasting. It's the gateway for people who increasingly want to watch and listen to what they want, when they want it - on tablets, on mobiles as well as other screens. I am sure that this is going to be increasingly important for our younger audiences. And reaching those audiences is vital for the BBC.

Besides saving the Beeb the money it obviously needs, it's also a sign of the changing times, of how we're starting to get more and more of our TV content. With the likes of the iPlayer, Netflix, iTunes, Google Play and so on readily available, we're spoiled for choice.

We no longer have to worry about being home to catch our favorite shows, or setting up the DVR to capture it for us. We can pull out our Android phone or tablet and catch up anytie, anywhere, and from a variety of TV channels and content providers.

I am sad BBC Three is leaving the TV, because for more years than I can remember I've tuned in almost every night to watch something. But the times, they are a changing. And kudos to the BBC for continuing to stay up at the front with its online service.

Source: BBC

 
There are 26 comments

darren rees says:

Makes sense the main BBC 3 demographic is pretty techno literate and the only BBC 3 programmes I watch now I found online, first. However I doubt something like Little Britain or Being Human especially would have been so popular if they had started as online only.

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ACADM says:

I'm pretty sure Little Britain started on BBC Radio 4 (as did a lot of classic BBC comedies) and then moved to BBC2.

I'm glad they didn't close BBC4, no other terrestrial channel offers what that channel does. Unlike BBC3 where you can find similar output from the entirety of ITVs channels and Channel 4.

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darren rees says:

Yes little Britain did start on the radio as does a lot of great comedy still.

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Taz89 says:

When you think like that it makes sense, I just wonder will there be some sort of "TV guide" so we know when programme x will be on Iplayer. I don't want to be checking everyday for a certain programme.

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Stadifer says:

Well, that is a start and hopefully some of the major American broadcasting companies start coming on board with this idea as well. Kudos to BBC for being at the forefront.

drokssilva says:

Well, CW has CW seed.

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Sent from inside a cave. Yes, T-Mobile covers caves. N5

Of we pay a TV licence and BBC is part of the public sector shouldn't we have a choice in what they do with channels?

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mondellm says:

If they need more money, why doesn't BBC start selling iPlayer subscriptions to those of us outside the UK? BBC Worldwide with all of its various outlets has shown there is a desire for the programming, especially here in the U.S. Give me a legitimate way to watch Doctor Who besides the limited BBC America experience and I can cut the cable tomorrow.

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Jadien says:

+10000... except I've already cut the cord. Still would be cool to be able to watch this.

ACADM says:

I'm pretty sure it's a rights issue. I think it'll be difficult/extremely expensive to get worldwide online rights to TV and radio programmes.

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veii says:

Probably a handy way to then start taxing anyone with the Internet because they *could* access it online if they wanted to.

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seanjenkins says:

As the above comment eluded to, this is purely a way to close the loophole for people that are currently not paying the disgusting anachronistic TV licence.

I detest the BBC and their appalling scare tactics to rob people of their money even if they don't watch their mostly useless programming.

If the Americans like the BBC so much they're welcome to have them and the £150 a year that they will have no choice in paying them.

Rant over. I feel better now

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Kai Taylor says:

Cheaper then most Americans pay for 3 months.

Nobody is forcing you to pay.

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fuzzylumpkin says:

Is there no free to air/commercial supported TV at all in the US?

Also, yes they are. It's illegal to own a TV without a licence in the UK.

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TonyHoyle says:

Untrue. You can own any TV you like you only need a licence to watch live broadcasts. Currently streaming iPlayer on a TV would not require a licence, provided you never watched anything live on it.

Also, the a part of the fee goes to subsidise the commercial channels so 'I don't watch the BBC' is a crap excuse (and unless you mostly watch game shows and big brother, likely am untrue one).

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ACADM says:

This guy is absolutely correct!

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fuzzylumpkin says:

Yes that's technically accurate (although there is a modern proviso for any device as well as a TV, while the programme is being broadcast). however, if an inspector turns up at your doorstep and you have a TV in your living room, you will almost certainly be taken to court to attempt to prove your innocence.

I never said I didn't watch BBC programmes, and also have no problem with the licence fee, so the second paragraph of your reply to my comment is pointless.

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seanjenkins says:

I don't have any broadcast TV coming into the house. I'm hoping not to renew when my current license expires. I believe this is part of a plan for the bbc to close the loophole. Moving a channel into iplayer only helps this further. A android comments section probably not the best place to debate this but I feel many are starting to question the validity of the BBC, especially as their profiteering endeavours which we were previously unaware are becoming more apparent

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seanjenkins says:

Yes they are. It's illegal not to
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(unless you have no aerial coming into the property. For now)

Get rid of all the BBC channel. And the licence fee

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bez54 says:

+1

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ACADM says:

No thanks.

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fuzzylumpkin says:

Here's hoping we get chromecast support (probably an official UK release would be needed first) in the iPlayer app before this happens.

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bez54 says:

F... the BBC. I get charged up the ars3 for something a hardly use. Opt out option not to pay. I watch top gear and that is it. And yet I have to pay year on year. And the bbc is full of pedo's. Aaaaarrrhhhhh!

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ACADM says:

No you don't.

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seanjenkins says:

Yes he does.

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