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Google Search lets you keep up with the latest updates on your favorite topics

Google search for Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore on a Galaxy Z Fold 3
(Image credit: Nicholas Sutrich / Android Central)

What you need to know

  • A new "notifications" tab has appeared on the Google Search app on iOS.
  • This new tab contains updated searches based on topics that you subscribe to.
  • Product and informational searches can be subscribed to by searching on Google, then tapping the bell icon next to the product name.

Some iOS users have noticed that a new "notifications" tab has appeared on their Google Search app, signaling that Google is testing a new feature by rolling it out to a few users at a time. This new tab includes notifications for search updates on products you've registered an interest with, which could be handy if you're waiting on finding out when a product releases or when the next update might land.

Spotted first by 9to5Google (opens in new tab), the tab seems to only be available on some iOS Google Search apps for the time being. Having a dedicated tab for these subscribed search topics would make it easy to follow particular products or events, whether it's news coverage or the latest movie release.

Subscribing to a search is simple enough, although it's not immediately clear how many different topics or products the feature supports at this time. If you search for a particular topic or product on your phone — for instance, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness — you'll see a red notification bell to the right of the title of the movie. Clicking that will subscribe to the topic and deliver notifications based on any new information that's available in the future.

It's not clear where this particular tab would be on the best Android phones (opens in new tab), but it's possible that Google will build this into Google Assistant or the Google app itself. Google recently announced that it was sunsetting the Snapshot tab (opens in new tab) in the Google app, so it's possible that it will replace that once it's been removed.


Nicholas Sutrich
Nicholas Sutrich
Nick started with DOS and NES and uses those fond memories of floppy disks and cartridges to fuel his opinions on modern tech. Whether it's VR, smart home gadgets, or something else that beeps and boops, he's been writing about it since 2011. Reach him on Twitter or Instagram @Gwanatu