Platform Versions for April 2014

KitKat doubles its share of active installs in just a month

Google has released its monthly report on active Android devices and their software version, and as you'd expect things are moving towards the latest releases. Android 2.2 is present on just 1.1 percent of devices accessing Google Play, down from 1.2 percent last month, while Honeycomb is still at its lonely 0.1 percent.

Gingerbread is holding down a sizable 17.8 percent, but that's down from 19 percent this time last month. Android 4.0, 4.1 and 4.3 all dropped slightly, but gains on Android 4.2 and 4.4 made modern versions (Ice Cream Sandwich and above) as a whole grow to over 80 percent for the first time.

Android 4.2 gained one percentage point to 18.1 percent of active devices. KitKat makes the jump over the 5 percent (5.3 percent to be exact) mark for the first time, a dramatic jump to over double the 2.5 percent we saw a month earlier.

As we usually point out with these numbers, the process of moving devices and users over to newer versions of Android is a slow one — but at least things are steadily heading in the right direction again.

Source: Android Developers

 

Reader comments

Android 4.4 now 5.3 percent of active devices, 4.x over 80 percent

53 Comments

At least KitKat is getting somewhere. I'm surprised the most at the JellyBean decline happening so soon. I expected the decline to happen later by at least late 2014/early 2015.

I don't understand how Gingerbread is still this strong in the market. Do people really have no money to buy newer Android phones?

Also have to consider how long gingerbread phones were still being sold. My friend got one on contract ridiculously cheap mind just under a year ago

Posted via Android Central App

Yeah I was shocked that Carphone Warehouse still stocked what was a very old phone on contract. He's starting to notice the limitations and in secret regret his decision I think

Posted via Android Central App

Probably a combination of scores of people with A) No money to upgrade B) No desire to upgrade, which in many cases stems from C) a complete lack of knowledge of which Android version they are running and the benefits to upgrading. There is a large portion of the general population that just don't know or care what version of OS their phone is running, or even what the newest version of said OS even is. You'd be surprised at how many people HATE doing updates to their phones and will ignore prompts to update when given the option...I've seen it from several friends and co-workers over the years, especially those of older generations and the non-tech savvy.

Forget Gingerbread, WTF are people still doing on Honeycomb!!! HAHAHAHA, seriously, UPGRADE you cheap a$$es!!! get off your 5yr old flip phone and get into 2014 for once

Honeycomb was only for tablets, and any tablet not upgraded by now is probably not getting an upgrade.

Posted via Android Central App

A *LOT* of Honeycomb tablets were NOT eligible to upgrade to Jellybean, sadly :-( T.I. chips I think and some other stuff I don't remember on the tech front. Not the users fault!

Maybe its Bullshit for you but not for those million people's who cant afford your shiny 500$ phone's. btw $49 is price of unlocked pay as you use on prepaid .

Honestly, I'm in no hurry to update to KitKat on my Galaxy Note3. Especially from all the reported problems. JellyBean is working just fine on my Note3....Don't want to interfer with AWESOMENESS...SMILE

That would have been funny if the note 3 and s4 were not on kk already

Posted via Android Central App on nexus 7 (2nd gen)

No HTC was still getting kk out while Samsung was rolling theirs out, in the US.

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You really should see the crap I don't post. Sorry if honesty offends you

+1

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You really should see the crap I don't post. Sorry if honesty offends you

Freaking Honeycomb! It refuses to die. Nice to see KitKat over 5%. I got it this month on my phone. Go KitKat!!!

Posted via My Awesome LG G2

You can also thank Moto G's success in Europe, Brazil, and India for propelling KitKat. Markets that used to had Gingerbread-Samsung majority now have KitKat thanks to the Moto budget phone.

You want to know why GB won't die? Because, last time I looked, Straight Talk was still selling phones with it. I'm sure other low-budget providers are doing the same thing. And, since these carriers are marketing to people trying to save money, those customers are less likely to upgrade their phones as quickly as those on more expensive carriers. In addition, these folks may not realize or even care that they're having very old technology sold to them since, to many people, a phone is a phone.

Posted via Android Central App

Indeed. I just upgraded my mother in law to jelly bean. Gave her my old xperia s. She was still running my old Nokia N95 on an ancient symbian version.... I think that phone was over 6 years old.
Posted via Android Central App

Google should require submitted apps to be designed to work on 4.0 and better.
That would force all these gingerbread users to get a clue. Just like all the people still using windows XP.
The moto G is for people who can't afford $600 phones. There is no reason for anyone to still be using gingerbread.

No it will just turn them off to Android. What good is a phone with no apps?

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You really should see the crap I don't post. Sorry if honesty offends you

Not everyone can afford to buy a $600 to $700 phone and some just prefer to spend their hard earned cash for more important things.

Posted via Android Central App

Two reasons why kitkat is so low:

1) carriers and their stupid authorization processes take forever!

2) cheaper handsets in other countries run older versions of Android

Posted via Android Central App

I'm kinda confused with the sd card issue with kitkat update. I've a galaxy note 2 and sd card slot was the reason I went for it over nexus 4 last year.

Posted via Android Central App

Nishant,

Basically in KitKat Google implemented what I believe to be a good (Although admittedly annoying) security improvement, where by it stopped any old app being able to write things to the SD card in places such as /music /photos etc. Jerry wrote a very good blog article explaining it to people here http://www.androidcentral.com/kitkat-sdcard-changes there was also an opinion piece where he explains why it's a good thing but I can't find it after a quick check of the site (Although I admit I'm pushed for time and not looked too hard) Hope this helps