Android 3.x - Honeycomb - Featured Articles

ZTE Optik

ZTE Optik review (Sprint)

The ZTE Optik is a nice little surprise from Sprint. It's an unassuming but well-built and well-running 7-inch Honeycomb tablet that runs on Sprint's 3G network, and it is probably one of the better devices nobody has heard much about. With no gimmicks like a digital stylus or a foldable keyboard...
Team Viewer for Meetings

TeamViewer for Meetings updated with VoIP support

The folks at Teamviewer have pushed out quite the update for their TeamViewer for Meetings app, bringing some minor bug fixes, full hardware acceleration for Honeycomb and Ice Cream Sandwich tablets, and VoIP support. VoIP support on top of the already excellent Teleconferencing application really...
ZTE optik

ZTE Optik getting a minor update, brings some fixes and enhancements

Sprint is pushing out a small update for the 7-inch ZTE Optik today, bringing a few welcome bug fixes to the tablet and some decent software enhancements. According to the official changelog, we should be seeing the following: Google DRM solution Google Music Google+ Persistent...

Android 3.x - Honeycomb - Photos

Android 3.x - Honeycomb RSS Feed

When the Android 3.1 update was announced for the 3G enabled Motorola Xoom, some WiFi only Xoom owners were a little upset at having to wait, even if only a little bit. However, some actually received the update that day despite Motorola stating it would be happening in the coming weeks. And now, Motorola has announced that the Android 3.1 update is slowly being rolled out in phases. If you already received it -- awesome (and snag the manual download location)! If not, sit tight and take satisfaction in knowing it's coming sooner rather than later.

Source: @Motorola

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Matias Duarte and the rest of the Android UI designers got together to spend an hour or so to talk about how they went about changing elements for Honeycomb's "Holo" UI, and how developers should go about designing apps to keep things looking fresh and like they all belong together.  It's the little things that make a big difference, like setting up your action bar elements in a sane order, and sticking things that look out of place in the secondary menu.  Things are getting pretty geeky, with code snippets being tossed around, but for you and I, this all means apps that look as good as they run.  This is why they gave all the developers a nice tablet, and are taking the time to give direction -- the folks at Google want nice looking apps as much as we do.

There was a lot of talk about the action bar, and how to use it effectively.  Everything from how and where the icons should go, and a whole new api to go along with it.  Finally, using the Google I/O app as an example (which has been open sourced just for this occasion), the crew showed us all how to translate tabs, the action bar and fragments so that an app only has to be written once to look (and work) well on both tablets and phones. I can't wait to see what Android developers come up with after this one.

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We're sitting in on the Google TV session this afternoon at Google IO and just got our first look at Android 3.1 Honeycomb on the platform. Announced during the Day 1 keynote on Tuesday, Honeycomb on Google TV will bring full Android compatibility at the 12-foot level. That means full Android access on your TV, including Android applications and the full Android Market.

In addition, Google TV will gain full ADB support -- meaning devs can debug, and hackers can hack. There's an SDK add-on in the works (no word on when we'll see it just yet), and there will be additional television-specific functionality.

Much of the talk consisted of how devs will need to handle the resolution and pixel density on something as large as a television. The main difference between Google TV and Android on a phone, at least from a UI perspective, is that you hold a phone a foot or so away from your peepers, while a TV is across the room, thus the "12-foot view."

Honeycomb will also be able to handle the inevitable screen clipping that can occur when switching from HD to standard-def content.

Other news out of the session:

  • For the obvious reasons, users won't be rotating their screens. Devs need to remember this.
  • Apps will need to optimized for navigation via the D-pad, and not touch.
  • Right now, devs can run apps in the Honeycomb emulator.
  • A Google TV emulator is coming soon.
  • ADB access is coming later this summer, but devs can get early access through the Fishtank Program.
  • The Android Market has a nice 12-foot view. (Pic via Jason Howell)
  • NDK apps are not supported on Google TV.
  • Neither are apps that use the camera, microphone or other sensors.
  • Source code for the Google TV remote app is being released under the Apache 2 license.

Developing ...

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News is quickly spreading that the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 units given away to Google IO attendees yesterday are completely unlocked and ripe for all sorts of hackery, including quick and easy rooting. If you're among the lucky few to have your hands on one of these desirable devices, all you need to do to gain root access is push a zip file over ADB, reboot into recovery mode and run your newly-transferred file.

That's it -- no trickery or black magic, just a few lines at a command prompt and your Tab is rooted. Hit the source link for the download, along with full step-by-step instructions. We'll be crossing our fingers over the next month, and hoping that retail units are just as developer-friendly as the devices handed out at IO.

Source: AllDroid

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Motorola has officially announced the Android 3.1 update rolling out to Verizon Xoom owners this week, first detailed by Google yesterday in San Francisco. Improvements will include:

  • Support for the new Android Market movie rentals service with thousands of titles available for immediate viewing on the Motorola XOOM’s high-resolution display or on a larger screen via HDMI
  • Full support for the final release of Adobe® Flash® Player 10.2, delivering significant performance enhancements when viewing rich Flash content on the web
  • Resizable widgets to enable further customization of home screens
  • Support for USB-connected peripherals and accessories, such as keyboards, mice, game controllers and digital cameras
  • Expanded Bluetooth features to support Bluetooth headsets in Google Talk™ video chats and Bluetooth mouse support in addition to additional shortcut keys with the Bluetooth keyboard
  • Picture Transfer Protocol Feature support to enable easier transfer of photo files to your PC without the need for drivers

While some have already received the update, Motorola says that the new and improved Honeycomb will be rolling out to Verizon customers throughout the week, with the WiFi version and “other variants” of the Xoom receiving the update “in the next few weeks.” Hit the source link for Motorola’s official press release.

Source: Motorola Mobility Media Center

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Android 3.1 Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich, Google Music Beta, Movie rentals on the Android Market and a new milestone for daily Android activations. There was a whole lot of cool stuff packed into the Google I/O day one keynote, not to mention shiny new Galaxy Tabs for attendees.

Now you can relive the excitement and catch up on any details you might've missed, as Google has just uploaded a full video of the I/O 2011 day one keynote to YouTube. The keynote runs for 54 minutes, and is available for your viewing pleasure after the jump.

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With the announcement today of Android 3.1 rolling out to Verizon Xoom owners today, Google has gone ahead and updated the Android SDK to reflect the changes as well. If you're working on some Android applications and want to make sure you're totally up to date with all the available offerings, fire up your SDK and grab the Android 3.1 add-on.

There is quite few API changes in this latest release, most of which revolve around USB connectivity and USB host options as well as the freshly announced Android Open Accessory system. The full change log is available via the Android Developers website. Be sure to check it out for a full, complete breakdown.

Source: Android Developers

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We've gotten a few e-mails from you folks out there worried about why the new Adobe Reader update needs permission to read your gmail. Sounds scary, eh? Not really. Just as we expected, it's so the app can open up PDFs from within gmail. Adobe's gone back and added it into the app description, which now reads:

Permissions to read Gmail and default email client - Enables users to open Gmail and default Email client PDF attachments using Adobe Reader only when users select the application to view PDF files. This permission is required because of a known limitation with the Android platform.

So the sky is not falling, folks. Oh, and the real reason we care about this update? It now works with Honeycomb. You can update at your leisure.

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Out of the fat an into the fryer. We're fresh from the Google IO Day 1 keynote -- maybe you caught our liveblog -- and we're in the press briefing room for, well a press briefing. We're already spotting some names and faces -- Matias Duarte is sitting next to yours truly.

No liveblog for this one, but we'll update with any happenings after the break.

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Youtube link for mobile viewing

This isn't the first time we've seen the upcoming Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1-inch Honeycomb tablet. But tonight at a pre-Google IO event in San Francisco, we got our first look at one actually turned on. And Honeycomb is still Honeycomb. But it definitely feels a little faster than what we've come to know on the Motorola Xoom. And the hardware is still markedly lighter than the Xoom, and thinner, too.

And we've got one more month before we can all get the Wifi version of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in our hot little hands. Anybody else excited yet?

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Although it's been quite some time since we heard rumblings from Samsung about the Galaxy Tab 10.1 it appears their marketing teams are now looking to once again shake up interest in the 10.1-inch tablet. The registration page is up on the Samsung website, accessible to anyone who is looking to stay up-to-date on the when and where's of how to purchase the yet to be released Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 that hits stores June 8.

We've already given it a look or two already in the past but we'll gladly give it another go come closer to release. If you're wanting to stay in the loop, hit the source link for more details and sign up to be notified of its release -- or, you could just take Jerry's blatant NSFW word for how good he thinks it is.

Source: Samsung

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We know everyone out there likes to indulge in some rumors here and there, so walk with us for a moment while we take a brief look at the HTC Puccini. A 10-Inch, Honeycomb tablet that looks well -- like every other Honeycomb tablet out there to date. So what sets this tablet apart from all the others?

We'll start with the connectivity options since it's rumored to be making use of LTE powered by AT&T. Yes, it will be making use of AT&T's real 4G network when released. Plus, considering it is an HTC tablet it's also suggested to be making use of HTC Scribe technology so that fancy pen from HTC Flyer may be usable on more then one device if this tablet comes to market.

The rest of details still remain a mystery for this device but -- we're pretty sure we'll hear more eventually. These things always have a tendency to be unwrapped ahead of schedule on a much grander scale.

Source: PocketNow

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From the looks of the image above, it appears as though Target will begin selling the Wifi-only version of the Motorola Xoom tablet in the coming days. Functional displays have hit some stores already, and inventory is rolling in, so it looks like we can add Target to the list of places where you'll be able to snag yourself a Xoom.

Thanks, anon!

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It was less than two weeks ago that we predicted the major Twitter app developers would soon (but not soon enough) be unleashing Honeycomb apps for Android tablets. Here, friends, is one of the first. We've gotten a sneak peek at Seesmic's upcoming Honeycomb Twitter client and present it to you here.

All in all, we're not overly surprised by the GUI. It's using the fragments that make up a big part of the Honeycomb experience -- basically the ability to bring more information to a larger screen. In the example above, Seemic founder and CEO Loic Le Meur tweeted about the Air France Flight 447 crash. The tweet included a link via ping.fm (which Seesmic bought last year) to the boingboing article, and we see the page loaded in a fragment on the right. And presumably other content will at least be previewed that way, too.

We're not going to read too much more into these screen shots (there's one more after the break) just yet, except to say that this is just the beginning of the Honeycomb Twitter apps, folks, and Seesmic has previously said publicly that we'll get a look at its app next week at Google IO.

More: Take our annual Twitter client poll

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RSS reader Taptu has been updated to version 1.4, bringing with it optimization for Honeycomb tablets. The app uses Fragment API which allows Taptu to run on optimally on both Android smartphones and tablets. The app allows you to import 100 RSS feeds from your Google reader account, up from the 30 allowed in previous versions. The new version retains Taptu's “StreamStore” feature, allowing users to browse for new streams directly from the app. Other improvements in version 1.4 include:

  • Themes: You can change the color theme from dark text on a white background to white text on a background for better reading day or night.
  • Full screen reading: You can read articles in full-screen mode instead of a tabbed look.
  • Instapaper support: If you don't have time to read an article right now, you can send it to your Instapaper account to read it later.

Taptu says that its tablet optimization allows for a full screen immersive experience with smoother transitions and faster scrolling, made possible by your device's hardware acceleration. Hit the link after the break to download now.

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Google Earth version 2.0 is now available in the Android Market, bringing with it optimization for Honeycomb-powered tablets. Google says that the app now takes full advantage of tablets’ large screens and advanced processing power, with a few new features in tow, including a new action bar with access to search, my location, layers, and reset-to-north.

Utilizing the large screen real estate, users can now explore fully-textured 3D buildings while browsing user photos on the side, just one of the experiences that was formerly limited to the desktop version only. If you're toting a tablet and want to take it for a spin around the world, hit the link after the break to download the update.

Source: Google Mobile Blog

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Our newest example of Photoshop excellence comes to us courtesy of Staples, which just sent out an email with a Honeycomb toting Barnes & Noble Nook Color and as you may know, the Nook Color just received an update to Froyo last week. Staples is relatively new to the tablet selling-game and it definitely shows with this howler, unless Staples happens to be rooting Nooks and flashing an Android 3.0 ROM on there for us.

Thanks to everyone who sent this in!

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While it's still unofficial -- former Google CEO Eric Schmidt went out of his way to not name it during his keynote address at Mobile World Congress -- it's hardly a secret that the next named version of Android will have something to do with Ice Cream. And it looks like "Ice Cream Sandwich" -- a name that has been rumored for months -- is starting to firm up, according to a Googler's reply on the AOSP issues forum.

The "I" version of Android will bring together features of Gingerbread and Honeycomb, Schmidt said in February. Anybody think we're going to see it unveiled next week at Google IO?

Source: AOSP issues forum; Thanks, Yuankai!

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Adobe has posted an update to Flash Player 10.2 to the Android Market, which marks the Honeycomb version's exit from beta, as well as fixing some Flash security issues across all supported versions of Android. The update also paves the way for Honeycomb to get hardware-accelerated playback of 720p HD video and "enhanced browser integration", though unfortunately these features won't be usable until a "future update" to Android 3.0 is released.

Hit the Market to grab the new version 10.2.157.51 if you already have Flash installed. If not, you can find a QR code and Market link after the jump.

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When is the ASUS EeePad Transformer, one of the hottest Honeycomb tablets available, not actually one of the hottest Honeycomb tablets available? (Read our full review) When it's shipped still running some pre-release firmware identified as Android 2.2. Craziness!

That's what happened to moago, who was lucky enough snag one at launch this week, only to find it not running Honeycomb. That sort of thing, of course, attracts hackers and nerds (and us hacker/nerd/journalist types) like Donald Trump to a camera, and hijinx ensue.

So congrats to moago for getting that little treasure, and good luck getting it updated. For the rest of you, once you're actually able to get the Transformer, you'll just have to be content with having the newest version of Android. Life's tough like that.

Source: My Transformer came with Android 2.2; Photobucket. Thanks, graffixnyc!

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