CM Privacy Guard 2.0 UI

Granular control over permissions for each app with a simplified control interface

The latest versions of CyanogenMod 10.2 will include new improvements to the Privacy Guard app, giving you better control over apps and their permissions. CM's Privacy Guard app lets users manage which apps have access to which permissions in the system, not only surfacing exactly what apps are doing but giving you control of what information you share voluntarily.

With the move to Privacy Guard 2.0, CM is integrating something called "AppOps" which Google introduced with Android 4.3. AppOps gives the system the ability to revoke permissions and return empty data sets when permissions are denied for an app. The new Privacy Guard with AppOps will let you simply toggle off individual permissions for location, reading contacts, SMS/MMS and more.

You'll also now receive notifications when using an app that has permissions blocked, as well as several other good UI tweaks to make the accessing of permissions a little easier. The new improvements to Privacy Guard 2.0 were added to CM 10.2 last night, and will be available for those builds going forward.

Source: +CyanogenMod

 

Reader comments

CyanogenMod updating to Privacy Guard 2.0 with new features, coming to CM 10.2

22 Comments

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Long overdue. "AppOps" is something that really needs to be pushed into every release. We just can't trust app permissions any more.

Great to see CM being proactive.

I have been enjoying something similar to this with AOKP. It will be important to have the option to allow the privacy guard to be enabled automatically for installed apps, which I can do with SlimRoms.

This is something stock (non-rooted) Android actually lags behind iOS imo. Sure you are allowed to see the permissions, but iOS actually have a specific organized menu dedicated to 'privacy' (ie. pseudo).

Are you kidding? CM has been around almost since the beginning and is extremely well known in the community. I don't think their name is an issue.

If that's the case, then this guy needs to go back to preschool and re-learn how to pronounce things. It's not like you should look at this and see an overly complicated word. It's "app" followed by "ops", not "oops" or "opes" (long o sound). Ops. Like black ops.

They don't have to... They are famous.... Cy-no-gen-mod..

However Toyoda did change their name to Toyota Motors for some reason.

As an app developer I'm not at all looking forward to users blaming the apps for crashing because of permissions they revoked.

Posted via Android Central App

It sounds to me, that they don't really revoke it but just return default or empty data? For example if some app wants to have access to the adrenal address book then they just get an empty list back?

Posted via Android Central App

I have never had apps crashing from revoking permission. Of course, if a purchased app required internet permission to verify that its purchased, and the user revoke internet permission to that app, then the app wouldn't run, but that's logical.

Almost as safe as stable release with maybe negligible bugs just as stable release.

Posted via Android Central App