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4 days ago

You will soon be able to add stickers to liven up your Twitter photos

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Twitter will soon begin rolling out a new feature to its iOS and Android apps, along with Twitter.com, that will allow for adding stickers to any uploaded photos in a post.

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4 days ago

Best roaming plans for Canadians travelling to the U.S.

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Here are the best ways to save money when taking your phone to the U.S.!

Millions of Canadians visit the U.S. every year and, with nearly every pocket protecting a smartphone and its data plan, they increasingly want to maintain the same quality of service they have at home. Thankfully, roaming options have not only proliferated over the past few years but, due to competition at home and abroad, plans have become significantly cheaper.

Here are the best ones.

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4 days ago

Sony unleashes the Xperia XA in the UK

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Sony has announced the company's Xperia XA handset is now available in the UK on networks other than O2. Sony had previously released the Xperia XA on O2 on June 23, but today you'll be able to find the handset from the likes of Carphone Warehouse, Three, Virgin, and more.

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4 days ago

Best UK roaming data plans for Europe

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EU flag

The best options for getting online in Europe this summer — without breaking the bank.

Whether it's a well-deserved annual holiday, a quick weekend break or a business trip, millions of Brits will find themselves travelling to continental Europe this year. And for most of us, that means navigating the mess of roaming deals offered by the UK's mobile networks — not all of which are great value.

So if you're frustrated by the maze of data bundles, plug-ins, add-ons and whatnots, then we've sifted through everything to bring you a plain English guide to EU roaming. Read on.

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4 days ago

Best roaming plans for Canadians travelling to Europe

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Planning a trip to Europe? Here are your best options for roaming while taking in the sights, the sounds — or the Seine!

Whether you want to get in some skiing, go backpacking, or hit the winding — and sometimes high-velocity — roads, Europe is an amazing travel destination for Canadians. Roaming in countries like France, Germany, Spain, Portugal and the United Kingdom can be expensive if you don't know which options to choose. Be smart with these great roaming services.

KnowRoaming

KnowRoaming has created a sticker that, using a special tool included in the box, adheres to the underside of a regular SIM card. Once the now-double SIM gets put back of your iPhone or Android Phone, the magic begins. With its free iOS or Android apps, KnowRoaming acts both as a director of information, determining which SIM card needs to be used depending on the phone's location, and as a full-service MVNO in nearly every country in Europe.

For $7.99 USD per day, KnowRoaming offers unlimited roaming data in a number of European countries, including France, Germany, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, Portugal, Netherlands and more.

Better, it can also automatically forward a Canadian number to its European equivalent, giving KnowRoaming customers the option of making and receiving calls as they would back home.

What to know: KnowRoaming is smart: it assigns a local number whenever it enters a new country, and its excellent iOS or Android apps track call, text and data usage. 3G-only (for now).

Unlocked iPhone or Android Phone needed

See at KnowRoaming

Roamer

Technically, Roamer is an Android app that intelligently forwards your home number to a European equivalent so you can make and receive calls as you would back in Canada. But a little-known side of the business is the Roamer SIM — a single card that connects to the best local carriers in 118 countries, including many in Europe.

While prices are slightly higher than they are on KnowRoaming, it is still significantly cheaper than many roaming plans purchased from a Canadian carrier. To wit, traveling to France offers the following:

  • 1 day / €5 / 50MB
  • 7 days / €15 / 300MB
  • 7 days / €25 / 1GB
  • 14 days / €50 / 1GB

The beauty of Roamer SIM is that the company delivers to Canadian (or U.S.) addresses, which means it can be configured prior to leaving. Simply put the SIM in your Android phone and enable it once on the ground in Europe.

What to know: Roamer assigns a local number for every country visited, and usage can be tracked with the free Android app. Phone calls and texts are extra, but still cheap. First 25MB of data is free.

Unlocked iPhone or Android Phone needed

See at Roamer

Buy a local SIM

This option may seem obvious, but it's also the most onerous. Many Western European countries such as Spain, Germany, Italy, and France have a number of core carriers, such as Vodafone, T-Mobile and Orange, along with dozens of MVNOs (Mobile Virtual Network Operators) that resell access to those core networks.

Most of the core carriers and MVNOs offer prepaid access, and are some of the least expensive ways to get a local number and cheap data in a foreign country.

There are a few things to keep in mind before purchasing a local SIM card in a European country:

  • European networks use different wireless bands than Canadian and U.S. carriers. Most carriers in Western Europe use a combination of 800 / 900 / 1800 / 2100 / 2600 Mhz, so make sure that you check your unlocked Android phone for compatibility.
  • Many prepaid SIM cards require activation through SMS or a web-based portal, and by default use the local language. Make sure when purchasing, you get the store clerk to activate the SIM, or ask how to change the default language to one of your choice.
  • Make sure that, should you need more data, you have a way to do so without requiring a European credit card. This is especially important if you plan on moving from a big city to more rural areas where topping up at a store is not possible.
  • If you're going to be moving between countries, ask when purchasing whether the carrier has European roaming options. Some carriers have deals with other networks that make it cheap, or free, to roam on partner networks in neighbouring or nearby countries.

What to know: Discover the best networks in the country you're visiting with this helpful European roaming Wiki.

Unlocked iPhone or Android phone needed

Use your own SIM card

In recent years, Canadian carriers have become more serious about European roaming. Spurred by Rogers' Roam Like Home, today all three major Canadian carriers offer cheap or discounted European roaming packages.

Rogers Roam Like Home

The OG roaming package, Rogers Roam Like Home charges customers $10 per day, up to a maximum of 10 days or $100 per billing cycle, to access their Share Everything plan in most European countries.

Say, for example, you have a Share Everything plan (all of which include unlimited calls and texts) with 2.5GB of monthly data. In any Roam Like Home-supported country, your smartphone will tap into that data allotment while roaming. There are no separate data buckets or fees. After 10 days of travel, that $10 daily fee is waived.

What to know: Overage fees still apply after 10 days of travel, so be careful about using too much data while abroad, and download the MyRogers app to stay on top of data usage. Enroll by texting travel to 222.

See at Rogers

Bell

Bell recently expanded its Roam Better service to include dozens of countries around the world, including many in Europe.

Similar to its U.S.-based roaming option, Roam Better allows travellers to spend a set amount per day — in this case, $10 — for unlimited calls and texts in that country, plus 100MB of data. Unlike Roam Like Home, Roam Better doesn't eat into a customer's existing domestic data bucket. On the other hand, it can get pricey, since 100MB is easy to chew through while loading maps and learning about the city.

What to know: After 100MB is used, Bell automatically sends a text message asking whether you want to opt-in to another 100MB of data for $10. Data expires at 11:59pm Eastern Time regardless of where you're roaming, so be careful; most European countries are between five and eight hours ahead of EST, which means the count will reset in the early hours of the morning. Enroll by texting ROAM to 7626.

See at Bell

Telus bundles

Telus hasn't extended its Easy Roam product to Europe just yet, so travellers to the continent are best to look elsewhere. Bundles include:

  • Europe Combo Pass $50: 50 minutes, 150 texts, 150MB
  • Europe Combo Pass $85: 75 minutes, 300 texts, 750MB
  • Europe Combo Pass $150: 200 minutes, unlimited texts, 1.5GB

All passes are valid for 30 days.

What to know: Because Telus doesn't offer a European equivalent of US Easy Roam, it's very important to either get a bundle before leaving, or turn off roaming completely. Pay-per-use rates for Europe are exorbitant, at $1.50 per call minute, $0.60 per text, and $5.00 per MB data.

See at Telus

Your turn!

Is your carrier not listed? Check with them to see if they have inexpensive daily, weekly, or monthly European travel bundles. Have roaming experiences or tips to share? Leave them in in the comments!

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4 days ago

India's $4 smartphone will start shipping later this week

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Earlier this year, India's Ringing Bells caused quite a stir when it announced that it would be coming out with a smartphone for the equivalent of $4 (₹251). After allegations of fraud, which led to an investigation by the government, the company is finally ready to ship the handset. Ringing Bells founder and CEO Mohit Goel has announced that over 200,000 units of the Freedom 251 will start going out to pre-ordered customers from June 30.

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5 days ago

Google reportedly working to launch in-house developed phone later this year

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With the Nexus program, Google partners with several companies in creating phones and tablets that deliver a "pure" Android experience. According to The Telegraph, it looks like Google is set to release its own phone developed internally with more control over the "design, manufacturing and software" that doesn't involve a partnership with a well-known brand.

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5 days ago

Meizu m3 note review: Could've been better

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Meizu m3 Note

The quick take

After decent budget packages, the m1 note and m2 note, the m3 note from Meizu is quite an aberration from the predecessors, and aims to pack in solid internals in a stylish chassis. There are a few highlights like design and build quality with extended battery life, yet it fails to impress in overall performance.

The Good

  • Design and build quality
  • Flyme OS with mTouch
  • Battery life

The Bad

  • Average camera performance
  • No FM radio
  • Android Lollipop

About this review

I used the Indian retail variant of the Meizu m3 note that ran Flyme OS running on top of Android Lollipop 5.1 out of the box. For most of the time, I used it with an Airtel 4G SIM in Delhi NCR.

Meizu m3 note Design

The Meizu m3 note features a metal body, a pleasant departure from the plastic finish of its predecessors. The subtly curved rear panel looks quite nice and aids the grip. The design of the m3 note is clearly inspired from the iPhone 6 – it's ordinary, but pleasant to look at and exudes premium style. Crafted out of aluminum, the all-metal smartphone feels great in the hand. The 2.5D curved display is a nice touch, and makes the phone thinner on the edges improving the handling.

At 153.6 x 75.5 x 8.2mm, the Meizu m3 note is a tad bigger and a few grams heavier than its predecessor but it sports a thoughtful design, and is nicely built. It's not light, but boasts of a solid construction. Having used Meizu devices since a while, I quite like the mTouch home button. It's practical for navigation and now doubles up as a fingerprint sensor.

Meizu m3 note Hardware

Powered by the Helio P10 octa-core processor with 3GB of RAM, the m3 note does okay for a mid-range smartphone. The Mali-T860 MP2 GPU is uninspiring though and throttles the overall performance. It's got enough punch to handle everyday usage, but is definitely behind the curve and should've been better. There are occasional hangs and crashes, and I couldn't pin it to Flyme OS or sluggish hardware. Things aren't too bad, but like I said, if it was better, I would've had no doubts recommending this phone. Now, I'm not sure if it's the right choice for a power user.

Category Features Operating System Android Lollipop with Flyme UI Display 5.5-inch Full HD (1080 x 1920) IPS LCD Processor MediaTek Helio P10 octa-core Cortex-A53 processor (4x1.8GHz + 4x1.0GHz) RAM 3GB Internal Storage 16GB; expandable via a microSD slot Rear Camera 13MP with two-tone LED flash Front Camera 5MP Dimensions 153.6 x 75.5 x 8.2mm Weight 163 grams Battery 4100 mAh

The Meizu m3 note does the basics well. The reception bars were full and it held onto signal – even in low network spots – and the call quality is good as well. There's no FM Radio or NFC though, and the former is a no go for a lot of users in India.

The m3 note also incorporates a fingerprint sensor within its single hardware key – the mTouch button - on the front. It works good enough, and I prefer it over a fingerprint sensor on the back like most mid-range smartphones.

Meizu m3 note Display

The Meizu m3 note sports a 5.5-inch Full HD IPS display with a 2.5D curved glass design. The latter makes the phone look a little thinner improving the aesthetics while removing the sharp edges. There's also the Dinorex T2X-1 scratch-resistant glass protecting the display.

The display is a mixed bag of sorts. The colors are bright and vibrant, but the contrast isn't the best. However, the 1080p display with 403ppi is sharp enough and looks pretty good for its price. The viewing angles too are just average. Sunlight legibility is poor since the screen is quite reflective and on most occasions outdoors, you'll be able to barely see what's on your screen.

Overall, the display combined with the design makes the m3 note a very good looking phone on first glance. There are definite misses on the display but most of them are what most users won't complain about.

Meizu m3 note Software

The Meizu m3 note runs Flyme OS on top of outdated Android Lollipop 5.1. Surprisingly for an Android phone, the standard Google apps are missing, and you have to head to the Google Play Store to download them. It's an additional step, and not much of a drawback.

Flyme OS offers pretty straightforward user experience. Once you've gotten your bearings, you find Flyme OS to be very fluid and responsive aided by the mTouch navigation paradigm that we've seen before in Meizu devices.

There's a unique home key without the usual capacitive buttons or the on-screen keys to go along with it. The home key can register both touch responses as well as presses. So if you are in the settings menu for example, touching the key would take you back one step backward and pressing it would take you back to the home screen. It's seamless without any hiccups. mTouch button brings added functionality but could be confusing at first if you're coming from traditional Android experience with three navigation buttons. Once you get a hang of it, and of course you will, you'll be at home using mTouch experience with Flyme OS.

Flyme OS supports multi-view offering split-screen viewing, although it's limited to only a few apps like News, Video, Settings, Documents, and Smart Voice. Hopefully, this list will grow with the next software updates. There's also Gesture wake up to allow pre-defined gestures to launch different apps while your phone is asleep as well as a Do Not Disturb mode that blocks notifications and calls while you can set a whitelist of numbers that can get through. There's also a helpful Toolbox app that packs utilities like a flashlight, a mirror, compass, level, ruler, and magnifier as well as the Security app that lets you scan for viruses, clean junk files, keep an eye on your large files, manage your data traffic, and control permissions for each app.

Meizu offers a Smart Touch feature for single-handed operation of the rather big 5.5-inch smartphone. There's a virtual 4-way key that can be assigned different functionality to each of the directions, tap and hold, tap, and double tap. I spent a little time with it, carefully configuring it, and that now allows me to control the m3 note with just one hand for almost everything.

Meizu m3 note Battery life

The m3 note boasts of an impressive 4100 mAh battery – about 30% more than its predecessor. That's a big upgrade, making the battery life one of the highlights of this budget device. The Meizu m3 note offers solid uptime on a single charge, and can easily last for day and a half on moderate usage.

Even for a power user like me, I would have some juice left at the end of a working day. While switching from Performance Power mode to Balanced mode, you'd be able to squeeze in a few more hours easily.

Meizu m3 note Camera

The Meizu m3 note packs a 13-megapixel camera sensor with dual-tone LED flash, the latter allowing for more pleasing colors in low-light photos taken with flash.

Although there's advanced PDAF auto-focus, the photos are inconsistent. Sometimes the photos turn out to be blurred or I had to select the focus point manually because the autofocus went haywire. When it does, the m3 note takes decent photos with accurate color reproduction as well as nice contrast ratio. The HDR mode brings more details in the highlights and the shadows, and I preferred it over the Auto mode. The overall image quality though is marred by additive noise and several samples I shot turned out to be grainy. At similar price points, both Lenovo K5 Plus and Xiaomi Redmi Note 3 click superior photos with more details and better processing.

The 5-megapixel front camera though fares much better. There's enough details in your selfies and the colors are good enough. The Meizu m3 note shoots videos up to 1080p resolution at 30fps. The captured videos turn out to be just about decent with limited details.

The camera offers several shooting modes apart from the usual Auto, Macro, and Manual modes. There's a Beauty mode which makes eyes bigger, face slimmer, and adds glow to your face (ugh!), a Panorama mode, a Light field mode allowing you to defocus any part of a scene, Scan mode to read QR codes and barcodes, as well as a Slow motion mode.

Meizu m3 note Bottom line

There are very few notable omissions in the Meizu m3 note. There's no fast charging and Android Lollipop in 2016 hurts, and there are several misses here and there. Yet, the m3 note looks like a well-rounded package and at first glance, impresses a lot of budget-conscious users.

Should you buy it? Probably

The Meizu m3 note is really a mixed bag. It's nicely designed with solid construction, and the battery life is excellent. But the overall performance and camera quality is average. I'm inclined to like this phone and it feels good in hand, but at ₹9,999 ($147), Meizu should've done a better job. If you are a power user, the m3 note will disappoint you, but for most regular users, the performance hit would just be okay if you prefer a nice phone to flaunt and warm up to mTouch.

See at Amazon

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5 days ago

Best gaming controllers for the Amazon Fire TV

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Best Controllers for the Amazon Fire TV

Gaming on your Amazon Fire TV? You have more controller options than you might think.

Looking to invite friends over for a multiplayer session on your Amazon Fire TV but not sure what controllers are compatible with it?

No worries. We've broken out a list of some of your best controller options for the Amazon Fire TV — and chances are you may already own something that's compatible without knowing.

Amazon Fire TV Gaming Controller

Amazon Fire TV Bluetooth controller

An obvious but necessary inclusion on this list, if you enjoy the gaming controller that came with your Amazon Fire TV Gaming Edition, you can buy extra controllers from — where else — Amazon.

The Amazon Fire TV controller connects via Bluetooth and has a number of features specifically designed to get the most out of your Amazon Fire TV box. For starters, it includes a built-in microphone, which gives you full access to Alexa features and allows you to search for games, movies, music, and more information, using only your voice.

The controllers also feature a headphone jack, so you can fully immerse yourself in a movie or game without bothering the people around you.

The Amazon Fire TV controller takes two AA batteries, so you should stock up on those if you plan on becoming a heavy gamer.

See at Amazon

Xbox 360 Wired Controller

Microsoft Xbox 360 Wired Controller

The wired version of the Xbox 360 controller works nearly flawlessly with the Amazon Fire TV. Simply plug in the controller to the USB port on the back of your Amazon Fire TV and you're good to go.

Looking to attach more than one USB controller? It's as simple as first plugging in a USB hub then plugging in up to four controllers. If you've got a couple plugged in, you'll even notice the player indicator lights will light up properly — a small but reassuring feature.

There's a whole bunch of [third-party controllers that work with the Amazon Fire](, including the wireless versions of the Xbox 360 controllers, but the reason why we're not recommending the wireless variant is because you'll also need to own Microsoft's Xbox 360 Wireless Receiver for Windows.

If you happen to already have a few of the wireless Xbox 360 controllers around, the dongle receiver may be the better option. If you don't, the wired variety are your best bet, as you won't have to worry about batteries or connectivity issues.

See on Amazon

DualShock 4 Bluetooth Controller (for PS4)

PS4 DualShock 4 Bluetooth Controller

The DualShock controller has been an industry standard and trailblazer since first being introduced for the original PlayStation back in 1998. While the technology inside the controller has improved, the overall design has remained largely unchanged and it's clear to see why — it's incredibly comfortable to hold.

Sony's DualShock 4 Bluetooth Controller is a great option that's compatible with your Amazon Fire TV. It's quick to pair — simply go into the Amazon Fire TV's Bluetooth controller settings, then hold down the Share and PS button on the DualShock controller to start the pairing.

The DualShock 4 controller is a surprisingly versatile controller; beyond using it with your PS4 and Amazon Fire TV, it's also compatible with Windows for PC gaming.

See at Amazon

SteelSeries Stratus XL

SteelSeries Stratus XL

The SteelSeries Stratus XL is a great controller that works for gaming on your Windows PC, Android phone, and Amazon Fire TV. SteelSeries has basically taken the best features from the DualShock and Xbox 360 controllers and combined them to create the Stratus XL.

It connects via Bluetooth and plays for up to 40 hours on two AA batteries. It's got nearly perfect weight to it and has been designed to fit comfortably in your hands for marathon gaming sessions.

Starting at over $60, the price might give you pause, but you really can't go wrong with this versatile, comfortable controller.

See at Amazon

Logitech Gamepad F310

Logitech Gamepad F310

If you're looking for a cheaper USB controller option, the Gamepad F310 from Logitech is a good choice.

It features the same analog stick layout as the DualShock and a cord that should be long enough to reach from the Amazon Fire TV to the couch. This one is also plug-and-play, meaning you shouldn't have to worry about setting things up.

And since this is a cheaper option, starting at $19.99, you could stock up on a couple of them, along with a decent USB hub and always be prepared for some multiplayer action.

See at Amazon

What's your preferred third-party controller?

Do you have a favorite gaming controller that didn't make our list? Tell us about it in the comments!

Amazon Fire TV

Amazon Best Buy

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5 days ago

AC editors' apps of the week: WiFiMapper, Atomas, OneBusAway and more

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It's Appday Sunday and that means we're back with more of our favorites to share. Every week we bring a handful of great apps to the table and share them with everyone. Sometimes they are new apps, sometimes old standards, but every time they are apps we love to use.

Give these a look and then take a minute to tell us all about the apps you are using and love so we can give them a try. We all find some of our favorites right in the comments on these posts!

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5 days ago

Mobile Nations Weekly: MrMobile!

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Say hello to the one, the only, the MrMobile.

Michael Fisher is back in action, ladies and gentlemen! As the one and only MrMobile, he'll be bringing to YouTube, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram his own unique take on the latest and greatest in technology.

MrMobile launched officially with the above amazing video, plus a review of the new OnePlus 3, a nerdy in-depth examination of the Star Trek Bluetooth Communicator, and a look at Tesla's EV offerings.

Give MrMobile a subscribe for even more great videos from the world of mobile technology!

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5 days ago

Grab a limited edition Android Namey McNameface t-shirt now!

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Google is having a bit of fun in the latest Android N Developer Preview by trolling us with a Namey McNameface Easter egg. While we doubt the name is going to stick for the final version, it's still a great name and would make for a heck of a shirt, huh? Especially since when Google announced that it would be seeking submissions for the name of the update, it specifically called out Namey McNameface as something that should not be submitted.

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5 days ago

Best wireless security cameras

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Best wireless security cameras

Security, sans power cables.

Having a home security camera is a great way to keep an eye on your house while you're out. Sometimes, you'd like to place your camera in such a way that power cables might be cumbersome or might not reach. Battery-powered security cameras are an excellent solution but are few and far between right now, since they usually have to compromise on key features. We've rounded up our favorites to help keep your security untethered to power outlets (for a while at least).

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5 days ago

Best accessories for Toshiba Chromebook 2

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Best accessories for Toshiba Chromebook 2

Customize your Toshiba Chromebook 2 with these great accessories!

So you've got yourself a Toshiba Chromebook 2 and want to know how you can make it your own.

Don't worry, we've done the searching for you and we know just what you'll need, so you can deck it out with all the best accessories.

Skinit vinyl skins

Skinit Chromebook 2 skins

A vinyl skin is a great way to decorate your Chromebook 2 and protect it from scratches. Skinit offers hundreds of skins with designs ranging from Hello Kitty to your college alma mater, classics paintings to abstract art starting at around $30. You can also customize a skin with your own photos or artwork.

The skins are a breeze to install and just as easy to remove, with no residue left behind, so you can change it up as often as you like. They take into account the Chromebook 2's indicator lights and ports so you always have access to what you need.

See at Skinit

iPearl mCover hard shell case

iPearl mCover hard shell for Chromebook 2

To protect your Chromebook 2 from bumps or drops you'll need a hard shell case, and iPearl's offering is just right. It's designed specifically for the Chromebook 2, is available in nine colors, and is priced around $20.

The translucent polycarbonate material is shatter-proof and it covers every corner. It's also designed not to interfere with the heat vents at the bottom, to prevent your laptop overheating, and retractable feet at the rear bottom of the case make typing at a desk ergonomic and comfortable.

See at Amazon

Toshiba dynadock universal docking station

Toshiba dynadock for Chromebook 2

The dynadock will turn your Chromebook 2 into a multi-tasking, multi-media machine. If you can't live without adding screens and having a massive variety of ports and options, this is the accessory you need. You can buy it directly from Toshiba for about $166.

You'll be able to connect two additional HD displays for movies and gaming, along with added surround sound capabilities. It has six USB 2.0 ports and two USB 3.0 ports, so you'll never run out of ways to plug in your other devices, whether it's for fast data transfer or connecting to a printer.

See at Amazon


JETech Bluetooth mouse

JETech bluetooth mouse

Sometimes you just need a mouse to get the job (or the game) done. This Bluetooth mouse from JETech pairs with your Chromebook 2 to give you the portability of a laptop and the feel of a desktop — all for about $17.

The design is slim and ambidextrous. It clicks quietly and with precision, thanks to the high-definition optical sensor, and holds the connection to your Chromebook 2 wherever you are. All it takes is one AA battery, which will power the mouse for up to one year before needing to be replaced.

See at Amazon

Sound Intone headphones

Sound Intone headphones

Block out the noise around you with headphones from Sound Intone. You'll be able to focus on your music or hear every piece of dialogue from your favorite show on your morning commute. The built-in microphone also lets you talk away during video calls.

The on-ear design is comfortable, with padding that isn't overly bulky. The headphones also conveniently fold up for easy storage when you're on the move. Sound Intone makes them completely adjustable so that anyone can wear them and they come in at around $18.

See at Amazon

Logitech multimedia speakers

Logitech multimedia speakers

Everyone needs to get a little loud from time to time, and so does your Chromebook 2. Unleash those movie and game soundtracks with gusto by adding Logitech's multimedia speakers for about $23.

You're able to plug in two devices, such as your phone and your laptop, and the speakers will play from both sources at the same time. If you want to switch to headphones , just plug into the headphone jack into the front of the right speaker and you're good to go.

See at Amazon

Evecase briefcase bag

Evecase briefcase bag

Easily take your Chromebook 2 everywhere you go with this briefcase bag from Evecase. Your laptop will fit snug inside (even with a skin or hard case on it) and be protected from bumps and jostles while you're travelling or just getting from one place to another on a busy day.

It comes with a mousepad and a smaller pouch that snaps onto the bag that's designed to hold your phone, your mouse, a USB or two, or a charging cable. You can get yours in one of four different colors for around $22.

See at Amazon

So wise to accessorize

Have you found some stellar accessories that you and your Chromebook 2 just can't be without? We want to know about them! Tell us all the details in the comments!

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5 days ago

Lies, damned lies, and Facebook

201
Mark Zuckerberg

"I saw on Facebook that ..." No. Stop. You didn't see anything on Facebook. You saw something that Facebook wanted you to click on.

I think at this point it's pretty clear that the "Brexit" aftermath — to say nothing of the political landscape in the United States — points to a sad reality.

We don't know what the hell we're talking about anymore. And I'm prepared to squarely lay the blame on one thing.

Facebook.

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